Cincinnati Based Gym Is First in The Nation to Use New Medical Grade Technology to Kill Viruses and Bacteria

CINCINNATI, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — A new gym based out of Cincinnati, OH is boosting client confidence for a return to the gym by utilizing a new medical grade UVGI technology that meets the CDC standard for killing viruses.  Tyler and Michelle Menke are a husband/wife duo that had a dream of opening a fitness business.  After years of research and analysis of other fitness franchises, last December they decided to take the leap and began making plans for the development of a gym concept that would incorporate their love of strength training and yoga. 

Then COVID hit…

After lots of sleepless nights, the Menke’s came to a decision to keep pursuing their dream.  Tyler, who quit his high paying medical device job to dedicate time to the gym, began making calls to old vendor contacts and found a left over UVGI system from the pop-up hospitals.  He

Read More

‘Creeping fat’ in Crohn’s patients linked to bacteria — ScienceDaily

In many patients with Crohn’s disease abdominal fat migrates to the wall of the inflamed small intestines. What prompts the fat tissue to “creep” through the abdomen and wrap around the intestines of many patients with this inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been an enduring mystery.

Now, investigators have identified a critical clue. In a study published in the journal CELL this week, researchers from Cedars-Sinai show that the peculiar creeping activity of the fat appears to initially be protective but then ends up doing more harm than good.

“Creeping fat is often a landmark for surgeons performing resections on an IBD patient’s bowels because they know when they see it, that’s likely where the lesions are located,” said Suzanne Devkota, PhD, principal investigator and lead author of the study. “But we don’t know whether the presence of the fat is making the disease worse or trying to protect the

Read More

Marine bacteria shift between lifestyles to get the best resources — ScienceDaily

To stay, or not to stay? When it comes to nutrient resource patches, researchers from Japan and Switzerland have discovered that marine bacteria have a knack for exploiting them efficiently, timing movements between patches to get the best resources.

In a study published this month in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A., researchers from the University of Tsukuba and ETH Zurich have revealed that marine bacteria optimize nutrient uptake by switching between dispersal and resource exploitation.

Heterotrophic bacteria (i.e., those that cannot produce their own food, instead obtaining nutrition from other sources of organic carbon, such as plant or animal matter) are the main recyclers of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean. Hotspots of DOM that are made up of particles, such as marine snow, are important to the global carbon cycle.

“Some groups of heterotrophic bacteria take advantage of these hotspots,” says one of the

Read More

Transplanted bacteria from sleep-apnea mice caused sleep changes in recipient mice — ScienceDaily

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic sleep condition affecting more than one billion people worldwide. Evidence suggests OSA can alter the gut microbiome (GM) and may promote OSA-associated co-morbidities, including diabetes, hypertension and cognitive problems. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care have discovered how OSA-related sleep disturbances affect the gut microbiome in mice and how transplanting those gut bacteria into other mice can cause changes to sleep patterns in the recipient mice.

David Gozal, MD, the Marie M. and Harry L. Smith Endowed Chair of Child Health at the MU School of Medicine, said the study shows the gut microbiome plays a major role in sleep regulation. This ultimately could translate into treatments that target the gut microbiome in humans with OSA.

“By manipulating the gut microbiome, or the byproducts of the gut microbiota, we would be in a position to prevent

Read More

‘New’ lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe — ScienceDaily

A research project headed by the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products.

The majority of the world’s camels are located in East Africa, where they are a common dairy animal. Camel milk constitutes upwards of 9% of the total milk production of Africa. The farmers, who milk the animals, sell much of the milk as a fermented product in local markets or roadside stalls.

The fermentation process occurs spontaneously as the farmers have no cooling facilities. Given that the level of hygiene is often poor, the milk often also contains disease-causing microorganisms such as E.coli and salmonella, which have the opportunity to multiply in the lukewarm milk.

“New” bacteria ferment the milk and increase safety

In a research project, researchers from the National Food Institute, Technical University

Read More