Effects of poverty on childhood development seen in children as young as 5 — ScienceDaily

In a nationwide study, UCLA researchers have found that health inequities can be measured in children as young as 5 years old. The research, published in Health Affairs, contributes to a growing body of literature finding that children of color who are also poor face greater health inequities than their white counterparts.

Researchers trained kindergarten teachers in 98 school districts across the United States to administer the Early Development Instrument (EDI), a measure of children’s physical, social, emotional and language development.

The assessment was administered to more than 185,000 kindergarteners from 2010 to 2017. After analyzing and correlating the results according to where the children lived, the investigators found that 30 percent of children in the lowest-income neighborhoods were vulnerable in one or more domains of health development, compared to 17 percent of children in higher-income settings.

The researchers also found that income-related differences in developmental vulnerability varied substantially

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Children use make-believe aggression and violence to manage bad-tempered peers — ScienceDaily

Children are more likely to introduce violent themes into their pretend play, such as imaginary fighting or killing, if they are with playmates whom peers consider bad-tempered, new research suggests.

Academics from the University of Cambridge believe that the tendency for children to introduce aggressive themes in these situations — which seems to happen whether or not they are personally easy to anger — may be because they are ‘rehearsing’ strategies to cope with hot-headed friends.

The finding comes from an observational study of more than 100 children at a school in China, who were asked to play with toys in pairs. Children whose play partners were considered bad-tempered by their peers were 45% more likely to introduce aggressive themes into their pretend play than those whose partners were reckoned to be better at controlling their temper.

Importantly, however, a child’s own temperament did not predict the level of make-believe

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The Royal Children Speak on Camera for the First Time in Adorable Video

From Cosmopolitan

  • Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis just appeared in an adorable new video.

  • Kensington Royal posted the cute video to their social media accounts.

The royal trio! It’s not every day that we get to hear Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis’ little voices. So, when Kensington Royal released a cute video of Prince William and Kate Middleton’s three kids, we took notice.

The three children appeared with TV icon and natural historian, Sir David Attenborough, to ask him questions about nature. First up was 7-year-old George, who asked, “What animal do you think will become extinct next?” David said that he hopes no more animals will become extinct. Next up was 5-year-old Charlotte, who said, “I like spiders, do you like spiders?” He answered that he loves them (why he loves them is still tbd).

Lastly, 2-year-old Louis asked, “What animal do you like?” David

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Nuclear magnetic resonance insights set stage for next-gen targeted cancer therapies for adults and children

Nuclear magnetic resonance insights set stage for next-gen targeted cancer therapies for adults and children
First author Tao Xie, Ph.D., and corresponding author Charalampos Babis Kalodimos, Ph.D., chair, both of the Department of Structural Biology at St. Jude, have visualized previously unknown structures of the ABL kinase through the use of an NMR spectrometer. Credit: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have visualized previously unknown structures of the ABL kinase, offering insight for designing the next generation of targeted therapies for adult and childhood cancers. The work will advance understanding of treatment resistance to targeted cancer therapies. The findings appear as an advance online publication today in Science.

Central to this achievement was the United States’ most powerful nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer, which was installed at St. Jude in 2019. Just as microscopes enable scientists to peer inside a cell, NMR spectroscopy lets researchers visualize previously invisible, or undetectable, molecular structures that cannot be seen with other

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Remote neuropsychology tests for children shown effective, study finds — ScienceDaily

Administering neuropsychology evaluations to children online in the comfort of their own homes is feasible and delivers results comparable to tests traditionally performed in a clinic, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers and Children’s Health indicates. The finding, published online this month in the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, could help expand access to specialists and reduce barriers to care, particularly as the popularity of telemedicine grows during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Patients with a variety of neurological disorders require periodic neuropsychological evaluations to track their cognition, academic skills, memory, attention, and other variables. Typically, these tests are done in clinics, often by specialists in these disorders.

However, explains Lana Harder, Ph.D., ABPP, associate professor of psychiatry and neurology at UTSW, many patients travel hundreds of miles to access specialists for their care — a major expense and inconvenience that can also cause fatigue and potentially influence the results.

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New education ‘hubs’ for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close

New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said.

Special schools for Deaf children have had an important role in the Deaf community, acting as places people can meet and learn BSL together. But the move to inclusive education and new technology such as cochlear implants means most children with hearing loss are now educated in mainstream schools.

Deaf education should be remodelled to replace the role previously provided by specialist schools which have closed, Dr Hannah Anglin-Jaffe argues in a study in the British Education Research Journal.

Dr Anglin-Jaffe proposes Deaf education and support could be run in the same way as existing community provision in schools and other social spaces such as libraries or community centres. These hubs could act as a new iteration of the special school for the Deaf and host

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Less than half of children received any therapy within 3 months — ScienceDaily

Children are struggling with mental health issues more now than perhaps ever before, though the treatment available — therapy, drugs, or both — differs widely from state to state.

Using a national database of insurance claims, Princeton University researchers investigated the type of treatment adolescents — most of whom were around the average age of 12 and suffering from anxiety or depression — receive after a first episode of mental illness.

Less than half of children received any therapy within three months, and 22.5% of children received only drug therapy, the researchers report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Of the children receiving drugs, 45% were prescribed strong, addictive drugs in the benzodiazepine class (like Valium or Xanax), tricyclic antidepressants, or drugs that were not FDA-approved for use in children as a first line of treatment.

The findings occur even in ZIP codes that are

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