Farming assistant app Agrolly wins IBM’s Call for Code contest

The innovative platform will be a one-stop-shop for farmers seeking out more information on what to plant and when.

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An autonomous combine–again, smaller and lighter than conventional farm machinery–harvesting HFHa’s first crop in September 2017.

Image: HandsFree Hectare

Agrolly, a platform built to help farmers in emerging markets, was chosen as the winner of IBM’s 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge.

Agrolly provides farmers with a bevy of information about weather patterns and crop characteristics, giving them advice on what would be the best thing to plant during certain times of the year. The platform also has ways for farmers to connect with experts as well as ways for them to share information and tools with each other.

During the virtual “2020 Call for Code Awards: A Global Celebration of Tech for Good” event, Agrolly was announced as the winner of the annual competition, which brings together the world’s brightest

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ACCC code sees Google pause Australian rollout of News Showcase

Google has paused the Australian rollout of News Showcase, which is a news-based service pitched by the company as benefiting both publishers and readers.

News Showcase was only announced earlier this month, and when it was initially launched in Germany and Brazil, CEO Sundar Pichai explained the platform was aimed at paying publishers to “create and curate high-quality content for a different kind of online news experience”.

Although Google said it signed several agreements with Australian publishers for News Showcase in June, it has decided to pause its Australian plans as it is not sure if the product would be viable under the impending media bargaining code of practice published by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC).

Google has held firm that it is against the News Media Bargaining Code, saying previously it would force the tech giant to provide users with a “dramatically worse Google Search and YouTube”,

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arXiv now allows researchers to submit code with their manuscripts

Papers with Code today announced that preprint paper archive arXiv will now allow researchers to submit code alongside research papers, giving computer scientists an easy way to analyze, scrutinize, or reproduce claims of state-of-the-art AI or novel advances in what’s possible.

An assessment of the AI industry released a week ago found that only 15% of papers submitted by researchers today publish their code.

Maintained by Cornell University, arXiv hosts manuscripts from fields like biology, mathematics, and physics, and it has become one of the most popular places online for artificial intelligence researchers to publicly share their work. Preprint repositories give researchers a way to share their work immediately, before undergoing what can be a long peer review process as practiced by reputable scholarly journals. Code shared on arXiv will be submitted through Papers with Code and can be found in a Code tab for each paper.

“Having code on

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Copyright, Computer Code Debated In Google-Oracle Court Clash

US Supreme Court justices peppered lawyers for Google and Oracle with questions on computer code and copyright Wednesday in a court clash which could have major ramifications for the technology sector and digital innovation.

Oral arguments were heard in a decade-old legal battle between the two Silicon Valley giants stemming from Oracle’s claim that Google illegally copied parts of the Java programming language to develop its Android mobile operating system.

The case revolves around whether copyright protection should be extended to application software interfaces (APIs), or the bit of code that allow programs and apps to work together, and if so, whether Google’s implementation was a “fair use” of copyrighted material.

In the court session held remotely, Google attorney Thomas Goldstein argued that the practice of reusing software interfaces “is critical to modern interoperable computer software” and allows developers “to write millions of creative applications that are used by more

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Bitcoin’s 12.3M-digit code turned into surreal paintings

Written by Oscar Holland, CNN

Bitcoin may be completely paperless, but one artist has meticulously dragged it into the physical world by hand-painting the cryptocurrency’s 12.3 million-digit founding code across 40 separate paintings.

Working under the project name Robert Alice, artist Ben Gentilli spent three years working on the canvases, which he has collectively titled “Portraits of a Mind.”

Using specialist machinery, he engraved each painting with over 300,000 digits of the complex code underpinning the virtual currency. Each digit was then hand-painted, producing what its creator calls a “digital fingerprint carved out of paint.”

“The core idea of the project was, ‘How do you make something of real cultural value within the Bitcoin sphere?'” Gentilli said via video call. “And for me, the thing I kept coming back to was this code base, because it’s really the very basis of Bitcoin culture.”

