New evidence suggests it was matter ejected from the Chicxulub crater that led to impact winter

New evidence suggests it was matter ejected from the Chicxulub crater that led to impact winter
A large asteroid (~12 km in diameter) hit Earth 66 million years ago, likely causing the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Credit: Southwest Research Institute/Don Davis

A team of researchers from the U.S., Australia and the U.K. has found evidence that suggests material thrown into the atmosphere by the asteroid that struck the Earth approximately 66 million years ago, and not massive wildfires, led to a mass extinction event. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of sediment from the Chicxulub crater and other ocean areas and what it showed them.


Over the past several decades, Earth scientists have come to believe a large asteroid slammed into the Earth just off the coast of what is now Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula approximately 66 million years ago. The impact of the asteroid strike was so great that it led to a mass extinction

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Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano Is Turning Into A Deadly Crater Lake

Just a few years ago, it was possible to visit Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island of Hawaii, venture near the rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater within the caldera of notoriously active Kilauea volcano at dusk and witness awesome the orange glow of the roiling lava below.

Today the scene is very different. For over a year now, the lava lake that drew visitors for the better part of a decade from 2008 on has been gone. The crater is partially collapsed and a hot water lake has been growing slowly deeper and more voluminous in its place.

During Kilauea’s months-long eruption in 2018, the lava lake drained, the crater deformed and began to crumble under the pressure of repeated earthquakes while lava erupted from fissures in the volcano’s nearby lower east rift zone, destroying a

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Gold miners discover 100 million-year-old meteorite crater Down Under

Gold miners in the Australian Outback recently discovered a gigantic meteorite crater dating to about 100 million years ago, back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth.

Found near the Western Australian town of Ora Banda, the newly dubbed Ora Banda Impact Crater is about 3 miles (5 kilometers) across. This huge hole was likely created by a meteorite up to 660 feet (200 meters) wide, or longer than the length of two American football fields, according to Resourc.ly, a Western Australia news outlet.

When geologists at Evolution Mining, an Australian gold mining company, came across some unusual rock cores at Ora Banda, they called Jayson Meyers, the principal geophysicist, director and founder of Resource Potentials, a geophysics consulting and contracting company in Perth. Meyers examined the geologists’ drill core samples, as well as rock samples from the site, and he immediately noticed the shatter cones — telltale signs of a

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