She bootstrapped her company after facing bias. Now she’s helping others do the same.

This story originally ran on CNBC.com

Melissa Bradley’s mission to help women and people of color build their businesses stems from the hardships she faced as a young entrepreneur.

The 52-year-old, co-founder of the mentorship tech platform Ureeka and a Georgetown University professor, started her first company shortly after she graduated from college 30 years ago. The business’s mission was to provide financial literacy services to parents.

Bradley says that when she went to a government agency for a loan, she was told she had three strikes against her: She was Black, she was a woman and the person said she didn’t know any successful Black women in finance.

Bradley, who recently participated in the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and CNBC + Acorns Invest in You’s “Rebuilding Better: A Virtual Town Hall for America’s Small & New Business Owners,” still managed to get her company off the ground. “I bootstrapped,”

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Facebook’s alleged indifference of Indian hate speech linked to policy chief’s political bias

Over the past several weeks, there has been an increasing clamour for Facebook to place its India public policy head, Ankhi Das, on leave as the company continues with an audit of its India operations.

The impetus for the audit was an article written by the Wall Street Journal in mid-August. In that piece, WSJ reported that Das had resisted against taking down inflammatory content that eventually sparked rioting in the capital city of Delhi as it was posted by members of the nationalist BJP party. 

The riots left over fifty dead, most of whom were Muslims. It also led to many of these Muslims’ homes being torched.

“The company’s top public-policy executive in the country, Ankhi Das, opposed applying the hate-speech rules to [T Raja] Singh and at least three other Hindu nationalist individuals and groups flagged internally for promoting or participating in violence,” WSJ reported.

These inflammatory posts

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Twitter is changing how it crops photos after reports of racial bias

  • Twitter said it is limiting its reliance on machine learning that helps it decide which part of a photo to crop on its platform.
  • Online users have reported racial bias on the social media firm’s image cropping tool, which automatically focuses on the part of a photo it thinks the viewer will find most interesting.
  • One Twitter user recently highlighted how the face of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who is white, was routinely centered in automatic image crops, while that of former President Barack Obama was cut out.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Twitter is making changes to its photo cropping function after an investigation into racial bias in the software, the company said on Thursday.

The announcement comes after users on the platform repeatedly showed that the tool — which uses machine learning to choose which part of an image to crop based on what

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Trump eyes ‘concrete legal steps’ against social media sites for alleged bias against conservatives

Such attacks aren’t new for Trump, who for years has charged that Facebook, Google, Twitter and other popular Web platforms limit the reach of prominent conservative users and news sites. He often has provided scant evidence for his claims, which tech companies vehemently deny.

But the president has ratcheted up his attacks in recent months, as social media companies increasingly take more active, aggressive steps to limit Trump’s most controversial tweets and posts — particularly out of concern they may seed doubts about the legitimacy of the 2020 election and in some cases carry the potential to incite violence.

The president delivered his broadside Wednesday alongside nine Republican state attorneys general, some of whom echoed Trump’s belief that technology companies exhibit political bias against conservatives. U.S. Attorney General William P. Barr later appeared to encourage the GOP leaders in attendance to take action, stressing that the federal government does not

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The DOJ asked Congress to erode big tech’s legal protections as Trump accused firms of anti-conservative bias and ‘cancel culture’



a man looking at the camera: Attorney General William Barr (center) listens during a discussion with state attorneys general on social media abuses hosted by President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room at the White House in Washington, September 23, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner


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Attorney General William Barr (center) listens during a discussion with state attorneys general on social media abuses hosted by President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room at the White House in Washington, September 23, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

  • Attorney General William Barr announced Wednesday the Department of Justice has submitted legislation to Congress to reform the part of the US law that gives tech companies broad powers to moderate their platforms.
  • Barr said the proposed legislation is aimed at “requiring greater transparency and accountability when platforms remove lawful speech.”
  • The legislation follows on from an executive order issued by President Trump in May targeting social media for alleged anti-conservative bias.
  • Trump often claims online platforms are biased against conservatives, but has provided minimal evidence backing this up. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Trump is ramping up the pressure on social media companies.

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Olson says bias training, technology would be her top priorities as chairperson of Augusta Board of Education

Amanda Olson, executive director of the Augusta Housing Authority, speaks during the annual City Council goal-setting meeting in January 2017 at the Augusta Civic Center. Olson is running unopposed for chairperson of the Augusta Board of Education. Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal file

AUGUSTA — Amanda Olson believes the future of Augusta relies on the students who make up its public schools.

An at-large member of the Augusta Board of Education, Olson’s name will appear on the Nov. 3 ballot when she runs unopposed for the three-year position of school board chairperson. She would succeed Ed Hastings, who is not seeking reelection.

Olson said she wants to provide innovative thinking and guide the conversations she believes are necessary to make decisions in the best interest of Augusta’s students.

“I am very passionate about education,” she said. “I truly believe that these students are the future of Augusta, whether it’s through economic development

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Apparent racial bias found in Twitter photo algorithm

An algorithm Twitter uses to decide how photos are cropped in people’s timelines appears to be automatically electing to display the faces of white people over people with darker skin pigmentation. The apparent bias was discovered in recent days by Twitter users posting photos on the social media platform. A Twitter spokesperson said the company plans to reevaluate the algorithm and make the results available for others to review or replicate.

Twitter scrapped its face detection algorithm in 2017 for a saliency detection algorithm, which is made to predict the most important part of an image. A Twitter spokesperson said today that no race or gender bias was found in evaluation of the algorithm before it was deployed “but it’s clear we have more analysis to do.”

Twitter engineer Zehan Wang tweeted that bias was detected in 2017 before

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Artificial Intelligence: Expert warns of ‘potential disaster’ of AI bias | Science | News

Defined as the simulation of human intelligence by machines, examples of everyday AI range from Amazon’s Alexa, Gmail smart replies to predictive searches on Google. Although the baseline benefits of AI are indisputable, the cutting edge technology contains a dangerous caveat – inherent bias.

And an expert in AI has now warned this is an issue which needs to be urgently addressed.

Peter van der Putten, an assistant professor in AI at Leiden University, told Express.co.uk bias represents “a potential disaster”.

He said: “It’s not that AI is by definition is some evil technology, it’s neither good nor bad.

“But it’s not neutral either because it’s built on data and logic that exists in the real world.

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“So in that sense, it can also perpetuate the bias that exists in the real world.”

He went

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