Astronomers capture a black hole shredding star into spaghetti strands

  • Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory observed a black hole sucking in a faraway star, shredding it into thin strands of stellar material.
  • This process, known as “spaghettification,” happens because of black holes’ powerful gravitational force.
  • At 215 million light-years away, this spaghettification process is the closest ever observed by astronomers. 
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Astronomers have captured a rarely-seen event: a flare of light caused by a black hole devouring a nearby star like spaghetti.

Observed in the Eridanus constellation, about 215 million light-years away from Earth, the star’s destruction is the closest such event astronomers have ever observed. 

“When an unlucky star wanders too close to a supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy, the extreme gravitational pull of the black hole shreds the star into thin streams of material,” study author Thomas Wevers, a fellow at the European Southern Observatory in Santiago,

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TIME’s Camera Arrives at ISS to Capture VR Spacewalk

It’s entirely possible you missed it, but on Oct. 2 at 9:16 PM ET, you lifted off for the International Space Station. Just over two days later, you docked successfully—and it’s a good thing you did. You’ve got a spacewalk planned for later this year.

O.K., technically speaking, you didn’t go anywhere at all, and unless you’re actually a highly-trained astronaut, you certainly shouldn’t be planning for a real-deal spacewalk—or extravehicular activity (EVA)—any time soon. But you could very much share in the experience when actual ISS crew members venture outside of the station for one of the most exciting and dangerous experiences an astronaut can have.

That’s because something special was included among the ISS-bound cargo on the uncrewed Cygnus supply vehicle that took off from Wallops Island, Va. earlier this week: the first-ever 3D, virtual reality camera designed to operate in the vacuum of space. It’s the

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Camera Designed by Felix & Paul Studios and TIME Arrives at ISS to Capture First-Ever Virtual Reality Spacewalk

The Daily Beast

Putin Is Facing the Toughest Fight of His Presidency as Former USSR Goes up in Flames

Yesterday, October 7, was Russian President Vladimir Putin’s 68th birthday, and, in keeping with his Soviet-style personality cult, it would normally have been an occasion for Putin to bask in public fanfare. But this year was different. Putin is holed up at his residence outside Moscow, where he has been since early April, avoiding infection from the coronavirus that is again rampant in Russia, while unrest surges in three countries of the former Soviet Union, and France and Germany are pushing for new EU economic sanctions against Russia because of the poisoning of Russian democrat Alexei Navalny.In honor of Putin’s birthday, the Russian news agency Tass released the final episode of a series entitled 20 Questions with Vladimir Putin, a special interview project to commemorate Putin’s twenty years as leader. In

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Lego-like assembly of zeolitic membranes improves carbon capture — ScienceDaily

Zeolites are porous minerals that occur both naturally but also are being synthesized artificially. Because they are stable and durable, zeolites are used for chemical catalysis, purification of gases and liquids, and even in medical applications such as drug delivery and blood-clotting powders, e.g. the QuickClot trauma bandages used in the US military.

Zeolites used in gas separation are usually produced as membranes. The state-of-the-art zeolitic membranes are manufactured by a lengthy and complex crystallization process. Unfortunately, this method has proved difficult to reproduce. Also, it lacks in producing efficient gas-separation membranes, especially when it comes to the separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which is necessary for pre-combustion carbon capture from power plants.

A team of chemical engineers led by Kumar Agrawal at EPFL Valais Wallis have now successfully simplified the chemistry behind zeolite membrane synthesis, making it simple, reproducible, and scalable. The achievement of the longstanding goal is

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Automatic Identification and Data Capture Market worth $80.3 billion by 2025

