TikTok: Video app asks creators about biggest weaknesses

  • A TikTok survey shown to creators in the app indicates where the company thinks its biggest weaknesses might be.
  • In the survey issued late September, TikTok wanted to know if creators felt they were getting enough views, if they were paid enough, and if they had enough face time with local representatives.
  • It makes sense that TikTok wants to keep its creators happy as competition grows.
  • TikTok faces a squeeze for talent from rival services by YouTube, Instagram, and third parties like Triller.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

You can get a sense of the biggest issues an organization thinks it has by the questions it asks of its users.

Companies often conduct surveys of customers to identify issues — and TikTok is no different.

The social media platform quizzed a select group of its users in late September, and alongside the usual questions about their satisfaction with

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ByteDance asks China for approval to export TikTok technology: report

TikTok’s parent company ByteDance has sought permission from the Chinese government to export technology, Bloomberg reported Wednesday.

ByteDance filed a request with the Beijing Municipal Commerce Bureau asking for approval to export its technology under restrictions recently implemented by the Chinese government, according to Bloomberg.

ByteDance, TikTok, and the Commerce Bureau did not respond to requests for comment.

In August, China expanded its list of “forbidden and restricted technology exports” to include “personalized information recommendation services based on data analysis” — such as the algorithm that powers TikTok. That move threw a wrench in the TikTok deal by requiring the company to obtain a license from the government, effectively giving Beijing veto power over a deal.

Following the announcement of the new rules, ByteDance reportedly considered bypassing that hurdle by selling TikTok without handing over its source code, but Bloomberg’s report Wednesday suggests the company wants the algorithm to be

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TikTok Asks 9 Social Media Companies To Help Combat Suicide Content After Viral Video

Topline

TikTok has asked other social media platforms to join it in establishing a partnership to better combat content depicting self-harm and suicide after clips from a Facebook livestream of a man taking his own life circulated around TikTok, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and more for weeks earlier this month.

Key Facts

The August 31 Facebook livestream of Ronnie McNutt, a 33-year-old veteran, taking his own life remained on Facebook for nearly three hours after his death, and quickly went viral on other social media platforms, which struggled to keep up with accounts reposting clips of his death, sometimes disguised as videos of cute animals. 

On TikTok, where an estimated 18 million daily users are 14 or younger, teens and their parents complained that videos were recommended on the “For You” discovery page, with

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TikTok asks judge to block Trump ban

TikTok is asking a federal judge to block the Trump administration’s impending ban on its operations in the United States.

The company filed for a preliminary injunction in the District of Columbia on Wednesday to keep the app in U.S. app stores while negotiations over the company’s future are in limbo.

The ban, which is set to go into effect just before midnight Sept. 27, would cause TikTok “irreparable harm,” Vanessa Pappas, the company’s interim head executive, said in its filing.

President Donald Trump on Saturday said he had given his “blessing” to a deal struck by TikTok’s parent company, ByteDance, and Oracle and Walmart, which would avert a ban announced by the Department of Commerce last week. But that deal is still subject to some negotiations, leaving TikTok with the ban still looming.

Pappas also predicted that TikTok could lose up to half of its user base if the

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Justice Department asks Congress to limit Section 230 protections for tech firms

The U.S. Justice Department today sent Congress draft legislation intended to limit the scope of Section 230, a legal shield that gives online platforms immunity against certain types of lawsuits. 

Section 230 is a statute in the Communications Decency Act that protects companies such as Facebook Inc. from being held legally liable for user content. It allows tech firms to remove a post without the risk of being sued if they deem it to be “obscene, lewd, lascivious, filthy, excessively violent, harassing or otherwise objectionable.” Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have called for Section 230 to be revised amid a broader debate in Washington about social media.

The change proposed by the Justice Department today consists of several points. First, the draft legislation seeks to narrow the criteria that tech companies must meet to qualify for the Section 230 legal shield. Under the proposal, an online platform could

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Chevron asks employees to delete WeChat after U.S. ban

(Reuters) – U.S. oil giant Chevron Corp <CVX.N> has asked employees globally to delete Tencent Holdings Ltd’s WeChat from their work phones, following the Trump administration’s executive order to ban the social media app, Bloomberg News reported on Wednesday.

A U.S. judge on Sunday blocked a government order requiring Apple Inc <AAPL.O> and Alphabet Inc’s Google <GOOGL.O> to remove WeChat for downloads on national security grounds.

The U.S. Commerce Department said on Monday it would challenge the order.

WeChat is an all-in-one mobile app that combines messaging, social media, payment functions and other services and boasts more than a billion users globally.

Chevron, in a staff email, identified WeChat as a “non-compliant application” and asked those with the app on their work handsets to delete it before Sept. 27 or face disconnection from the company’s network, according to the Bloomberg report.

Chevron and Tencent, which has denied its apps pose

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Chevron Asks Global Employees to Delete WeChat After Trump Ban

(Bloomberg) — Chevron Corp. has asked its global employees to remove Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s WeChat from their work phones, making it one of the first U.S. companies to heed the Trump administration’s executive order banning the Chinese social app on alleged national security risks.



a screenshot of a cellphone: The Tencent Holdings Ltd. WeChat app is displayed in the App Store on a smartphone in an arranged photograph taken in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. President Donald Trump signed a pair of executive orders prohibiting U.S. residents from doing business with the Chinese-owned TikTok and WeChat apps beginning 45 days from now, citing the national security risk of leaving Americans' personal data exposed.


© Bloomberg
The Tencent Holdings Ltd. WeChat app is displayed in the App Store on a smartphone in an arranged photograph taken in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. President Donald Trump signed a pair of executive orders prohibiting U.S. residents from doing business with the Chinese-owned TikTok and WeChat apps beginning 45 days from now, citing the national security risk of leaving Americans’ personal data exposed.

The American oil giant identified WeChat as a “non-compliant application” in a staff email, asking those who installed the app on their work handsets to delete it within days — or they will be disconnected from the

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