VOTIS Subdermal Imaging Technologies Licenses Imaging Technology From Columbia University

JERUSALEM, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — VOTIS Subdermal Imaging Technologies, Ltd. announced today that it has licensed an imaging technology from Columbia University. The technology is being used to develop a suite of medical devices to help people with peripheral artery disease, or PAD, to receive an accurate assessment of their condition. In this way PAD patients can receive crucial treatment early, even before they have symptoms. This knowledge will help physicians delay or eliminate the need for debilitating amputation.

The license grants to VOTIS exclusive worldwide rights in and to the intellectual property being licensed, for all medical imaging purposes, including telemedicine. The license includes rights to 10 issued U.S. patents as well as other patents issued and pending worldwide. Terms of the license were not disclosed.

A wound in the foot of a healthy person heals naturally, in part because blood carries oxygen to the site

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Columbia leads effort to develop a quantum simulator

Columbia leads effort to develop a quantum simulator
Columbia is one of 11 institutions nationwide to receive a Phase One National Science Foundation Convergence Accelerator award for quantum technology. The program is designed to foster multidisciplinary, cross-sector research in emerging areas of critical societal importance. Credit: NSF

Quantum technologies—simulators and computers specifically—have the potential to revolutionize the 21st century, from improved national defense systems to drug discovery to more powerful sensors and communication networks.


But the field still needs to make major advances before quantum computing can surpass existing tools to process information and live up to its promise.

A multidisciplinary research team led by Columbia University is in a position to bring quantum technology out of the lab into real-world applications.

The team has received a $1 million National Science Foundation (NSF) Convergence Accelerator award to build a quantum simulator, a device that can solve problems that are difficult to simulate on classical computers. The project includes

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