Apple bundles free three-month Apple Arcade trial with new device purchases

Anyone who buys a new iPhone, iPad, Mac, iPod touch, or Apple TV after October 22nd gets free three-month trial of Apple Arcade, Apple has announced. Apple’s games subscription service normally costs $4.99 a month, and gives you access to over 100 downloadable games with no ads or in-game purchases.



a hand holding a cell phone


© Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge


Apple has long used lengthy free trial periods to advertise its subscription services. When it launched Apple TV Plus last year it gave customers a whole year of the service for free with the purchase of an eligible device, and recently extended these trials by up to three months. Three months is also the standard trial period for Apple Music. Until now, however, Apple has only offered a one month free trial of Apple Arcade with new sign-ups.

Loading...

Load Error

Apple Arcade normally costs $4.99 a month

The company’s year-long Apple

Read More

iPhone 12 and 5G: What today’s event means for your next Apple device

gettyimages-1131489187

Apple is set to introduce its first 5G phones in October. Don’t worry, there won’t be huge bezels on the sides of the screen like this older iPhone.


Getty Images

This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple headquarters.

Apple’s latest tease: “Hi, Speed.” 5G speed, that is. The company is gearing up to introduce its iPhone 12 lineup on Tuesday, and the biggest new feature is likely to be something commonly found in Android smartphones; next-generation 5G cellular connectivity

The new version of wireless networks started rolling out across the globe last year and picked up speed in 2020. Virtually all new Android phones arriving in the US today offer 5G, and the country’s biggest carriers have been talking nonstop about the connectivity. Now that Apple is jumping into the fray with its 5G-enabled iPhone 12 models, the

Read More

Foldax Named Cardiovascular Device Company of the Year by MedTech Outlook

Foldax® announced today that it has been selected as Company of the Year among 10 cardiovascular device company finalists by MedTech Outlook Magazine. Foldax was honored for its innovative Tria™ heart valve, the first biopolymer heart valve to receive FDA approval for a U.S. clinical trial.

Foldax has reinvented every aspect of the artificial heart valve – from material to design to manufacturing – to develop surgical and transcatheter valves designed to last a lifetime that address historical tradeoffs. The Tria heart valve is made with its proprietary LifePolymer™ biopolymer that, combined with an innovative valve design, is intended to eliminate calcification, withstand stresses and strains in the heart without failure, and restore patient quality of life without lifelong anticoagulant use.

Tria is also the first and only heart valve to be robotically manufactured, reducing variability and enabling high precision, repeatability and quality, while substantially improving the economics of heart

Read More

How An Adobe Employee Made Every Device In The World More Queer (With Just Emojis)

One Adobe employee, with an expertise in fonts, is behind the victory of making perhaps the most universal language in the world–emojis–more gender-inclusive.

Paul D. Hunt is the designer and creator behind the latest gender-inclusive emojis, that are now on nearly every device all over the world.

They are part of the newest set of emojis ‘Unicode 13’ a set of standards released earlier this year by the Unicode Consortium, an organization that sets rules for tech companies using special characters like emoji. 

Hunt is a typeface designer and font developer at Adobe. Still, motivated by personal reasons to make all emoji, more gender-inclusive, they submitted plans to the Unicode Consortium.

“I decided to champion the case for gender-inclusive emoji because, as a queer

Read More

Security firm: WarezTheRemote flaw could turn a Comcast remote into a listening device

Could your cable TV device spy on you? Vulnerability found and patched in Comcast TV remote.

guardiacore.jpg

Security researchers at Guardicore reverse-engineered the firmware update process for a popular Comcast remote to turn the device into a spying tool.

Image: Guardicore

Security firm Guardicore reverse-engineered the firmware update process for Comcast’s XR11 remote to take control of the device. Researchers interrupted the process to turn the voice-control element of the remote into a listening device.

Once the malicious firmware update was in place, researchers used a 16dBi antenna and were able to listen to conversations inside a house from about 65 feet away.

The WarezTheRemote attack could have affected the 18 million remotes in use around the US. After Guardicore disclosed the vulnerability to Comcast, the company developed a fix that was deployed to all units by the end of September. 

