Solar the new ‘king of electricity’ as renewables make up bigger slice of supply: IEA

PARIS (Reuters) – Solar output is expected to lead a surge in renewable power supply in the next decade, the International Energy Agency said, with renewables seen accounting for 80% of growth in global electricity generation under current conditions.

FILE PHOTO: A photovoltaic solar panel farm is seen in Porto Feliz, Sao Paulo state, Brazil February 13, 2020. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli/File Photo

In its annual World Energy Outlook on Tuesday, the IEA said in its central scenario – which reflects policy intentions and targets already announced – renewables are expected to overtake coal as the primary means of producing electricity by 2025.

The combined share of solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind in global generation will rise to almost 30% in 2030 from 8% in 2019, it said, with solar PV capacity growing by an average 12% a year.

“I see solar becoming the new king of the world’s electricity markets,” IEA

Read More

Solar the new ‘king of electricity’ as renewables make up bigger slice of supply

By Forrest Crellin

PARIS (Reuters) – Solar output is expected to lead a surge in renewable power supply in the next decade, the International Energy Agency said, with renewables seen accounting for 80% of growth in global electricity generation under current conditions.

In its annual World Energy Outlook on Tuesday, the IEA said in its central scenario – which reflects policy intentions and targets already announced – renewables are expected to overtake coal as the primary means of producing electricity by 2025.

The combined share of solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind in global generation will rise to almost 30% in 2030 from 8% in 2019, it said, with solar PV capacity growing by an average 12% a year.

“I see solar becoming the new king of the world’s electricity markets,” IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol said. “Based on today’s policy settings, it is on track to set new records for

Read More

Opinion | Don’t Let Amazon Get Any Bigger

We tend to credit Amazon’s enormous reach to its inventiveness. Jeff Bezos has built a logistics operation that rivals UPS and FedEx in the volume of packages it delivers to consumers in the United States. Amazon’s Alexa is the dominant operating system in the new arena of voice-enabled devices and web access.

Amazon produces clothing and advanced computer chips, dispenses a growing share of the nation’s prescription drugs, markets surveillance services to police departments, and runs a rapidly expanding advertising business.

But the evidence presented this week in a long report by the House Judiciary Committee, following a bipartisan investigation of the tech giants, tells a very different story. Amazon’s website forms a choke point through which other companies must pass to reach the market. It has exploited this commanding position to strong-arm other companies, control their means of distribution and drive them out of business.

While the report concludes

Read More

NBC Olympics And Twitter Team Up For Bigger Audiences, More Diverse Content In Expanded Partnership

In 2019, NBC Olympics and Twitter
TWTR
announced a partnership ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics that would see the former produce a 20-minute daily studio show live from Tokyo, among other, more bite-sized content, to stream exclusively on the social media platform.

Now, the two media companies have announced an expanded content partnership that will include not only the postponed Tokyo Olympics in 2021 but the Beijing Winter Olympics in 2022.

In addition to the daily studio show, NBC Olympics and Twitter will work together on content such as a

Read More

If the Democrats win the Senate, Big Tech better be ready for a bigger fight

If the Democrats manage to win control of the Senate in the coming election, the pressure on Silicon Valley would only grow.



Elizabeth Warren standing in front of a building: Democratic senators such as Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts have set their sights on Big Tech.


© MarketWatch photo illustration/iStockphoto, Getty Images
Democratic senators such as Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts have set their sights on Big Tech.

Democratic senators have signaled a willingness to make substantial changes to antitrust law and advocate breakups of the largest American tech companies, including campaigning for president on the issue. If the party can flip four seats, those same senators — such as Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts — could be in position to act against some of their favorite targets, including Facebook Inc. (FB) and Google parent Alphabet Inc. (GOOGL)(GOOG)

Loading...

Load Error

(GOOG)If Democrats wrest control of the U.S. Senate on Nov. 3 (or in the following days and weeks it takes to count ballots), it could lead to the first major changes

Read More

Amazon’s palm reading starts at the grocery store, but it could be so much bigger

Earlier this week, Amazon unveiled Amazon One: new technology for its Amazon Go stores that lets shoppers pay for their groceries by scanning the palm of their hand. By analyzing the shape of your hand and the unique configuration of veins under your skin, Amazon says its technology can verify your identity the same way facial recognition does.

