China’s Xi promises changes to promote tech center Shenzhen

BEIJING (AP) — President Xi Jinping promised Wednesday new steps to back development of China’s biggest tech center, Shenzhen, amid a feud with Washington that has disrupted access to U.S. technology and is fueling ambitions to create Chinese providers.

Xi made the remarks in a speech marking the 40th anniversary of the former fishing village adjacent to Hong Kong being declared the first area for the ruling party to allow tightly controlled free enterprise.

He promised to ease regulations to encourage new industries. He also called for “the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation” and “optimizing and upgrading production,” a reference to official ambitions to become a global competitor in fields from telecoms and bio-tech to electric cars and renewable energy.

Companies in Shenzhen including Huawei, a maker of smartphones and telecom network equipment, play a key role in party plans to transform China into a leader in telecoms, electric

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In the shadow of TikTok, China’s apps quietly hoover up downloads

While SHEIN has its origins in China it is one of the biggest shopping apps in the United States, SHAREit has been banned in India despite being massively popular elsewhere, and Likee is chasing TikTok — but desperate to avoid a similar fate.

China’s app makers are having to be agile in a world where key markets have turned hostile to their country’s tech. 

They are either going under the radar in territories where the war over privacy, security and geopolitics rages — or are moving to friendlier markets to win millions of downloads.

Experts say that could signal an unstoppable rise for China’s smart and responsive tech, depending on the long-term damage that security and diplomatic squabbles may bring to the Made in China brand.

For now, the strategies of Chinese-owned platforms — quick reflexes to their customer base and aggressive social media marketing — are winning fans in

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Here’s a first glimpse of China’s digital yuan



Yuan bank notes.


© Provided by Quartz
Yuan bank notes.

China’s long-anticipated digital yuan has arrived in the wallets of some ordinary citizens.

Beijing began exploring a digital currency in 2014, with the project going into high gear in 2017—the same year the country cracked down on cryptocurrency trading. The digital yuan is very much not a cryptocurrency; like the regular yuan, it is under the control of the People’s Bank of China, and will be rolled out with the help of the country’s largest commercial banks. After conducting small-scale trials earlier this year, China began its largest test yet yesterday, with 200 yuan ($30) worth of the virtual money issued to 50,000 citizens in the southern tech hub of Shenzhen through a lottery.

The pilot comes as the Chinese president Xi Jinping prepares to visit Shenzhen tomorrow (Oct. 14) to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the country’s establishment of its first special

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China’s Mars Probe Tianwen-1 Sends Home Selfies Captured 15 Million Miles From Earth

KEY POINTS

  • The CNSA released new selfies of Tianwen-1 captured 15 million miles away from Earth
  • The Mars probe took images of itself using a tiny camera ejected from the spacecraft
  • Tianwen-1 is expected to reach the red planet in February 2021

Talk about a clever way to take self-portraits in space! Tianwen-1 has snapped some selfies while in outer space using a camera ejected from its spacecraft.

While on its way to Mars, Tianwen-1 sent home new images of itself captured 15 million miles away from Earth. They were released by the China National Space Administration earlier this month as part of the country’s national day celebrations.

The small camera the Mars probe used to snap selfies had wide-angle lenses on each side and took one photo every second. It sends the images it takes to Tianwen-1, which would then transmit the pictures to Earth.

One of the many

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China’s Quiet Experiment Let Millions View Long-Banned Websites

(Bloomberg) — In a quiet experiment of just two weeks, China provided millions of people access to long-forbidden foreign websites like YouTube and Instagram. The trial appears to signal the Communist government is moving toward giving the country’s citizens greater access to the global internet — while still attempting to control who sees what.



a person wearing a hat: An attendee uses her smartphone ahead of the keynote speech at Tencent Holdings Ltd.'s WeChat Open Class Pro conference in Guangzhou, China, on Monday, Jan. 15, 2018.


© Bloomberg
An attendee uses her smartphone ahead of the keynote speech at Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s WeChat Open Class Pro conference in Guangzhou, China, on Monday, Jan. 15, 2018.

