The COVID-19 Crisis Presents An Opportunity For Companies To Step Up Their Efforts In Ensuring The Safety and Well-Being Of Their Employees


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It is no surprise that the COVID-19 crisis has gravely affected the mental health and well-being of employees. Business priorities and goals all over the world have drastically changed, with key challenges being to keep the business afloat, as well as manage the safety and security of employees.

The social distancing measures implemented by governments within the Middle East region have made people more isolated and uncertain. Homes have turned into offices, playgrounds, gyms, and schools, and changes due to health threats and job losses are not helping to make the situation better. Moreover, in the fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry, our frontliners had to leave the safety of their homes, and make sure that the food is produced and displayed on the shelves of

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COVID-19 Impact Reveals Global Leadership Crisis, According to New Global Survey

The Milken Institute and The Harris Poll today released the findings of a joint research program called “The Listening Project,” finding a global void in leadership as the COVID-19 pandemic has killed more than one million people worldwide and has crippled international economies.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201011005060/en/

Source: Milken Institute and The Harris Poll, “The Listening Project”

The global survey, which was conducted in two phases (before and during COVID-19*) among nearly 30,000 people across 27 countries, found “access and affordability to healthcare” and “communicable/infectious disease containment and prevention” tied as the top two priorities on the list. “Corruption and transparency” rose to the third most urgent problem, as citizens became frustrated with government’s handling of COVID-19 around the globe.

“The Listening Project” demonstrates the widespread lack of support for how countries have handled COVID-19. For example:

  • Globally, 71% of respondents said “this

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Building Resilience During Times of Crisis: What to Expect from CDW’s Tech Talk

In this year like no other, businesses around the world have come to look differently at the nature of risk.

The pandemic has required organizations to think in new ways about cybersecurity, for example. Those operating within a traditional perimeter-based security model have been vexed by remote work environments, where the perimeter has been replaced by every employee’s home.

The VPNs that enable employees to securely access corporate networks have been stretched to their limits, creating some painful work-from-home arrangements. And those employees working remotely have been subject to a range of new security risks, from additional phishing attempts to unsecured home Wi-Fi.

If anything has become clear over the past few months, it is that every organization is subject to unforeseen forces that threaten to derail hard work and the best of intentions. The businesses that have fared the best this year are those that were prepared for anything.

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Brazilian Women Innovate More Than Men Through Covid-19 Crisis

Female entrepreneurs in Brazil have been more agile and effective when implementing technology-based innovation and finding digital alternatives to keep their businesses afloat in by the Covid-19 pandemic than their male counterparts, according to research.

The seventh study on how small companies are faring in the crisis carried out by Brazilian business school Fundação Getúlio Vargas (FGV) and the Brazilian Service of Support for Micro and Small Enterprises (SEBRAE) with 7.586 businesses between August 27-31 across Brazil shows that most female business owners (71%) use social networking websites, apps or Internet platforms to sell their products or services, compared with 63% of the male entrepreneurs polled.

The research has shown that most women run their businesses from their homes (35%, compared with 29% of men). It also noted that the general

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Neuromorphic computing could solve the tech industry’s looming crisis

What’s the best computer in the world? The most souped-up, high-end gaming rig? Whatever supercomputer took the number one spot in the TOP500 this year? The kit inside the datacentres that Apple or Microsoft rely on? Nope: it’s the one inside your skull. 

As computers go, brains are way ahead of the competition. They’re small, lightweight, have low energy consumption, and are amazingly adaptable. And they’re also set to be the model for the next wave of advanced computing.

These brain-inspired designs are known collectively as ‘neuromorphic computing’. Even the most advanced computers don’t come close to the human brain — or even most mammal brains — but our grey matter can give engineers and developers a few pointers on how to make computing infrastrastructure more efficient, by mimicking the brain’s own synapses and neurones.

SEE: Building the bionic brain (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

First, the biology. Neurones are nerve cells,

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Queen stresses need for trusted news sources during Covid crisis

The Queen has issued a message of support to the British newspaper industry, praising traditional media outlets.

