Call Of Duty: Black Ops Cold War — How It’s Changing For The Cross-Play Beta Weekend

The first public beta for Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War ran this past weekend on PS4, and now developer Treyarch has outlined some of the changes in the pipeline for the next beta. The second beta is a much bigger one, as it’s coming to Xbox One and PC as well, and there will be cross-platform multiplayer support.

Weekend 2 players can expect a series of changes, including the team deathmatch score limit rising from 75 to 100 “for better match pacing,” as well as a change to the Duster Stock attachment that will slow down sliding speed.

The cooldown on the Spy Plane scorestreak has been increased to lessen the experience of having too many of them in the sky at the same time from different players.

There have also been some general changes to improve the experience, such as join-in-progress now preventing players from joining a

Read More

How New Technology Is Changing How Brand Productions Are Cast

Article Image

Photo Source: Unsplash courtesy Annie Spratt

Times, they are a-changin’—particularly in the casting world. 

COVID-19 has catalyzed a massive shift in the way brands, content creators, and casting directors find talent, and in a socially distanced world, as well as a generally globally connected one, utilizing technology is the only way to keep the cameras rolling.

“As a casting and production professional, what are some interesting ways you can take your current productions and alter them to fit a remote format? How can you continue to develop fresh content that’s impactful during such an unpredictable time?” Sabrina Safran, director of casting and talent development at Hearst, told Backstage. “It’s up to all of us to collaborate in a way that makes sense and keep creating content that matters. And one thing to remember that’s most important is that we’re all in this together.”

Here’s how new technology is changing

Read More

Hinge CEO on how online dating is changing during coronavirus

  • Since the start of the pandemic, dating apps have seen a spike in usage.
  • But users also have new concerns that these apps have to address. 
  • Business Insider spoke with the founder and CEO of Hinge, Justin McLeod, on how coronavirus has changed the face of dating for good and what the company is doing about it. 
  • Hinge is taking steps like launching a partnership with mental health space Headspace and pushing for more video-based dates – which could stay popular even after it’s safe to meet in person. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The way people meet and date has changed dramatically since the onset of the pandemic, and dating apps like Hinge are trying to keep up with the shift. 

People are going on more dates than ever before, but they’re not meeting up as frequently, Justin McLeod, founder and CEO of the dating app Hinge,

Read More

How tech and intuitive design are changing physically-demanding workplaces

  • The technology that underpins the buildings we live and work in is changing.
  • Intuitive design that takes the strain off our bodies is also important. 



a tractor parked in the dirt: The Cat 950M Wheel Loaders have been fitted with joysticks instead of steering wheels.


© Provided by CNBC
The Cat 950M Wheel Loaders have been fitted with joysticks instead of steering wheels.

From voice-activated televisions to monitoring devices that automate lighting in offices, the technology that underpins the buildings we live and work in is changing.

Loading...

Load Error

This shift is also apparent in the way buildings are constructed and how industrial sites are run, with tweaks in design and new pieces of technology having a significant effect on day-to-day activities.

Ergonomics — also known as “human factors” — refers to how people interact with the systems around them, and is of increasing importance in all workplaces, including physically-demanding industries.

One example of a seemingly small change which has had a big impact can be found at a recycling

Read More

Your office will look very different when you return. Here’s what is changing

Transforming workspaces into IoT-enabled ‘smart’ offices can ensure that physical workplaces remain relevant in the new hybrid working landscape, according to tech analysts.

coronavirus

When offices do reopen, there are likely to be some big changes.

Image: iStock/halfpoint

Navigating the return to the office, whenever that might be, will a tricky matter for organizations. At the same time as businesses are looking to reduce the amount of physical office space they own, organizations will also have to grapple with the challenge of ensuring post-COVID workspaces remain valuable to both them and their employees.

According to a report by tech analyst Forrester, the dramatic increase in remote working has forced many organizations to begin rethinking their office strategy, and how they can maximize the strategic value of
physical workspaces in the post-COVID era.