Although Amazon One will initially be used for payments only, it’s clear the tech giant has much bigger ambitions for this hardware. In the future, it says, Amazon One could not only be used for shopping but as a replacement for tickets at music and sporting events, and as an alternative to your office keycard, letting you scan in with a swipe of your hand. In other words, Amazon One isn’t a payment technology. It’s an identity technology, and one that could give Amazon more reach into your life than ever before.

Read More

California Hit by 400 Earthquakes in Swarm on San Andreas Fault, USGS Warns Bigger Quakes Could Strike

A swarm of more than 400 earthquakes has hit California in the area between the San Andreas fault and the Imperial fault, with further seismic activity and potentially larger earthquakes set to follow over the next week.

The biggest earthquake that has been recorded in the swarm so far was a magnitude 4.9, which hit at 5.31 p.m. local time on September 30, but bigger quakes are a possibility.

“In a typical week, there is approximately a three in 10,000 chance of a magnitude 7+ earthquake in the vicinity of this swarm,’ the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) said in a statement. “During this earthquake swarm, the probability of larger earthquakes in this region is significantly greater than usual. Currently, the swarm is rapidly evolving, and we expect to update this forecast with more specific probability information as we collect more data.”

The most likely scenario is that the rate of

Read More

What Happens if Big Tech Only Gets Bigger?

Amy Webb, a quantitative futurist and founder of the strategic foresight firm Future Today Institute, thinks the world can, indeed, get worse.

In her most recent book “2020 Tech Trend Report: Strategic Trends that Will Influence Business, Government, Education, Media and Society in the Coming Year,” Webb examines the companies – and the people who run them – that will make the future either a utopia or a new hell.

Webb’s major idea centers around how the G-MAFIA (an invective and acronym of Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, IBM and Apple) and its Chinese counterpart in BAT (Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent) are becoming increasingly interwoven in our lives.

Related: Better Broadband Will Pave the Way for a ‘Brand New World’

Digital innovations – from artificial intelligence to payments architectures – are not in themselves dangerous. But decisions made today to serve political or shareholder interests, rather than the public good, could

Read More

Widespread wildfires in the far north aren’t just bigger; they’re different — ScienceDaily

“Zombie fires” and burning of fire-resistant vegetation are new features driving Arctic fires — with strong consequences for the global climate — warn international fire scientists in a commentary published in Nature Geoscience.

The 2020 Arctic wildfire season began two months early and was unprecedented in scope.

“It’s not just the amount of burned area that is alarming,” said Dr. Merritt Turetsky, a coauthor of the study who is a fire and permafrost ecologist at the University of Colorado Boulder. “There are other trends we noticed in the satellite data that tell us how the Arctic fire regime is changing and what this spells for our climate future.”

The scientists contend that input and expertise of Indigenous and other local and communities is essential to understanding and managing this global issue.

The commentary identifies two new features of recent Arctic fires. The first is the prevalence of holdover fires, also

Read More

Apple Watch Series 6 teardown reveals bigger battery, Taptic Engine

Repair company iFixit has completed its teardown of the Apple Watch Series 6, revealing a refined design, a beefier battery, and a bigger Taptic Engine.

The Apple Watch Series 6 launched on Sept. 15 with a few key additions, including a blood oxygen sensor and new color options. As far as outward appearance, however, the device appears virtually the same as the previous Apple Watch Series 5.

On Monday, iFixit released its teardown of a 44mm GPS + LTE Apple Watch Series 6 variant. One of the first things that the site noted is that the new wearable opens to the side, rather than from the top. Opening up the device is also a bit easier because of the removal of Apple’s Force Touch gasket. The pressure-sensing feature was removed in watchOS 7.

Credit: iFixit

Credit: iFixit

The 44mm Apple Watch battery has seen a jump to a 1.17 Wh capacity, which

Read More