The decision to split the work across

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H Code to Sponsor 33rd Annual Hispanic Heritage Awards in Addition to Year-Round Partnership with the Hispanic Heritage Foundation

H Code, the largest Hispanic digital media company in the U.S., today announced its sponsorship of the 33rd Annual Hispanic Heritage Awards, celebrating Latino leadership, impact, and culture. The broadcast of the Awards will be on October 6th on PBS stations and streamed on PBS.org. H Code also supports the mission of the Hispanic Heritage Foundation year-round by amplifying the historical nonprofit’s messages, programs and resources to millions of Latinos across the country.

“H Code is honored to sponsor such a historic celebration and continue our work with the Hispanic Heritage Foundation, an organization whose mission resonates immensely with our own,” says Jonathan Patton, Vice President of Sales at H Code. “We look forward to collectively celebrating Latinos and the individuals that move our country forward every day.”

Created by the White House in 1988, the Hispanic Heritage Awards commemorate the establishment of Hispanic Heritage Month in the United

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Arctic Expedition’s Dress Code Raises Concerns About Sexism in Science

The institute said in its statement that some of its regulations prohibited wearing work or “sport clothing” in public areas. Such rules were intended to ensure people adhered to hygiene and safety standards in public areas like the mess halls and the ship’s bridge, it said. The dress code was discussed again in the context of other rules, the institute said, adding that there was no connection between harassment and “repeated admonitions to adhere to the dress code.”

The institute added, “Women and men participate in our polar expeditions as equals, and are equally supported in their work by the ship’s crews and aircraft crews that we employ.”

As Ms. Harvey’s account spread on social media, it drew outrage among scientists and science journalists, who said it fit with a broader, longstanding pattern of unequal treatment.

Although the inequities faced by women in science-related fields are widely recognized, there is

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GitHub launches code scanning to unearth vulnerabilities early

GitHub is officially launching a new code-scanning tool today, designed to help developers identify vulnerabilities in their code before it’s deployed to the public.

The new feature is the result of an acquisition last year when GitHub snapped up San Francisco-based code analysis platform Semmle; the Microsoft-owned code-hosting platform revealed at the time that it would make Semmle’s CodeQL analysis engine available natively across all open source and enterprise repositories. After several months in beta, code scanning is now rolling out to all developers.

Breaches

It’s estimated that some 60% of security breaches involve unpatched vulnerabilities. Moreover, 99% of all software projects are believed to contain at least one open source component, meaning that dodgy code can have a significant knock-on impact for many companies.

Typically, fixing vulnerabilities requires a researcher to first find the vulnerability and disclose it to the repository maintainer, who fixes the issue and alerts the

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New Research From Accenture and Girls Who Code Outlines Steps to Double the Number of Women in Technology in 10 Years

Joint report reveals just eight percent of women of color say it’s easy to thrive in technology

An inclusive culture is key to unlocking opportunities for women who are studying and working in technology, and holds the potential to double their number over the next 10 years, according to a joint research report by Accenture (NYSE: ACN) and Girls Who Code, an international nonprofit working to close the gender gap in technology.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200929005390/en/

Accenture and Girls Who Code outline how much cultural practices can boost women in technology (Photo: Business Wire)

The report, “Resetting Tech Culture,” analyzed the journey for women in technology from college to mid-career. While there are many reasons women abandon a career in technology, the highest percentage of respondents — 37% — cite company culture as the leading cause.

The research shows that if every company

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Google attacks extreme ways of ACCC news media bargaining code

Google has continued its fight against Australia’s news media bargaining code, this time attacking the final offer arbitration process, known as baseball arbitration, that will be used.

In such a process, rather than parties agreeing to a deal, an arbitrator is presented with a final offer from each side and must select one of the offers presented. Google is arguing that Australia’s old media are asking for sums far in excess of what Google generates from searches related to news, which it says is around AU$10 million in revenue.

“Clearly, both sides have very different ideas of what the prices should be — and asking the arbitrator to pick a ‘final offer’ is an extreme way of resolving that,” Google ANZ chief Mel Silva said in a blog post.

“The reality is that baseball arbitration often fails and doesn’t produce quick outcomes. Independent economists have raised questions about its effectiveness.”

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