Are Deepfakes Dangerous? Creators and Regulators Disagree

Over the past few years, deepfakes have emerged as the internet’s latest go-to for memes and parody content.

It’s easy to see why: They enable creators to bend the rules of reality like no other technology before. Through the magic of deepfakes, you can watch Jennifer Lawrence deliver a speech through the face of Steve Buscemi, see what Ryan Reynolds would’ve looked like as Willy Wonka, and even catch Hitler and Stalin singing Video Killed The Radio Star in a duet.

For the uninitiated, deepfake tech is a form of synthetic media that allows users to superimpose a different face on someone else’s in a way that’s nearly indistinguishable from the original. It does so by reading heaps of data to understand the face’s contours and other characteristics to naturally blend and animate it into the scene.

Ryan Reynolds as Willy Wonka Deepfake from NextFace
NextFace/Youtube

At this point, you’ve probably come across such clips on platforms like

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Fstoppers Reviews the Zhiyun Smooth-XS, a Smartphone Gimbal for Mobile Content Creators

Zhiyun has released another accessory, the Smooth-XS smartphone gimbal, for those who regularly use mobile content in their business or for leisure. How does it compare?

Gimbals are increasingly becoming a natural choice of kit investment not just for professionals creating commercial content with camera bodies but also for those who want to create more polished mobile content for social media, either to supplement an existing business with quick but sleek-looking content or for personal leisure, such as family or travel memories.

This is where smartphone gimbals come into play, and I got to review the Zhiyun Smooth-XS, which is aimed at users looking to create content on the go.

About

Smooth-XS is a compact and lightweight smartphone gimbal that comes in four different colors. Coated with anti-slip rubber, the grip is comfortable to hold. It measures 69 mm in length, 56 mm in width, and 267 mm in height.

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Creators of gene ‘scissors’ clinch Nobel as women sweep chemistry

STOCKHOLM/BERLIN (Reuters) – Two women scientists won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for creating genetic ‘scissors’ that can rewrite the code of life, contributing to new cancer therapies and holding out the prospect of curing hereditary diseases.

FILE PHOTO: French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and professor Jennifer Doudna of the U.S. pose for the media during a visit to a painting exhibition by children about the genome, at the San Francisco park in Oviedo, SPAIN, October 21, 2015. REUTERS/Eloy Alonso

Emmanuelle Charpentier, who is French, and American Jennifer Doudna share the 10 million Swedish crown ($1.1 million) prize for developing the CRISPR/Cas9 tool to edit the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with precision.

“The ability to cut the DNA where you want has revolutionized the life sciences,” Pernilla Wittung Stafshede of the Swedish Academy of Sciences told an award ceremony.

Charpentier,

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TikTok: Video app asks creators about biggest weaknesses

  • A TikTok survey shown to creators in the app indicates where the company thinks its biggest weaknesses might be.
  • In the survey issued late September, TikTok wanted to know if creators felt they were getting enough views, if they were paid enough, and if they had enough face time with local representatives.
  • It makes sense that TikTok wants to keep its creators happy as competition grows.
  • TikTok faces a squeeze for talent from rival services by YouTube, Instagram, and third parties like Triller.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

You can get a sense of the biggest issues an organization thinks it has by the questions it asks of its users.

Companies often conduct surveys of customers to identify issues — and TikTok is no different.

The social media platform quizzed a select group of its users in late September, and alongside the usual questions about their satisfaction with

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Smule Integrates with the Snap Camera to Empower Music Creators with AR Lenses

Smule’s AutoRap goes live with Lenses, powered by the Snap Camera, bringing Snap’s AR innovations to Smule’s music-first community

​Smule​ Inc., the global leader in interactive music creation, today ​announced its integration with Snap to bring imaging and augmented reality (AR) capabilities directly into the Smule app ecosystem, starting with hip-hop music app AutoRap. Smule has integrated Lenses, powered by Snap Camera Kit,​ showcasing the potential of AR to create even more engaging musical performances through dynamic visual elements.

Smule and Snap are bringing together the best of social music and digital imaging to offer both user bases even more immersive experiences. AutoRap, Smule’s recently revamped app for hip-hop enthusiasts, rappers and beat makers, is a fitting launch pad for the new Lenses, considering the significant role that creativity and individualism play in the genre.