SEE: Social engineering: A cheat sheet for business professionals (free

Read More

Google Chromecast Review: A Streaming Device That Gets Better the More It Knows

All told, I was disappointed. Given how much Google knows about me, I was hoping it would do a better job at predicting what I would like to see. In the top row, labeled “Top picks for you,” Google recommended that I watch “The Wendy Williams Show,” a celebrity talk show, as well as “SportsCenter.” (For the record, both my wife and I don’t watch talk shows, and we’re not sports fans.)

It also recommended I check out “Wonder Park” and “Bigfoot Junior,” both children’s animated movies. (We don’t have children.)

A few of Google’s recommendations were spot on. “Snowpiercer,” a movie from my favorite Korean director, was a top pick. One row of recommendations was devoted to home improvement shows, which makes sense because I’ve been watching dozens of do-it-yourself repair videos to work on my house amid pandemic-induced boredom. Another row presented cooking videos from YouTubers I frequently

Read More

‘Smart’ Male Chastity Device Vulnerable To Locking By Hackers: Researchers

A security flaw in an internet-connected male chastity device could allow hackers to remotely lock it — leaving users trapped, researchers have warned.

The Cellmate, produced by Chinese firm Qiui, is a cover that clamps on the base of the male genitals with a hardened steel ring, and does not have a physical key or manual override.

The locking mechanism is controlled with a smartphone app via Bluetooth — marketed as both an anti-cheating and a submission sex play device — but security researchers have found multiple flaws that leave it vulnerable to hacking.

“We discovered that remote attackers could prevent the Bluetooth lock from being opened, permanently locking the user in the device. There is no physical unlock,” British security firm Pen Test Partners said Tuesday.

“An angle grinder or other suitable heavy tool would be required to cut the wearer free.”

The firm also found other security flaws

Read More

Nest Audio is Google’s new Home speaker. 7 things to know about the upcoming device

Google’s new smart speaker for your home takes on a completely new design — and a new name. From the specs to the look, Nest Audio is very much the next-generation full-size smart speaker for everyday use.



The new Nest Audio replaces the original Google Home speaker. Google/Screenshot by CNET


© Provided by CNET
The new Nest Audio replaces the original Google Home speaker. Google/Screenshot by CNET

There’s plenty we know about the fabric-coated device, and much we’ll still have to find out. For example, we know it promises to improve speaker volume by an astonishing percentage, but we’ll have to see how the Nest Audio stacks up tothe recently updated Amazon Echo in real-world tests. If the Nest Audio’s specs are any indication, this could be the Alexa-killer Google has been hoping for.



The new Nest Audio replaces the original Google Home speaker.


© screenshot/Google

The new Nest Audio replaces the original Google Home speaker.



See it at Best Buy

We’ll walk you through the most important things to learn about the

Read More

Researchers’ device tracks biomarkers in sweat, may indicate flare-ups — ScienceDaily

University of Texas at Dallas researchers have designed a wearable device that monitors sweat for biomarkers that could signal flare-ups of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

A team of bioengineers demonstrated the wristwatch-like device in a proof-of-concept study funded by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation and published online July 28 and in the October print edition of the foundation’s journal, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

A sensor in the device detects and quantifies the presence of two key biomarkers associated with inflammatory bowel disease: interleukin-1β and C-reactive protein (CRP). The study is the first to establish that CRP is present in human sweat and the first to show that the two biomarkers can be detected in sweat.

Dr. Shalini Prasad, department head and professor of bioengineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science and the study’s principal investigator, said the technology could provide a warning but not a diagnosis

Read More

Google launches new phones, streaming device, speaker at event (NASDAQ:GOOG)

Updated 2:32 p.m., last update: And that’s a (rapid) wrap. (The COVID-19 world of pretaping events allows for some tight editing.) As mentioned at the beginning, so many details of the hardware had been exposed in previous weeks that the key information was the $699 price point and Oct. 15 availability for the Pixel 5.

Updated 2:24 p.m.: Moving rapidly, Google says the Pixel 5 is base priced at $699. As widely expected, that’s backing off a bit from the $1,000 mark, but still offering 5G capability; it’s promising “no compromise” to bring 5G into an affordable phone. It’s available Oct. 15. As expected, the Pixel 4a 5G is priced at $499.

Updated 2:14 p.m.: The former Google Home smart speaker has become “Nest Audio” (accompanied by the puck-sized Nest Audio Mini). For $99, Nest Audio promises “rich bass, more volume, and fuller, clearer sound” (50% more bass than before,

Read More