7 Countries Tell Facebook To Break Encryption

The governments of seven countries are calling on Facebook and other tech firms to do the technically impossible – to weaken encryption by giving law enforcement access to messages, whilst not reducing user safety.

The governments of the U.S., U.K., Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India and Japan have issued the joint statement which pleads with Facebook specifically, as well as other tech firms, to drop “end-to-end encryption policies which erode the public’s safety online”.

The governments once again raise the issue of child abusers and terrorists using encrypted services such as WhatsApp to send messages without fear of content being intercepted.

“We owe it to all of our citizens, especially our children, to ensure their safety by continuing to unmask sexual predators and terrorists operating online,” the U.K.’s home secretary, Priti Patel, said in a statement.

“It is essential that tech companies

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Are Tech’s Big Four Smart Enough to Break Themselves Up?

House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee Chair David Cicilline.
Photo: Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images

Buried in the one of the most chaotic news cycles of the year, earlier this week the House Judiciary Committee published a report based on its 15-month investigation into the antitrust potential of tech’s big four: Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon. “To put it simply, companies that once were scrappy, underdog startups that challenged the status quo have become the kinds of monopolies we last saw in the era of oil barons and railroad tycoons,” the 449-page report from the antitrust subcommittee states. “They not only wield tremendous power, but they also abuse it by charging exorbitant fees, imposing oppressive contract terms, and extracting valuable data from the people and businesses that rely on them.”

On the most recent episode of the New York podcast Pivot, co-hosts Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway consider the massive investigation and why the

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IBM to Break up 109-Year Old Company to Focus on Cloud Growth | Technology News

(Reuters) – International Business Machines Corp

is splitting itself into two public companies, capping a years-long effort by the world’s first big computing firm to diversify away from its legacy businesses to focus on high-margin cloud computing.

IBM will list its IT infrastructure services unit, which provides technical support for 4,600 clients in 115 countries and has a backlog of $60 billion, as a separate company with a new name by the end of 2021.

The new company will have 90,000 employees and its leadership structure will be decided in a few months, Chief Financial Officer James Kavanaugh told Reuters.

IBM, which currently has more than 352,000 workers, said it expects to record nearly $5 billion in expenses related to the separation and operational changes.

Investors cheered the surprise move by Chief Executive Officer Arvind Krishna, the key architect behind IBM’s $34 billion acquisition of cloud company Red Hat last

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SpaceX may have Dragon spaceships in orbit without a break for a year

SpaceX is preparing to launch four NASA astronauts on its Crew Dragon spaceship this Halloween — the first of six crewed missions the space agency has contracted from the rocket company founded by Elon Musk. (The one that concluded in August was considered a demonstration.)

That’s on top of the cargo resupply missions that SpaceX will regularly launch to the International Space Station for NASA. The company has been sending a spaceship designed to carry supplies, called Cargo Dragon, to the orbiting laboratory since 2012. That vehicle has made over 20 trips to the station and back.

Combined, the two types of Dragon spacecraft are scheduled to launch into space seven times over the next 14 months.

Spacex crew dragon launch

SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spaceship launches from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center with a “Starman” dummy aboard on March 2, 2019.

NASA TV


“Every time there’s a Dragon launch, there’ll be two Dragons in space,”

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Science Centre aims to break boundaries with new series of virtual and on-site events, Singapore News & Top Stories

SINGAPORE – Young children will be able to discover world-changing science in a creative way when the Science Centre’s KidStop Steam Festival for Young Learners kicks off on Thursday (Oct 8).

The four-day event till Sunday (Oct 11) is aimed at children aged three to eight, and melds virtual and on-site events at KidsStop, the Children’s Science Centre.

Steam marries the four disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (Stem) with the arts so as to foster more holistic, multidisciplinary learning, said Associate Professor Lim Tit Meng, chief executive of the Science Centre.

Virtual events include interactive storytelling and sing-along sessions, while on-site activities include a coding challenge for kids to create and protect their own moving bot, and activities around marine conservation.

