Why The Recent Zoom Crash Is Evidence Of A Remote Technology Boom

Simple, slick and easy-to-implement, Zoom was primed to fill the gap and urgent needs of emerging remote demands. The video conferencing tool has since exploded in popularity, leading the pack of IT tools adopted in the pandemic and becoming an integral part of businesses, schools and conferences.

Despite it’s fast rise to the top, hardly a day passes without at least one mention of Zoom in the news. The company has faced security issues, including having meetings hijacked in attacks called “Zoom-bombings.” More recently, Zoom made headlines because of a sustained outage that caused massive disruption for its users. On the morning of August 24th, 2020, students, teachers and professors around the world were unable to connect for their first day of remote classes, derailed by a Zoom outage that lasted nearly four hours. The incident caused serious headaches and raised serious red flags from users Zoom technology

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Hong Kong IPO Boom Set to Continue, Led by Technology Companies

(Bloomberg) — Hong Kong’s boom in initial public offerings is set to be prolonged as companies given a boost by the pandemic outbreak follow China’s technology giants in selling shares, the bourse’s head of listings said.



a person sitting on a bench in front of a body of water: Views of Hong Kong as China Law to Establish 'Red Lines' for the City, Adviser Says


© Bloomberg
Views of Hong Kong as China Law to Establish ‘Red Lines’ for the City, Adviser Says

Companies from the technology and biotechnology sectors could continue to fill the IPO pipeline in the near future as Covid-19 has boosted investments in research and development, Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing Ltd.’s Head of Listing Bonnie Chan said in an interview on Friday.

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“We thought 2020 would be a disappointment, but it has turned out to be a busy year,” Chan, 50, said. “I believe the IPO rush will continue.”

Hong Kong this year has seen a rush of listings from Chinese companies including JD.com Inc. and Netease Inc., which are selling shares

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Amid a boom in SPACs, few women investors

If you’ve been following the SPAC boom, you may have noticed something about these blank-check vehicles that are springing up left and right in order to take public privately held companies. They are being organized mostly by men.

It’s not surprising, given the relative dearth of women in senior financial positions in banking and the venture industry. But it also begs the question of whether women, already hustling to overcome a wealth gap, could be left behind if the trend gains momentum.

Consider that studies have shown women investors are are twice as likely to invest in startups with at least one female founder, and more than three times as likely to invest in startups with female CEOs. It’s not a huge leap to imagine that women-led SPACs might also be more inclined to identify women-led companies with which to merge and take public.

More, the SPAC sponsors themselves are

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Boom rolls out XB-1 demonstrator aircraft

There’s been very little good news to report in the aviation industry over the past few months, with airplanes grounded or pushed into early retirement.



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© Boom Supersonic


However, Boom Supersonic is going all out to show that there will be light at the end of the tunnel in the future.

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More than 50 years after the world’s first supersonic airliner took its maiden flight, the Denver based start-up has made history with the roll out of XB-1, the first independently developed supersonic aircraft.

Dubbed Baby Boom, the 71-foot-long fuselage is a 1:3 scale prototype of Boom’s upcoming supersonic commercial jet Overture, which is to have a maximum speed of Mach 2.2, making it capable of flying London to New York in just three hours and 30 minutes.

“Supersonic [travel] has been promised for so long,” Blake Scholl, founder and CEO of Boom Supersonic tells CNN Travel.

“What’s

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What the Work-From-Home Boom Means for Your Future

While major corporations furloughing workers and declaring bankruptcy tends to get the biggest headlines, our culture’s dramatic shift to working from home is the true breakout business story from this pandemic. The transition has certainly had its share of ups and downs, but rapidly growing acceptance indicates this is a trend that is almost certainly going to shape the future of work. 



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© cdwheatley | Getty Images


The transition began before 2020

While Covid-19 restrictions caused an abrupt shift, working from home was already accelerating. Research from FlexJobs found that the number of people in the United States who worked from home grew by an astounding 159 percent between 2005 and 2017.

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Much of this growth can be attributed to freelancing. Upwork’s Freelancing in America 2019 survey found that the number of Americans who did freelance work grew from 53 million to 57 million between 2014 and 2019.

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Why the renewable power investment opportunity could rival the smartphone boom. Plus, three REITs for riding out the second wave

BofA Securities analyst Haim Israel is making some tall claims about the future for hydrogen fuel, comparing the scale of the investment opportunity to smartphones before 2007 and the internet during the early 1990s.

A lot has to go right, but Mr. Israel believes hydrogen will account for 24 per cent of the world’s power usage by 2050 and the industry will generate US$2.5-trillion annually.

In a research note last week, the analyst said he sees three primary drivers behind the growth of hydrogen power: the falling costs of generating green hydrogen fuel, new technologies, and ex-U.S. government incentives promoting de-carbonization.

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The current problem with hydrogen fuel is the power needed to produce it. Currently, 99 per cent of hydrogen is made using electricity generated from fossil fuels. (Interestingly, Mr. Israel notes that French industrial gas provider Air Liquide S.A. uses fossil fuels to make hydrogen,

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