Fancy cars, fine dining, creator mansions, cash: Triller is shelling out for talent

When talk of a possible TikTok ban began in July, the leaders of a small social video app called Triller saw a growth opportunity.

To attract users, the company set its sights on TikTok’s biggest names. Some of the Sway Boys, a group of TikTok influencers, had been toying with the idea of building their own app to compete with TikTok, but after a discussion with Ryan Kavanaugh, the majority owner of Triller and a veteran entertainment executive, they decided the platform could be good for them.

Triller offered the creators a deal: Tell your audience on TikTok that you’re moving to Triller, and we’ll give you equity and roles within the company. You can still post on TikTok, they were told, but only if you post on Triller more frequently. In turn, of the Sway Boys, Josh Richards, 18, was named Triller’s chief strategy officer, and Griffin Johnson, 21,

Read More

The Future Of Electric Cars May Be Skateboards

When it comes to the future of electric vehicles, should automakers worry less about batteries and drivetrains and more about what gets built right on top of them? Israeli startup REE Automotive thinks so. It has now prototyped a range of heavy-duty skateboard-style beds capable of carrying up to 7 tons for car and van designers to add their own ideas on top of.



a car parked on a beach: When it comes to the future of electric vehicles, should automakers worry less about batteries and drivetrains and more about what gets built right on top of them? Israeli startup REE Automotive thinks so. It has now prototyped a range of heavy-duty skateboard-style beds capable of carrying up to 7 tons for car and van […]


© Provided by The Drive
When it comes to the future of electric vehicles, should automakers worry less about batteries and drivetrains and more about what gets built right on top of them? Israeli startup REE Automotive thinks so. It has now prototyped a range of heavy-duty skateboard-style beds capable of carrying up to 7 tons for car and van […]

One of the fun things about electric motors is that they’re really small and don’t need to aspirate, so you can put them in all

Read More

Tesla Model 3 Price Too High? Dirt-Cheap Used Electric Cars Can Be Good Deals

The used EV has arrived.

It was only nine years ago that the first won’t-break-the-bank electric cars arrived.

Those non-Tesla EVs — like the Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt — weren’t priced at $80,000 like the Model S and the first- and second- generations of those cars have been hitting the used car market over the last several years.

And with a Long Range 2020 Tesla Model 3 starting at about $47,000, “dirt cheap” for an EV is anything under $20,000.

A couple of the better sites for used EVs are MYEV and CarGurus.

Most of the used EVs cited below are first- and second-generation electrics that were sold roughly between 2011 and 2017.

Note: all prices are based on a used vehicle

Read More

The Tech That Might Help Cyclists and Cars Coexist Safely

On the desolate streets of Manhattan during the bleak early days of the pandemic, Rosemary Sigelbaum found that riding a bicycle to work at Lenox Hill Hospital offered a desperately needed respite from the stress of 12-hour days witnessing the worst of the coronavirus’s frightening effects.

“It was quiet, and on my way home it gave me time to decompress,” Ms. Sigelbaum said of her commute between the Upper East Side and her home on the Lower East Side.

Those empty avenues of late March have given way to the city’s usual cacophony of traffic, just as more people are discovering the advantages of cycling to work: no crowded subways, buses or shared taxis. Bicycle companies have posted out-of-stock notices for the first time in years. Sales in May skyrocketed 103 percent compared with a year earlier, according to the NPD Group, a research firm.

But as all those new

Read More

One of Ford’s biggest design challenges of future is not about cars

Headquarters of the Ford Motor Company in Dearborn, Michigan. In a recent survey of 30,000 workers, the auto giant found a majority never want to come back to the office five days a week, and it is taking that data seriously.

James Leynse | Corbis | Getty Images

The era of massive highways and major commutes was a boon to car companies like Ford, but now the automakers find themselves in the unexpected position of designing a future of work that could work against that 20th century American approach to employment.