The monarch said that “having trusted, reliable sources of information, particularly at a time when there are so many sources competing for our attention, is vital”.



Elizabeth II wearing a pink hat: Photograph: John Stillwell/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: John Stillwell/AFP/Getty Images


In a letter to the News Media Association, the industry organisation that represents all major national and local newspaper publishers, the Queen said: “The Covid-19 pandemic has once again demonstrated what an important public service the established news media provides, both nationally and regionally.

“The efforts of the news media to support communities throughout the United Kingdom during the pandemic have been invaluable – whether through fundraising, encouraging volunteering, or providing a lifeline for the elderly and vulnerable to the outside world.”

The statement was issued to coincide with the launch of the News Media Association’s Journalism Matters

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How the Coinbase memo exemplifies Silicon Valley’s current political crisis

Coinbase, the bitcoin bank valued at $8 billion and expected to go public in 2021, is going through an internal identity crisis.

It started back in June, amid the nationwide protests over the death of George Floyd, when Brian Armstrong, the company’s extremely introverted cofounder and CEO, was asked a question at an employee town hall about why Coinbase had not shown public support for the Black Lives Matter movement. Armstrong declined to give a clear answer, according to crypto news site The Block, and his avoidance resulted in a virtual walkout by “hundreds” of Coinbase’s 1,100 employees on June 3.

The next day, Armstrong tweeted, “I want to unequivocally say that Black Lives Matter.” He added: “I’ve been watching the events of the last few weeks unfold – I really did not know what to say about it for a long time, and I’m still not sure I

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The tech crisis that isn’t: China controls the world’s rare earth supply chains

senkaku-islands-by-al-jazeera-english-1.jpg

Photo of a Japanese Coast Guard vessel patrolling Uotsuri Island by Al Jazeera English, licensed under Creative Commons 2.0.

They’re called either the Diaoyu Archipelago or the Senkaku Islands — eight rocks just a few miles wide, if that, situated about 125 miles southwest of Okinawa. They’re uninhabited, and generally so strategically unimportant that during negotiations for the Treaty of San Francisco in 1951 that established Japan’s territorial borders, diplomats forgot to mention them. They remained “occupied” by the US until 1972. Today, Japan claims them, but so does China and so does Taiwan. From a distance, they look like the tops of old furniture floating just above the waterline after a flood.

Submerged reefs make for wonderful fishing. During the first week of September 2010, several unlicensed Chinese trawlers were spotted operating in what Japan calls the Senkaku. Depending on who tells the story, there may have been as

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Funding crisis threatens zoos’ vital conservation work

Zoos’ vital conservation work is being put at risk by a Covid-related funding crisis.

Breeding programmes to rescue rare species may have to be cancelled, with many zoos facing the biggest cash crisis in their history.

The body that represents British zoos says a government rescue package is inaccessible for most of its members.

Only one zoo has claimed successfully, the BBC has learned.

Zoos face huge income losses due to lockdown and reduced visitor numbers. Ultimately, this will impact on their ability to care for species which are the last of their kind on Earth, and now found only in zoos.

“The extinct-in-the-wild species are absolutely dependent on human care,” said Dr John Ewen of the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

“It’s our decision about which way to go forward that determines extinction or recovery.”

The scimitar-horned oryx is regarded as a conservation success story
The scimitar-horned oryx is regarded as a conservation success story

BBC News has discovered

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Biodiversity: Why the nature crisis matters, in five graphics

Butterfly exhibition, LondonImage copyright
Getty Images

Human activities are destroying the natural world, leading to the extinction of animal and plant species at an alarming rate. Now, world leaders are promising action to tackle the problem. But will it be enough?

What is biodiversity and why does it matter?

Biodiversity is the variety of all living things on Earth, and how they fit together in the web of life, bringing oxygen, water, food and countless other benefits.

Recent reports and studies have produced alarming news about the state of nature.

Last year, an intergovernmental panel of scientists said one million animal and plant species were now threatened with extinction.

And this month, a report found global populations of mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles plunged by 68%, on average, between 1970 and 2016.

Are we living in an age of extinction?

Scientists have warned that we are entering the sixth mass extinction,

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