See Lenses in action in AutoRap here.

“Hip hop artists have long been pushing the

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TikTok creators fail to block US government’s impending app ban

A judge has denied an attempt by content creators on TikTok to stop a ban of the app in the United States on Sunday, rejecting arguments the ban would cause “immediate, irreparable harm” if it is implemented as scheduled.

The trio of TikTok users, listed as Douglas Marland, Cosette Rinab, and Alex Chambers, attempted to convince the US District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania to issue a temporary restraining order. If granted, the order would have helped prevent the US government from proceeding to ban TikTok from the App Store and Google Play on Sunday.

In the court opinion, published on Sunday, the trio claimed they earned their living from TikTok, with each having a sizable audience of between 1.8 million and 2.7 million subscribers.

The group argues TikTok’s “For You” page is unique, as its algorithm enables “little-known creators” to be discovered by a wider

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TikTok Creators Fail to Stop Pending Ban in U.S. App Stores

A judge denied an attempt by a group of TikTok creators to temporarily block the pending ban of the video-sharing app on U.S. app stores, which is set to happen within the day.

Douglas Marland, Cosette Rinab, and Alec Chambers said in a temporary restraining order request to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania that they earn their living from TikTok, The Verge reported. Marland has 2.7 million subscribers, Rinab has 2.3 million subscribers, and Chambers has 1.8 million subscribers.

The three TikTok creators claimed that they will “lose access to tens of thousands of potential viewers and creators every month, an effect amplified by the looming threat to close TikTok altogether.”

Judge Wendy Beetlestone admitted that TikTok’s ban from U.S. app stores will be an “inconvenience” to the group. However, they were not able to prove that the ban will cause “immediate, irreparable harm” as

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Judge rejects TikTok creators’ request to delay ban, says they won’t suffer ‘irreparable harm’

A judge in Pennsylvania has rejected a request from three TikTok content creators to temporarily block a ban on the app set to go into effect Sunday night, which would bar new downloads from Google and Apple’s app stores in the US.

Douglas Marland, Cosette Rinab, and Alec Chambers said they “earn a livelihood from the content they post on TikTok,” saying the platform’s “For You” page is unique among social media platforms, because its algorithm allows “little-known creators to show their content to a large audience,” according to the court filing.

Marland has 2.7 million TikTok subscribers, Rinab has 2.3 million, and Chambers has 1.8 million. The three argued that they would “lose access to tens of thousands of potential viewers and creators every month, an effect amplified by the looming threat to close TikTok altogether.”

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Apple Temporarily Waives 30% Fee for Facebook Paid Live Events, but Not for Gaming Creators

In an unusual move, Apple has agreed to not collect the App Store’s 30% “tax” on purchases made through Facebook’s app for live paid events — but only through the end of 2020. Moreover, Apple will still take a 30% cut of paid livestreams from video-game  creators using the paid-livestream feature.

The ongoing clash of tech titans is the latest in the public fight some app developers are waging against Apple over its App Store business practices, which they say are unfair.

Facebook complained that Apple agreed only to a short moratorium on collecting in-app fees for paid live events, which it launched last month. For its part, Facebook says it won’t take a cut of creators or businesses’ revenue for livestreaming events until at least August 2021, citing economic hardships inflicted by the COVD pandemic.

“Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will

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‘The Mandalorian’ Creators Talk Sustainable Virtual Production

During the final episode of Variety‘s Sustainability in Hollywood event presented by Toyota Mirai, Rob Bredow, senior vice president and chief creative officer at Industrial Light & Magic, and Janet Lewin, senior vice president and general manager at ILM and co-producer of “The Mandalorian,” talked to artisans editor Jazz Tangcay about how the virtual production of “The Mandalorian” has allowed the show to reduce its carbon footprint.

When Bredow and Lewin were first approached to sign on to “The Mandalorian,” producer Jon Favreau had just wrapped two virtual production-based films, including “The Lion King.” And with his upcoming project, Favreau and the team hoped to use virtual reality tools to create an authentic story from the “Star Wars” universe.

Lewin said the key to creating a live-action film through virtual production is “moving post-production to pre-production,” which means creating and editing the backdrops prior to the shooting.

“You can

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