Polar ice, atmospheric water vapor biggest drivers of variation among climate models — ScienceDaily

A Florida State University researcher is part of a team that has found varying projections on global warming trends put forth by climate change scientists can be explained by differing models’ predictions regarding ice loss and atmospheric water vapor.

The work will help climate scientists reconcile various models to improve their accuracy, said Florida State University Meteorology Professor Ming Cai, one of the authors of the study published in Nature Communications .

Climate scientists agree that the Earth’s surface temperature is warming, but the details of exactly where and by how much are less clear. A worst-case climate change scenario (known as the “Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5”) predicted a likely increase in average global temperatures of about 2.6 degrees Celsius to 4.8 degrees Celsius (or about 4.7 degrees Fahrenheit to 8.6 degrees Fahrenheit) by 2100.

“This uncertainty limits our ability to foresee the severity of the global warming impacts on

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As atmospheric carbon rises, so do rivers, adding to flooding

flood
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

When it comes to climate change, relationships are everything. That’s a key takeaway of a new UO study that examines the interaction between plants, atmospheric carbon dioxide and rising water levels in the Mississippi River.


Published recently in the Geological Society of America’s journal GSA Today, the study compared historical atmospheric carbon data against observations of herbarium leaf specimens to quantify the relationship between rising carbon levels and increasingly catastrophic floods in the American Midwest.

Using data covering more than two centuries, researchers demonstrated that as carbon levels in the atmosphere have risen due to the burning of fossil fuels, the ability of plants to absorb water from the air has decreased. That means more rainfall makes its way into rivers and streams, adding to their potential for damaging floods.

Co-authored by UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History geologist Greg Retallack and earth sciences

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Planet collision simulations give clues to atmospheric loss from Moon’s origin — ScienceDaily

Earth could have lost anywhere between ten and 60 per cent of its atmosphere in the collision that is thought to have formed the Moon.

New research led by Durham University, UK, shows how the extent of atmospheric loss depends upon the type of giant impact with the Earth.

Researchers ran more than 300 supercomputer simulations to study the consequences that different huge collisions have on rocky planets with thin atmospheres.

Their findings have led to the development of a new way to predict the atmospheric loss from any collision across a wide range of rocky planet impacts that could be used by scientists who are investigating the Moon’s origins or other giant impacts.

They also found that slow giant impacts between young planets and massive objects could add significant atmosphere to a planet if the impactor also has a lot of atmosphere.

The findings are published in the Astrophysical

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Data collected during Hurricane Laura presents major benefits in engineering, atmospheric science fields

Data collected during Hurricane Laura presents major benefits in engineering, atmospheric science fields
Wind readings from Hurricane Laura. Credit: Texas Tech University

Hurricane Laura was the most documented hurricane to ever make landfall in the U.S.


In late August, Hurricane Laura, a Category 4 storm, made landfall in Louisiana. It was one of the strongest storms to make landfall in the U.S., as measured by maximum sustained winds.

Researchers from Texas Tech University’s Hurricane Research Team (TTUHRT), which consists of faculty and graduate students from Texas Tech’s Atmospheric Science Group and the National Wind Institute (NWI), were on the ground, tracking Hurricane Laura as it swept across the Gulf Coast.

The team deployed 48 StickNet platforms and two Ka-band Mobile Doppler Radar Trucks to take measurements and collect data from Hurricane Laura. The results? Hurricane Laura is now the most well-documented major hurricane that has made landfall in the U.S.

John Schroeder, senior director of the NWI and a professor of atmospheric science,

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