Central Asian horse riders played ball games 3,000 years ago — ScienceDaily

Researchers have investigated ancient leather balls discovered in the graves of horse riders in northwest China. According to the international research team, they are around 3,000 years old, making them the oldest balls in Eurasia. The find suggests amongst others that the mounted warriors of Central Asia played ball games to keep themselves fit.

Today, ball games are one of the most popular leisure activities in the world, an important form of mass entertainment and big business. But who invented balls, where and when? The oldest balls that are currently known about were made in Egypt about 4,500 years ago using linen. Central Americans have been playing ball games for at least 3,700 years, as evidenced through monumental ball courts made of stone and depictions of ball players. Their oldest balls were made of rubber. Until now, it was believed that ball games in Europe and Asia followed much later:

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World Beverage Can Ends Market Huge Incredible Growth by 2026 | Ball, Crown, Anhui Wonderful-wall Color Coating Aluminium Science Technology

IndexMarketsResearch.com offering a new research report on The“Global Beverage Can Ends Market by Distribution Channel and Geography – Global Trends, Analysis and Forecast 2020-2026”

A new research report released by Index Markets Research with the title “GlobalBeverage Can EndsMarket Size, Status and Forecast 2020-2026”. The report provides an overview of the growth rate of the Beverage Can Ends market during the forecast period, i.e., 2020–2026. Most significantly, the report further identifies the qualitative impact of variety market factors on market segments and geographies. The research segments the market on the basis of product type, application, technology, and region. To offer more clarity regarding the industry, the report takes a closer look at the current status of different factors including but not limited to supply chain management, niche markets, distribution channel, trade, supply, and demand and production capability across different countries.In the end, the report makes some important

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Soccer ball brings energy to developing world

(CBS News) The sOccket looks like an ordinary soccer ball, but it’s much more than that. It’s a power source for small electronic devices — something the developing world desperately needs.

The innovative ball is the brainchild of Harvard graduates Julia C. Silverman and Jessica O. Matthews, who came up with the idea while taking an engineering class for non-engineers. The class’ intent was to use art in science to bring change.

Both Silverman and Matthews have backgrounds with developing countries and used the stories of those areas in generating their idea. “Everybody (in the areas we wanted to target) had this strong love of soccer,” Silverman said. “But almost nobody has consistent access to electricity.”

How does the device work?

It harnesses kinetic energy using a stripped-down gyroscope inside the ball that’s rolling as the ball is rolling. The gyroscope harnesses the kinetic energy generated during play and stores

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Having a ball: Crystallization in a sphere

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IMAGE: Researchers from The University of Tokyo and Fudan University observe the crystallization process in a droplet
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Credit: Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo

Tokyo, Japan–Crystallization is the assembly of atoms or molecules into highly ordered solid crystals, which occurs in natural, biological, and artificial systems. However, crystallization in confined spaces, such as the formation of the protein shell of a virus, is poorly understood. Researchers are trying to control the structure of the final crystal formed in a confined space to obtain crystals with desired properties, which requires thorough knowledge of the crystallization process.

A research group at Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo and Fudan University led by Hajime Tanaka and Peng Tan used a droplet of a colloid–a dispersion of liquid particles in another liquid, like milk–as a model for single atoms or molecules in a sphere. Unlike single atoms or

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