OnePlus co-founder Carl Pei reportedly exits company one day ahead of flagship smartphone launch

  • OnePlus co-founder Carl Pei is reportedly leaving the company to start his own venture.
  • The news comes in one day ahead of the launch of OnePlus’ flagship smartphone series — the OnePlus 8T.
  • Neither Pei nor OnePlus have issued an official statement yet.

Co-founders Carl Pei and Pete Lau were the brains behind the operation at OnePlus. 31-year old Pei, might be leaving to start his own company — just one day ahead of the launch of the company’s flagship series OnePlus 8T as well as the Nord N10 series.

Sources told TechCrunch that Pei is not joining Samsung, despite his one-time proposal to do so back in 2015. However, he does have ‘clarity’ on what he wants to do next.

Pei and OnePlus were unavailable to comment on the matter.

Pei’s India connect When the China-based OnePlus was still in its nascent stages, Pei travelled across India — living

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OnePlus co-founder reportedly leaving phone maker for own venture

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OnePlus co-founder Carl Pei


Josh Miller/CNET

The co-founder of Chinese smartphone maker OnePlus has seemingly left the company, according to a report Monday. Carl Pei was absent from an internal memo listing OnePlus’ leadership, Android Police reported citing a screenshot by a Reddit user who suggested that Pei had either stepped down or was removed from the position.

The reported departure comes just ahead of the OnePlus 8T event, which is scheduled for Wednesday. Pei’s is departing OnePlus to start his own venture, according to TechCrunch, although no details about that venture were immediately available.

OnePlus didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

In 2019, OnePlus ranked eighth in the US market with just 0.6% market share, according to Counterpoint Research, but its phone sales more than tripled last year

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US is losing ‘tech cold war with China’ says Ripple co-founder

Speaking at the LA Blockchain Summit conference on October 6, Ripple co-founder, Chris Larsen, slammed the United States for falling behind in the race to design “the next generation of the global financial system.”

The address expanded on some of Larsen’s frustrations with U.S. regulations that has led to the company considering moving to a different jurisdiction.

Larsen argues the U.S. has fallen “woefully behind” in the ongoing “tech cold war with China,” asserting that China’s central government has outpaced American lawmakers in providing legislative clarity, allocating resources, building infrastructure, and fostering innovation in blockchain and other emerging technologies, including big data, surveillance, and A.I.

“China has recognized that those technologies are the keys to who is going to control the next gen financial system […] SWIFT and correspondent banking is not going to be the system we are going to be living with over the next two decades.” 

The

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‘Adults are asleep at the wheel’ in climate crisis, says Varshini Prakash, co-founder of the Sunrise Movement

It’s a good question. We work with a lot of organizations not solely focused on young people, who are really concerned about the climate crisis. But I think for young people, it’s in our bones. We always kind of had this fear of this looming crisis. One of the experiences that defined my childhood was hearing about Hurricane Katrina. I was 12. You know, seeing these images of people on their roof, hearing about bodies just floating downstream. And the government doing nothing to support those communities.

I was probably at the tail end of the generation that hoped that people more powerful and older than us would do what was necessary to stop it. [Laughs.] And when we got to be teenagers and 20-somethings, it became abundantly clear: The adults are asleep at the wheel. Our politicians weren’t doing what was necessary. And if young people didn’t force the

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Unstoppable Domain’s co-founder had this to say about Facebook and the future of free speech

Unstoppable Domains co-founder Bradley Kam believes that neither the anti-encryption bills nor the technology giants present a real threat to the future of the Internet. In his opinion, both, the governments and the giant platforms are helping to usher the era of the decentralized web, he told Cointelegraph:

“There was a narrative in a popular narrative that the Internet was working pretty well, I think even a few years ago, and I thought that narrative is almost completely gone now. And there’s a lot of things there’s the anti-encryption laws you mentioned or Barack Obama getting hacked on Twitter. <...> So I think that broadly speaking, the more that the tech monopolies abuse their power, the better an argument and clearer an argument there is for a decentralized Web tech.”

Technology platforms like Facebook and Twitter have been criticized simultaneously for censorship and not enough censorship. Kam said that the decentralized

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