This Week’s Red Dead Online Update: Golden Spirit Bear

Continuing the Naturalist theme this week, Red Dead Online’s newest animal to track is the Golden Spirit Bear. If you kill or sample the bear, you can receive 50% off an Established or Higher Naturalist Item. And if you bring it to Gus’ Trapper Store, you can get a coat made out of the bear’s blonde fur.

As always, players can visit Harriet at her store to launch the mission. While there, players can also pick up a Vitalism Studies Pamphlet and start gathering Harrietum Officinalis to transform temporarily into a wild boar.

If you play Red Dead Online anytime between October 6 and 12, you can earn 5,000 Club XP. Players will also earn double XP from roleplay missions–including Bounties, Trader and Moonshiner Sell Missions, Moonshiner Story and Bootlegger Missions, and Naturalist Sighting and Poaching Missions. More events are also offering double XP and include Free Roam Events and

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Black Bear Mauls Circus Trainer Before Screaming Audience, Incident Caught On Camera

KEY POINTS

  • The bear attacked the trainer after he allegedly stopped the animal from eating treats
  • The trainer was not severely injured in the incident as the animal had its teeth
  • Local authorities were investigating the incident and the circus has been temporarily shut down

An animal trainer was viciously attacked by a black bear during a circus show in Henan province of central China on Friday.

The 440-pound Asian black bear attacked the unidentified man after he allegedly stopped the animal from eating treats.

“A boy threw a sausage [onto the stage]. The bear wanted to eat it, and the tamer wouldn’t allow it because it’s performing,” a witness told Pear News, adding that the bear attacked the trainer after he beat the animal.

Video of the incident showed the bear pinning the trainer to the ground and attacking and biting the man in front of screaming audience. His

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Russia’s Fancy Bear hackers likely penetrated a federal agency

SONY DSC

Boris SV | Getty Images

A warning that unidentified hackers broke into an agency of the US federal government and stole its data is troubling enough. But it becomes all the more disturbing when those unidentified intruders are identified—and appear likely to be part of a notorious team of cyberspies working in the service of Russia’s military intelligence agency, the GRU.

Last week the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency published an advisory that hackers had penetrated a US federal agency. It identified neither the attackers nor the agency, but it did detail the hackers’ methods and their use of a new and unique form of malware in an operation that successfully stole target data. Now, clues uncovered by a researcher at cybersecurity firm Dragos and an FBI notification to hacking victims obtained by WIRED in July suggest a likely answer to the mystery of who was behind the intrusion: They

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The Trump Administration Hid Polar Bear Research

The Trump administration doesn’t care about these guys.

The Trump administration doesn’t care about these guys.
Photo: BJ Kirschhoffer/Polar Bears International

A federal study found that oil and gas drilling in Alaska puts polar bears at risk. But U.S. Geological Survey Director James Reilly, the head of the department that conducted the research, refused to make the study public, the Washington Post reported on Wednesday.

The Interior Department’s research looked into the number of polar bears that den and give birth on Alaska’s North Slope near the southern Beaufort Sea. The Trump administration has moved to open up that area to oil and gas drilling and exploration.

Internal memos also obtained by the Post show that the federal research has been complete for at least three months, but Reilly held it up, raising questions about its method of counting polar bear dens and why it uses data collected by a former agency scientist who now works for

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USGS Director James Reilly holds up polar bear study that could affect Trump’s drilling plans for Alaska

In an unusual move, U.S. Geological Survey Director James Reilly has refused to make public the study, by his own scientists, of the number of female polar bears that den and give birth on land near the southern Beaufort Sea. That is the same area that overlaps with federal land the Trump administration has opened up to oil and natural-gas development.

The study has been ready for at least three months. But Reilly — a geologist by training and former astronaut — has questioned why it uses data collected by a former agency scientist now working for an advocacy group and why it does not count each polar bear den individually, among other things, according to internal memos obtained by The Post.

The study, also obtained by The Post, notes that shrinking sea ice in the Arctic threatens the survival of polar bears while enhancing the opportunity for oil and

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iOS 14.2 Beta 2 Adds New Emoji Characters like Ninja, Pinata, Bubble Tea, Polar Bear and More

The second beta of iOS 14.2 introduces the new Emoji 13 characters that Apple previewed earlier this year as part of World Emoji Day.


New emoji options include ninja, people hugging, black cat, bison, fly, polar bear, blueberries, fondue, bubble tea, and more, with a list below.

  • Faces – Smiling Face with Tear, Disguised Face
  • People – Ninja, Person in Tuxedo, Woman in Tuxedo, Person with Veil, Man with Veil, Woman Feeding Baby, Person Feeding Baby, Man Feeding Baby, Mx. Claus, People Hugging
  • Body Parts – Pinched fingers, Anatomical Heart, Lungs
  • Animals – Black Cat, Bison, Mammoth, Beaver, Polar Bear, Dodo, Seal, Beetle, Cockroach, Fly, Worm
  • Food – Blueberries, Olive, Bell Pepper, Flatbread, Fondue, Bubble Tea, Tamale
  • Household – Potted Plant, Teapot, Piñata, Magic Wand, Nesting Dolls, Sewing Needle, Mirror, Window, Plunger, Mouse Trap, Bucket, Toothbrush
  • Miscellaneous – Feather, Rock, Wood, Hut, Pickup Truck, Roller Skate, Knot, Coin, Boomerang, Screwdriver,
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Landsat Next likely to bear little resemblance to its predecessors

NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) plan to issue a Request for Information by the end of the year on instrumentation and platforms for Landsat Next, the Earth observation system to follow Landsat 9.

“Rather than one single large satellite bus, which is what Landsat has been historically, we’ve looked at other options,” USGS Director Jim Reilly said in an interview.

NASA and USGS recently completed an 18-month Sustainable Land Imaging Architecture Study to evaluate the capabilities of existing and planned government and commercial satellites.

“The revolution in space is underway and we’ll want to capitalize on that as much as we possibly can,” said Reilly, a former NASA astronaut. “The critical piece for NASA and USGS is looking at how we combine all that information and how we calibrate and validate it.”

Iceland’s Ok Glacier has lost so much mass since Landsat 1 launched in 1972 to monitor
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