CHICAGO, Sept. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The report “Automatic Identification and Data Capture Market with COVID-19 Impact Analysis by Product (Barcodes, Smart Cards, OCR Systems, RFID Products, and Biometric Systems), Offering (Hardware, Software, and Services), Vertical, and Geography – Global Forecast to 2025″, published by MarketsandMarkets™, is expected to grow from USD 40.1 billion in 2020 to USD 80.3 billion by 2025; it is expected to grow at a CAGR of 14.9% during 2020–2025. Key factors fueling the growth of this market include growing e-commerce industry globally; increasing use of smartphones for QR code scanning and image recognition; rising adoption of AIDC solutions due to their ability to minimize queuing and transaction time and provide greater convenience to users in making small-value payments; and surging adoption of AIDC solutions by banking and financial institutions to ensure customer safety and security, along with data privacy. An increasing number of

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Fortem Technologies Adds New Capabilities to Autonomously Capture a Wider Array of Drone Threats, Including Faster Moving Fixed Wing Drones

Pleasant Grove, UT, Sept. 16, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Fortem Technologies Inc., a leader in airspace security and defense for detecting and defeating dangerous drones, announced today advancements to its SkyDome® System software that allow the Fortem DroneHunter® to autonomously shift into one of three various modes to best defeat a threatening drone. DroneHunter, the world’s premier AI-driven interceptor drone, autonomously determines whether to chase, attack or defend against the threatening drone depending on the drone’s size, speed and trajectory. These advancements allow DroneHunter to pursue and safely capture an even wider range of drone threats including faster fixed wing drones.

When in defense mode, the DroneHunter maneuvers in front of the target drone, anticipating its approach. Once in range, DroneHunter fires the NetGun precisely as the target attempts to pass. The defensive mode position also facilitates a radically faster detect-to-capture-time, as the time previously required to get behind the

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Scientists capture light in a polymeric quasicrystal

Scientists manage to capture light in a polymeric quasicrystal
Credit: Ant Rozetsky

ITMO University scientists have conducted several experiments to investigate polymeric quasicrystals that ultimately confirmed their initial theory. In the future, the use of quasicrystals may open up new possibilities for laser and sensor design. This paper was published in Advanced Optical Materials.


Crystals are solids with a periodic structure, i.e., when atoms are displaced, they take the exact places of other atoms, the latter occupied before the shift. This fact was scientifically proved at the beginning of the 20th century. It gave rise to modern solid-state physics and also laid the foundation for the development of semiconductor technologies.

Mikhail Rybin, associate professor at ITMO’s Department of Physics and Engineering, says, “Computers, smartphones, LED bulbs, lasers—everything we can’t imagine our day-to-day lives without was designed thanks to the fact that we understand the nature of the crystalline structure of semiconductor materials. The theory of periodic structures allows

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Death counts fail to capture full mortality effects of COVID-19, study finds — ScienceDaily

More than 200,000 people in the U.S. have died from COVID-19. Some argue that statistic is inaccurate due to inconsistencies in how deaths are being reported. But researchers from the University of South Florida claim that even if those deaths have been correctly measured, the number doesn’t fully convey the true mortality effects of COVID-19.

A study published in the Journal of Public Health finds that for each person in the U.S. who died after contracting COVID-19, an average of nearly 10 years of life had been lost. Researchers claim “years of life lost” is a more insightful measure than death count since it accounts for the ages of the deceased. The tool is often used to determine the effects of non-communicable disease, drug misuse and suicide. They believe “years of life lost” is especially appropriate given the range of ages at which individuals have died of COVID-19.

“While death

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ExxonMobil Expands Agreement with Global Thermostat, Sees Promise in Direct Air Capture Technology

IRVING, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–ExxonMobil and Global Thermostat have expanded their joint development agreement following 12 months of technical evaluation to determine the feasibility and potential scalability of Global Thermostat’s technology that captures carbon dioxide (CO2) directly from the air.

“ExxonMobil’s scientists continue to research technology options aimed at reducing emissions at scale, which are key to achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement,” said Vijay Swarup, vice president of research and development for ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company. “Our work with Global Thermostat has shown promising signs in the development of direct air capture technologies that could be brought to scale. We look forward to seeing how new materials might accelerate this potential, while also continuing our research that captures CO2 from power generation facilities.”

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change has said that CO2 capture, use and storage “is a key technology

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