An All-In “passport” for $38 per child ($5 for accompanying adults) lets children enjoy both online and on-site activities at the festival.

Steam Festival is the first

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US House of Representatives to recommend break up of Big Tech firms

The forthcoming antitrust proposal by the US House of Representatives is being called a “thinly veiled call to break up” large technology firms including Apple, Google, and Facebook.

Following the US House of Representative’s final hearing on the topic of big tech antitrust, a draft response claims that the as-yet unreleased proposals call for the breakup of Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google.

According to Reuters, Republican Congressman Ken Buck has responded to the forthcoming report, criticizing its main conclusions. “This proposal is a thinly veiled call to break up Big Tech firms,” he wrote. “We do not agree with the majority’s approach.”

While Buck writes that he agrees with concerns about Big Tech, he objects to the report’s plan to require companies to delineate a clear “single line of business.” He reportedly points out that Amazon, for example, runs both its ecommerce store and the separate but hugely

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Facebook’s latest integrations with Instagram could make it harder for regulators to break up the company

Today, let’s talk about a couple little things that could turn into a big thing.

In January 2019, Mike Isaac reported a noteworthy development about Facebook at the New York Times. In the months to come, he said, Facebook would unify the technical infrastructure powering Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp. To the user, these changes would be invisible. But to Facebook itself, there were clear strategic imperatives to merge the apps. Among them: the move came just as the US government was beginning to consider an effort to break the company up.

In the nearly two years since, the government’s effort has accelerated. On September 15th, the Wall Street Journal reported that an antitrust case against the company could come by the end of the year. But Facebook’s effort to puree its family of apps into a single software smoothie on the back end has picked up as well. And

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Providing diverse and complete solutions, TEL continues to break through advanced semiconductor process technology

Providing diverse and complete solutions, TEL continues to break through advanced semiconductor process technology

In addition to process technology which enhances the performance of semiconductor devices by scaling, 3D and heterogeneous integration has led to the development of various new structures and new materials. Although these trends have brought increasingly severe challenges to semiconductor production equipment suppliers, more opportunities and innovations have also been created.

According to Roger Chang, Executive Vice President of Tokyo Electron Taiwan, Tokyo Electron Limited with 58 years of history have developed multiple leading edge products such as Coater/Developer, Etch, Thin film deposition, Cleaning, Wafer prober. With strong position in the photoresist Coater/Developer market, TEL has taken 100% market share of Coater/Developer for EUV in high volume manufacturing as the industry moves into the new EUV era.

With this advantage, TEL will continue to strengthen each product and provide integrated process solutions to meet the needs

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How A Break From Lord Sugar Changed The Fortunes Of This Young Entrepreneur

It takes hard work, determination, and talent to achieve startup success, but getting an early break from a major business leader like Lord Alan Sugar can be a real game changer, as entrepreneur Ross Testa, founder of video and social media agency 3 Heads Agency discovered.

At school, Testa had no idea where his future career lay. While his friends pursued predictable routes into law, medicine, and journalism, he admits that his plans were non-existent. Everything changed when, aged 18, he decided to organize a charity week at school to raise money for the Teenage Cancer Trust after one of his closest friends, Ellis Haggith, was diagnosed with leukemia.

He says: “I was determined to make it a success, and it was: the campaign raised just under £5,000 in one week. We had support from a lot of businesses and celebrities, and the experience made

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Facebook wants to make AI better by asking people to break it

Benchmarks can be very misleading, says Douwe Kiela at Facebook AI Research, who led the team behind the tool. Focusing too much on benchmarks can mean losing sight of wider goals. The test can become the task.

“You end up with a system that is better at the test than humans are but not better at the overall task,” he says. “It’s very deceiving, because it makes it look like we’re much further than we actually are.”

Kiela thinks that’s a particular problem with NLP right now. A language model like GPT-3 appears intelligent because it is so good at mimicking language. But it is hard to say how much these systems actually understand.

Think about trying to measure human intelligence, he says. You can give people IQ tests, but that doesn’t tell you if they really grasp a subject. To do that you need to talk to them, ask

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