Coronavirus lockdown 2.0 deepens divisions in Israel

JERUSALEM — When Israel went into lockdown last spring, Jerusalem pub owner Leon Shvartz moved quickly to save his business — shifting to a delivery and takeaway model that kept him afloat throughout the summer. Then came the second lockdown.

With restaurants and shops shuttered again, Shvartz’s business is struggling to survive. He has laid off 16 of his 17 employees.

By contrast, Israeli software maker Bizzabo, which operates in the hard-hit conference-management sector, quickly reinvented itself last spring by offering “virtual events.” It has more than doubled its sales and is expanding its workforce.

Such tales of boom and bust reflect Israel’s growing “digital divide.”

Even before the pandemic, Israel had one of the largest income gaps and poverty rates among developed economies, with a few high earners, mostly in the lucrative high-tech sector, while many Israelis barely get by as civil servants, in service industries or as small

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Thousands of people want to be exposed to coronavirus for science



a close up of a glass with a blue background: Coronavirus Vaccine


© Provided by BGR
Coronavirus Vaccine

  • Coronavirus vaccine research is advancing at an incredible pace, with some of the first results expected by the end of the year.
  • The UK government is actively exploring the idea of starting a challenge trial where volunteers would receive the experimental drug and then the virus.
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) already cleared the controversial testing method, but governments and vaccine makers are still reluctant to embark on research that would expose volunteers to a deadly pathogen.
  • Tens of thousands of people have signed up for challenge trials nonetheless.

There’s hope that vaccines combined with continued precautions (social distancing, hand washing, and face masks) can defeat the COVID-19 pandemic by the end of 2021. While we have no definitive proof that vaccines are effective and safe, there’s plenty of promising evidence to keep the hope alive. First of all, there are hundreds of coronavirus

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Some U.S. doctors flee to New Zealand where the coronavirus outbreak is under control and science is respected

  • Some U.S. based doctors and nurses are fleeing the country because the lack of PPE and coordinated U.S. response made them feel unsafe during the pandemic. 
  • Some have been feeling burned out for years due to the complex U.S. health system.
  • New Zealand, which led with science, has declared victory over Covid-19 yet again and hasn’t reported a positive case in more than a week. 



Jacinda Ardern holding a sign posing for the camera: Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to media at a press conference ahead of a nationwide lockdown at Parliament on March 25, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand.


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Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to media at a press conference ahead of a nationwide lockdown at Parliament on March 25, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand.

Dr. Judy Melinek knew it was time to make a change when she started to fear for her health and safety.

While working as acting chief forensic pathologist for Alameda County in California, she read early reports about a virus in Wuhan, China. By June, after repeatedly sounding the alarm about the need for

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Twitter slaps warning on President Trump tweet claiming coronavirus immunity

US President Trump has become subject to another fact-check warning on social media after claiming immunity to COVID-19.

In a tweet posted on Sunday, the US president claimed that physicians at the White House have given him a clean bill of health, and as a result, he is now “immune” to further infection by the novel coronavirus. 

Trump also claimed he is no longer contagious. 

See also: Twitter places public interest notice on President Trump’s tweet

“A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday,” the tweet reads. “That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!”

After the message was published, Twitter slapped a warning label on the tweet. The microblogging platform says the tweet “violated the Twitter Rules about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to COVID-19.”

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There are currently no concrete indicators that immunity from COVID-19 is

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Coronavirus, QAnon, Trump: Your Monday Briefing

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Good morning.

We’re covering the steep increase in coronavirus cases in Europe, the growing popularity of QAnon among Germany’s far-right fringe and the latest investigation into Trump’s tax returns.

Even Germany, much praised for its testing and contact-tracing capabilities, reported a record 8,000 new infections on Saturday, by far its highest single-day number, though the country’s seven-day average of new daily cases remains far below its spring peak of almost 5,600.

Chancellor Angela Merkel

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Trump claims he is ‘immune’ to coronavirus, but the science is unclear

  • President Donald Trump claimed that he is “immune” to the coronavirus in a Fox News interview with Maria Bartiromo on Sunday.
  • Though experts think that most people develop an immune response after a COVID-19 infection, it’s unclear how strong this response is or how long the protection lasts.
  • There are no indicators that could reliably determine whether Trump is immune to reinfection.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump claims he is immune to the coronavirus, but there’s no way he can be sure of that.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” Trump said in a live Fox News interview with Maria Bartiromo on Sunday. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows.”

Trump also said he had “a protective glow” — a concept which does not appear in medical literature or scientific research about the

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Coronavirus pandemic and election-year politics collide, eroding trust in science

The positive development immediately became entangled in election-year politics, with President Trump repeatedly making false and exaggerated claims about the new therapeutics. He called them a cure, which they’re not. He said he was about to approve them — a premature promise given that the FDA’s career scientists are charged with reviewing the applications.

This has been the 2020 pattern: Politics has thoroughly contaminated the scientific process. The result has been an epidemic of distrust, which further undermines the nation’s already chaotic and ineffective response to the coronavirus.

The White House has repeatedly meddled with decisions by career professionals at the FDA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other science-based agencies. Many of the nation’s leading scientists, including some of the top doctors in the administration, are deeply disturbed by the collision of politics and science and bemoan its effects on public health.

“I’ve never seen anything that closely

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Twitter labels Trump tweet on coronavirus immunity as ‘misleading’

A tweet from President TrumpDonald John TrumpNorth Korea unveils large intercontinental ballistic missile at military parade Trump no longer considered a risk to transmit COVID-19, doctor says New ad from Trump campaign features Fauci MORE claiming that he was now “immune” to COVID-19 after his treatment for the virus last week was tagged by the platform as “misleading” on Sunday.

The tweet in question, posted late Sunday morning, stated that the president received a “total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday.”

“That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!” he continued.

The post was hidden several hours later by Twitter content administrators with a tag

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Hinge CEO on how online dating is changing during coronavirus

  • Since the start of the pandemic, dating apps have seen a spike in usage.
  • But users also have new concerns that these apps have to address. 
  • Business Insider spoke with the founder and CEO of Hinge, Justin McLeod, on how coronavirus has changed the face of dating for good and what the company is doing about it. 
  • Hinge is taking steps like launching a partnership with mental health space Headspace and pushing for more video-based dates – which could stay popular even after it’s safe to meet in person. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The way people meet and date has changed dramatically since the onset of the pandemic, and dating apps like Hinge are trying to keep up with the shift. 

People are going on more dates than ever before, but they’re not meeting up as frequently, Justin McLeod, founder and CEO of the dating app Hinge,

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Trump Says He Is Off Medication for Coronavirus in First On-Camera Interview Since Hospitalization

MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images President Donald Trump

Donald Trump opened up about his hospitalization and coronavirus symptoms during his first on-camera interview on Fox News’ Tucker Carlson Tonight on Friday.

While billed as on virtual on-camera “medical evaluation” by Dr. Marc Siegel, the president, 74, instead answered questions about his time in the hospital and how he is feeling now.

Trump, who was hospitalized for three days after he announced he tested positive for the virus, said that he’s feeling “really good” and has been off medication for eight hours.

Admitting that he didn’t feel very “vital” upon his hospitalization last Friday, Trump said his symptoms included a sore throat and lack of energy.

“I didn’t have a problem with breathing… I had none of that,” Trump told Siegel over a video call from New York.

However, doctors were concerned after a CT scan revealed some congestion on his

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