The Tuber browser-app, backed by government-linked 360 Security Technology Inc., appeared without fanfare late September and offered for the first time in years a way to view long-banned websites from Facebook Inc. to Google and the New York Times, albeit sanitized versions. Chinese users rejoiced in a newfound ability to directly peruse long-blocked content from a mobile browser without an illegal virtual private network or VPN.

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Gaming will be a frontline in China’s censorship drive | Opinion

Rob Fahey

Contributing Editor

Friday 9th October 2020

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On the scale of grand industry scandals, a few short phrases being censored in the in-game chat client of a free-to-play RPG seems like it ought to be in real “storm in a teacup” territory.

Indeed, it’s deeply unlikely that very many of the millions of players of Genshin Impact — a Breath of the Wild inspired RPG for PC, PS4 and mobile, which is quickly shaping up to be one of the most internationally successful titles to have been developed in mainland China thus far — will ever really notice that the game does the text equivalent of bleeping them out should they choose to mention places like Taiwan or Hong Kong, or a number of other phrases, some of them surprisingly innocuous. Even among those who do notice, the vast majority will shrug it off; it’s not

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China’s Games Streaming Giants Huya and DouYu to Merge

China’s two largest games live streaming companies Huya and DouYu, both of which have U.S. share listings, are to merge. The deal was initiated by social media, games and streaming giant Tencent.

According to terms published on Monday, the shareholders of the two companies will come out roughly equal, and Huya will make an all stock offer for the shares of DouYu. Reuters calculates that DouYu is valued at $6 billion by the deal terms.

Huya CEO Dong Rongjie and his DouYu’s Chen Shaojie, will be co-CEOs of the combined company.

At the same time, it has also been agreed that Tencent will sell its own game live streaming business Penguin eSports for $500 million, after the Huya-DouYu deal is completed. That will enable a three-way consolidation of the sector.

Assuming that the deal receives regulatory approval and closes in the first half of 2021, the merged company will be

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China’s digital yuan tests leap forward in Shenzhen

Shenzhen, known for its maker community and manufacturing resources, is taking the lead in trialing China’s digital yuan.

Last week, the city issued 10 million yuan worth of digital currency to 50,000 randomly selected residents who applied. The government doled out the money through mobile “red envelopes,” a tool designed to digitize the custom of gifting money in red packets and first popularized by WeChat’s e-wallet.

“Red packets are a common way we’ve seen in China Internet companies to spur adoption like what we’ve seen with Tencent WeChat and Alibaba’s Alipay in the early days, when these products were first launched,” Flex Yang, CEO of crypto finance firm Babel Finance, told TechCrunch.

The digital yuan is not to be mistaken as a form of cryptocurrency. Rather, it is issued and managed by the central bank, serving as the statutory, digital version of China’s physical currency and giving Beijing a better

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China’s smaller cities spend the most on video games nationally: Report

People visit the stand of Tencent’s mobile game ‘Glory of Kings’ during the 2020 China Digital Entertainment Expo & Conference (ChinaJoy) at Shanghai New International Expo Center on July 31, 2020 in Shanghai, China.

Zhou You | VCG via Getty Images

SINGAPORE — Video games are booming in China’s smaller cities, with citizens there accounting for more than half of revenue nationally, according to a recent report by Niko Partners.

“76% of gamers in China live in Tier 3-5 cities, accounting for 70% of game revenue,” Niko Partners said in a synopsis of its China Gamers Report.

Cities in China are classified by tiers based loosely on population and economic size. For example, places such as capital Beijing and Shenzhen are generally considered tier-one cities, while lower-tier cities are smaller.

The country is the world’s top game market and will generate an estimated $40.85 billion in revenue this year, according

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App Removed After Helping Users Bypass China’s Great Firewall

(Bloomberg) — An app backed by Chinese cybersecurity giant 360 Security Technology Inc. that helped users vault over Beijing’s Great Firewall was blocked and removed from mobile stores Saturday.



a close up of a light: Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country's largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.


© Bloomberg
Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country’s largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.

The Tuber browser, which let mainland users visit blocked sites from Google to Facebook Inc., stopped functioning Saturday afternoon and could no longer be located on the app store run by Huawei Technologies Co. It was unclear which agency ordered its removal, which came after Chinese users on social media

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