US sets restrictions on China’s biggest chipmaker, citing military fears

US wariness of Chinese tech firms was underlined again Friday, when the Commerce Department sent a letter to companies in the states reportedly telling them they must get a license before exporting certain goods to China’s largest chipmaker, because of concerns about military use of technology.



a traffic light hanging off the side of a building: The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images


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The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images

The Commerce Department said in the letter that exports to Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation “may pose an unacceptable risk of diversion to a military end use in the People’s Republic of China,” according to a Saturday report by The New York Times.

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Last year, the US placed restrictions on companies selling gear to Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei , over concerns about Huawei’s relationship with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.

And popular video app TikTok,

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Amazon appeals product liability ruling to CA Supreme Court, citing ‘potentially vast blast radius’

Amazon argues that it shouldn’t be held liable for defects in products sold by others on its third-party marketplace, even when it holds and ships them from fulfilment centers such as this one. (GeekWire File Photo)

Amazon is asking the California Supreme Court to review an appeals court ruling in a landmark product liability case, seeking to avoid a precedent that would leave the tech giant open to legal claims over defective products sold by third parties through its online marketplace.

The company’s petition for review, filed Tuesday, argues that the appeals court took an “unprecedented leap” when it found that Amazon was not shielded from liability for a replacement laptop battery that allegedly exploded several months after purchase, causing severe injuries to the plaintiff in the suit, Angela Bolger.

“This Court has never extended strict liability to an entity that provides a forum or service used by others to

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