San Francisco officials are newly looking at remote work as a potential solution for climate change, not just a short-term fix for coronavirus, with the elimination of commutes a source of emissions reduction. The car company’s thinking may be along different lines, but over the past few months, Ford surveyed over 30,000 of its workers about working remotely and

Read More

This Startup Has A Plan To Build The Missing Link For Self-Driving Cars

For several years, technology companies have dangled the promise of a lidar sensor with no moving parts that is also small and cheap enough to embed on several key places of a vehicle. These robust, solid-state sensors are one of many essential components auto manufacturers need before they unleash self-driving vehicles on the market. But while they’re not the only variable of the autonomous vehicle equation that needs to be solved, lidars are an important—and redundant—tool needed to help vehicles “see” in a range of weather and lighting conditions.

Several Bay Area startups are angling to be the first to bring solid-state lidar to market, and yesterday Ouster became the latest Silicon Valley company to announce that it has developed a compact lidar with no moving parts that can be mass-produced at an affordable price. The catch? Like

Read More

Ninety Percent of U.S. Cars Must Be Electric by 2050 to Meet Climate Goals

The United States is not expected to electrify passenger cars fast enough to stay on track with the Paris climate accord’s goal of limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius, according to a new study.

Published in the journal Nature Climate Change yesterday, the study by engineers at the University of Toronto concludes that 90% of light-duty cars on American roads would need to be electric by 2050 to keep the transportation sector in line with climate mitigation targets.

That might mean requiring all of the nation’s new car sales to be electric as early as 2035, the state target established by California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) in an announcement last week.

The prospect of a national ban on gasoline-fueled cars emerged throughout the Democratic primaries, where several candidates proposed a 100% EV sales policy for 2035 or earlier. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden favors the idea of phasing out

Read More

Tesla’s new battery technology could drive down cost of electric cars, company says

Tesla has announced new, internally-produced batteries for its electric cars, signaling a major shift from the automaker that, if successful, could significantly reduce the cost of electric vehicles.



a screen shot of Elon Musk: Elon Musk conducts Tesla’s “Battery Day” event outside its production facility in Freemont, Calif., Sept. 22, 2020.


© Courtesy of Tesla
Elon Musk conducts Tesla’s “Battery Day” event outside its production facility in Freemont, Calif., Sept. 22, 2020.

“I think it’s the way all electric cars in the future will be made,” said CEO Elon Musk at Tesla’s “Battery Day” event outside its production facility in Freemont, California, on Tuesday.

Tesla’s new battery cell features a “tabless” design, which the company claims will provide five times the energy, six times the power, and 16% more range compared to its old battery cell.

The company’s current vehicles use batteries sourced from suppliers like Panasonic, where the energy stored in the battery pack is transferred to the car’s drivetrain via a conductive metal tab.

The new battery pack accomplishes the same

Read More

Electrifying California Cars Could Crush the Grid, or Save It

(Bloomberg) — Electrifying all new cars in California could be an immense burden on the state’s struggling power grid — or a whole new line of defense against blackouts.

It all depends on the time of day vehicles charge.

Governor Gavin Newsom’s executive order this week to phase out sales of new gasoline-powered cars by 2035 could add millions of electric vehicles to roads, driving up power demand as much as 9.5% in the next decade and 25% by 2035, according to estimates.

That could be a nightmare in a state where power supplies can be so tight on summer evenings that officials ordered rolling blackouts last month to prevent the system from collapsing during a heat wave. If millions of cars plug in at sundown, too, the problem may explode.



a car parked in a parking lot: California To Ban New Gasoline Cars By 2035, A First In U.S.


© Bloomberg
California To Ban New Gasoline Cars By 2035, A First In U.S.

A person wearing a protective

Read More

Will California Phase Out Oil-Fired Cars?

Will California’s ban on petroleum fueled vehicles by 2035 prove to be sound policy? As I said in a 2013 column on California vehicle mandates, insanity is doing the same thing repeatedly and expecting a different result. Past vehicle mandates have been abandoned as unworkable, and the recent electricity crisis has been blamed in part on the state’s Renewable Portfolio Standards. Could this time be different?

The reality of electric vehicle technology is that costs have come down and performance has increased significantly from the days of the ill-fated zero emission vehicle mandate that California and a number of other states adopted in the 1990s. The costs of lithium-ion batteries, which well out-perform the earlier lead-acid batteries, have come down sharply, something like 80-90% in the past decade.

Which begs the question, if electric vehicles have improved so much and are still only 5% of

Read More