The success of these plans will largely hinge on making sure workers feel safe when they return to their

Read More

Twitter Considers Changing Misinformation Labels

Twitter  (TWTR) – Get Report is reassessing how its misinformation labels appear and reach users, the microblogging site’s head of site integrity told a news service.

The San Francisco social-media company currently attaches small blue notices to false tweets.

It is assessing how to make these signals more “overt” and “direct,” Twitter’s Yoel Roth told Reuters.

Roth made no mention of whether the changes would be implemented before the Nov. 3 U.S. election.

The changes will include testing a reddish-magenta color that is more visible, Roth told the news service.

Twitter reduces the reach of tweets that it labels for false content by limiting their visibility and not recommending them in search results, Reuters reported.

Feedback from users tells the company that they want to know whether an account has been repeatedly labeled, Roth said. Twitter will consider whether to flag users who constantly post false information, he

Read More

Call me! How technology is changing our hand gestures | Science

Name: Hand gestures.

Age: Older than language.

Appearance: Demonstrative hand signals encoding commonly understood meanings.

I don’t follow you. Can you give me an example of what you’re talking about? Certainly: placing a fist alongside your head, thumb and little finger extended, in the manner of a man trying to scratch his chin and his ear at the same time.

OK. And what does that mean? Can’t you guess?

Does it mean: “My ear and my chin both itch”? No! It means: “Call me.”

What? How do you figure that? It’s miming holding a phone – the thumb is the earpiece, the little finger is the mouthpiece, and the fist is pretending to grab the long bit in between.

You’ve seen a phone, right? I guess it wouldn’t make much sense if you’ve only ever used a flat, rectangular mobile.

You’re correct, it wouldn’t. Give me a better example.

Read More

Inuvo’s IntentKey Uncovers Changing Home Renovation Audience Behaviors in Midst of COVID-19 for National Home Improvement Retailer Client

The IntentKey Discovers Audiences Willing to Travel Two Hours for Home Renovation Supplies

LITTLE ROCK, Ark., Sept. 28, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Inuvo, Inc. (NYSE American: INUV), a leading provider of marketing technology, powered by artificial intelligence (AI) that serves brands and agencies, today announces how the IntentKey artificial intelligence (AI) technology has built strong brand awareness with new audiences for a national home improvement retailer client by uncovering changing audience behaviors in the midst of COVID-19.

The pandemic has created a boom in home remodeling, as more time at home has changed the way people need their homes to function. Houzz reported a 58% increase in professional referrals for projects year-over-year. In a Porch.com survey, more than 75% of consumers said they plan to take on a new project within the next 12 months. CNBC coverage also boasts record high equity is giving homeowners the financial flexibility and

Read More

Twitter is changing how it crops photos after reports of racial bias

  • Twitter said it is limiting its reliance on machine learning that helps it decide which part of a photo to crop on its platform.
  • Online users have reported racial bias on the social media firm’s image cropping tool, which automatically focuses on the part of a photo it thinks the viewer will find most interesting.
  • One Twitter user recently highlighted how the face of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who is white, was routinely centered in automatic image crops, while that of former President Barack Obama was cut out.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Twitter is making changes to its photo cropping function after an investigation into racial bias in the software, the company said on Thursday.

The announcement comes after users on the platform repeatedly showed that the tool — which uses machine learning to choose which part of an image to crop based on what

Read More

Full-stack, multilayered security features for a changing world

Remote is the new rule

The trend towards remote working has been steady for some time, and recent events are accelerating that pace. According to 2012 Gallup research, 39% of the U.S. workforce was working off-site at least part-time. By 2016, that number had risen to 43%1. It’s fair to assume that if the question was asked in 2020, that number will have grown dramatically.

While it’s impossible to predict what happens next, it’s clear that remote working will now be more permanent in many organizations. Whether it’s employees working from home, students engaging in distance learning, or family and friends catching up using web and video conferencing, there is in fact a new normal emerging: remote connectivity and collaboration.

New paradigm, new problems: securing the modern workplace

These cultural and organizational shifts have made confidential personal and business data a more attractive target for cybercriminals. Since traditional

Read More