Purigen Launches New Extraction and Purification Kit that Enables Scientists to Maximize Usable DNA from Limited Biological Samples

Automated Ionic® Cells to Pure DNA Low Input Kit consistently recovers up to twice the amount of high-quality nucleic acid from as few as 10 cultured or sorted cells

Purigen Biosystems, Inc., a leading provider of next-generation technologies for extracting and purifying nucleic acids from biological samples, today announced the launch of the Ionic® Cells to Pure DNA Low Input Kit for researchers working with limited biological samples. The simplified and automated 60-minute workflow delivers high-quality DNA for the rapid investigation of genetic abnormalities or examination of disease treatment effects.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005344/en/

The Ionic Cells to Pure DNA Low Input Kit from Purigen Biosystems (Photo: Business Wire)

The Ionic Cells to Pure DNA Low Input Kit offers consistent recovery of DNA with yields near the theoretical maximum for as many as 100,000 down to as few as 10 cultured

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Olympic athletes should be mindful of their biological clocks — ScienceDaily

Biological clocks have sizeable effects on the performance of elite athletes. This conclusion was drawn by chronobiologists from the University of Groningen after studying the times achieved by swimmers in four different Olympic Games. Shifting the clock to reach peak performance at the right time could make the difference between winning and losing. The results were published on 8 October in the journal Scientific Reports.

‘In many sports, the differences between coming first or second, or winning no medal at all, are very small,’ explains Renske Lok, first author of the paper and former PhD student at the University of Groningen. ‘We wondered whether an athlete’s biological clock was playing a role.’ This clock determines our bodies’ daily rhythms: it regulates physiological characteristics such as core body temperature and blood glucose levels. ‘And we know that peak performance usually coincides with the peak in core body temperature,’ says Lok.

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3D printed ‘invisible’ fibers can sense breath, sound, and biological cells — ScienceDaily

From capturing your breath to guiding biological cell movements, 3D printing of tiny, transparent conducting fibres could be used to make devices which can ‘smell, hear and touch’ — making it particularly useful for health monitoring, Internet of Things and biosensing applications.

Researchers from the University of Cambridge used 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, techniques to make electronic fibres, each 100 times thinner than a human hair, creating sensors beyond the capabilities of conventional film-based devices.

The fibre printing technique, reported in the journal Science Advances, can be used to make non-contact, wearable, portable respiratory sensors. These printed sensors are high-sensitivity, low-cost and can be attached to a mobile phone to collect breath pattern information, sound and images at the same time.

First author Andy Wang, a PhD student from Cambridge’s Department of Engineering, used the fibre sensor to test the amount of breath moisture leaked through his

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Discovery originates in marine biological laboratory’s neurobiology course — ScienceDaily

The dialogue between neurons is of critical importance for all nervous system activities, from breathing to sensing, thinking to running. Yet neuronal communication is so fast, and at such a small scale, that it is exceedingly difficult to explain precisely how it occurs. A preliminary observation in the Neurobiology course at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), enabled by a custom imaging system, has led to a clear understanding of how neurons communicate with each other by modulating the “tone” of their signal, which previously had eluded the field. The report, led by Grant F. Kusick and Shigeki Watanabe of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is published this week in Nature Neuroscience.

In 2016 Watanabe, then on the Neurobiology course faculty, introduced students to the debate over how many synaptic vesicles can fuse in response to one action potential (see this 2-minute video for a quick brush-up on neurotransmission). To

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Researchers study relationship of morphological variation and biological diversity in plants — ScienceDaily

Genome duplications play a major role in the development of forms and structures of plant organisms and their changes across long periods of evolution. Heidelberg University biologists under the direction of Prof. Dr Marcus Koch made this discovery in their research of the Brassicaceae family. To determine the scope of the different variations over 30 million years, they analysed all 4,000 species of this plant family and investigated at the genus level their morphological diversity with respect to all their characteristic traits. The results of this research were published in the journal Nature Communications.

The external form of a plant, also known as its morphology, notably depends on environmental factors and their influences. This is true over short time scales of individual development as well as over the long term on an evolutionary scale. “A plant species always embodies only a portion of the possible breadth of morphological variation

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Realizing the tremendous potential of biological collections will require strategy, action and investment

biodiversity
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A new report on biological collections from The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine points to the need for sustainability, digitization, recruitment of a diverse workforce, and infrastructure upgrades to meet the challenges now facing science and society. The report, “Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century,” says these collections are a critical part of the nation’s science and innovation infrastructure and a fundamental resource for understanding the natural world.


“This report, two years in the making, demonstrates the diverse benefits for science and society of building robust biodiversity infrastructure,” said Joseph Cook, member of the report committee and Regents Professor of Biology and Curator of Mammals of the Museum of Southwestern Biology at The University of New Mexico.

“Many biological collections are at a critical juncture,” said James Collins, co-chair of the committee that wrote the report and Ullman Professor

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