IGT’s Resort Wallet Technology Leads Evolution of Cashless Gaming in New York State

LONDON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — International Game Technology PLC (“IGT”) (NYSE: IGT) announced today that the Company is leading the evolution of casino operations with its Resort Wallet™ cashless solution at the newly reopened Resorts World Catskills Casino and Resort (“Resorts World Catskills”) in Monticello, N.Y., a subsidiary of the Genting Group. Resort Wallet gives Resorts World Catskills patrons the option of a contactless, safe, and effortless cashless gaming experience. Players can use their physical Resorts World Catskills Players Club card to load cash into a secure digital wallet from either the casino cashier or any slot machine, and access those funds from any slot machine.

“Today’s casino guests are seeking a unique combination of gaming excitement, luxury, convenience, and safety. IGT’s Resort Wallet solution will help to ensure that Resorts World Catskills delivers every aspect of its brand promise,” said Bob DeSalvio, President of Genting Americas East. “IGT’s

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A Brief History And The Evolution Of Partnerships

David Yovanno is the CEO of Impact, a technology company helping enterprises grow through partnerships.

The concept of partnerships has been around for some time. It extends from the recent definition of traditional affiliates and social media influencers, and even further back from the Industrial Revolution and big business in the 1800s. The original partnerships — two people or groups working together for mutual benefit — have probably been around since the dawn of civilization. We have long known the inherent benefit of working together. 

But today’s modern partnerships offer unique opportunities for business growth that didn’t exist even 20 years ago. So where did modern partnerships come from, where are we today and what’s next? Let’s explore.

The Inception: Affiliates 

Picture this: It is the late 20th century, the World Wide Web has emerged as a staple in the everyday consumer’s lifestyle. With this new platform, all

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Prominent Stages In The Evolution Of Ransomware

At its rudimentary stage, online extortion was all about bluff and did not use cryptography at all. It hinged upon screen lockers stating that the FBI caught users violating copyright or distributing NSFW content. Victims were instructed to pay a fine via a prepaid service such as MoneyPak or Ukash.

Things have changed dramatically over time. Ransomware operators rethought the range of their intended victims, switching to the enterprise as juicier prey than individuals. In recent years, they also added a data leak strategy and DDoS threats to their genre. As a result, online extortion has matured into one of today’s most detrimental cybersecurity perils.

Ransomware went pro in 2013

The first mainstream file-encrypting ransom Trojan called CryptoLocker made its debut in September 2013. It used an asymmetric 2048-bit RSA cipher

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Vivo’s detachable pop-up camera concept is the evolution smartphone photography needs!

Vivo is not new to innovation in mobile camera technology. After having surprised the industry with the pop-up selfie camera, and a phone with dual elevating front cameras; the Chinese OEM has gone a step further to introduce a concept phone with a pop-up selfie camera module that can be removed from the body of the smartphone. This conceptual, interactive, and intuitive camera opens up a whole new range of multi-angle photography previously unseen with smartphone cameras.

IFEA Camera Mobilephone, as Vivo calls its concept smartphone, comes with a detachable front camera module called the IFEA. A user can detach the rectangular camera from the phone once it has completely popped out of its housing. IFEA can then be used wirelessly in any setting while being controlled with the smartphone from a distance. Vivo says the camera can also be voice-controlled to click and record. Furthermore, it can be attached

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Zoologists uncover new example of rapid evolution — meet the Sulawesi Babblers — ScienceDaily

Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working in tropical Southeast Asia, have uncovered a modern-day example of rapid evolution in action.

The zoologists have discovered that male and female Sulawesi Babblers (Pellorneum celebense, a species of bird) have evolved to attain different sizes on small islands, and in quick-fire time. They believe this is most likely due to evolutionary pressure favouring such “dimorphism” because the birds are able to reduce competition with each other by feeding on different, scarce resources.

The research, completed with the support of the Irish Research Council and collaborators in Universitas Halu Oleo, is published today in the journal Biotropica. The research shows that the males of the Sulawesi Babbler grow to be up to 15% larger than the females — with this difference particularly marked on the smaller islands.

Fionn Ó Marcaigh, first author on the paper and a PhD Candidate in Trinity’s

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New study rebuts 75-year-old belief in reptile evolution — ScienceDaily

Challenging a 75-year-old notion about how and when reptiles evolved during the past 300 million-plus years involves a lot of camerawork, loads of CT scanning, and, most of all, thousands of miles of travel. Just check the stamps in Tiago R. Simões ‘ passport.

Simões is the Alexander Agassiz Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Harvard paleontologist Stephanie Pierce. From 2013 to 2018, he traveled to more than 20 countries and more than 50 different museums to take CT scans and photos of nearly 1,000 reptilian fossils, some hundreds of millions of years old. It amounted to about 400 days of active collection, helping form what is believed to be the largest available timeline on the evolution of major living and extinct reptile groups.

Now, a statistical analysis of that vast database is helping scientists better understand the evolution of these cold-blooded vertebrates by contradicting a widely held theory that

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Researchers reconstruct the ancestral great ape Y and show its rapid evolution in bonobo and chimpanzee — ScienceDaily

New analysis of the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosomes from all living species of the great ape family helps to clarify our understanding of how this enigmatic chromosome evolved. A clearer picture of the evolution of the Y chromosome is important for studying male fertility in humans as well as our understanding of reproduction patterns and the ability to track male lineages in the great apes, which can help with conservation efforts for these endangered species.

A team of biologists and computer scientists at Penn State sequenced and assembled the Y chromosome from orangutan and bonobo and compared those sequences to the existing human, chimpanzee, and gorilla Y sequences. From the comparison, the team were able to clarify patterns of evolution that seem to fit with behavioral differences between the species and reconstruct a model of what the Y chromosome might have looked like in the ancestor of

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Recent findings suggest the repeated evolution of similar traits in island lizards was not channelled by developmental responses to the environment, as commonly thought — ScienceDaily

Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards, in a study published recently in eLife.

The findings in Greater Antillean Anolis lizards provide insights on why creatures often evolve similar physical features independently when living in similar habitats. They suggest that the role of developmental plasticity in shaping adaptive evolution may be less important than commonly thought.

Developmental plasticity refers to how development responds to the environment, in particular the way that an organism’s genetic constitution (or genotype) interacts with its environment during development to produce a particular set of characteristics (or phenotype).

“Anolis lizards that live on all four of the Greater Antillean islands have independently and repeatedly evolved six different body types for maneuvering through their given habitat,” says lead author Nathalie Feiner, Researcher at the Department of Biology, Lund University, Sweden. “As a result, they make a great model

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Genomes of two millipede species shed light on their evolution, development and physiology — ScienceDaily

Millipedes, those many-legged denizens of the soil surface throughout the world, don’t always get the recognition they deserve. But a new study by Jerome Hui of Chinese University of Hong Kong and colleagues puts them in the spotlight, sequencing and analyzing complete genomes from two very different millipede species. The study, publishing on September 29th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, provides important insights into arthropod evolution, and highlights the genetic underpinnings of unique features of millipede physiology.

Millipedes and centipedes together comprise the Myriapoda — arthropods with multi-segmented trunks and many legs. Centipedes sport one pair of legs per segment, while millipedes bear two. Despite the apparent numeric implications of their names, different centipede species bear between 30 and 354 legs, and millipedes between 22 and 750. There are about 16,000 species of myriapods, including over 12,000 species of millipedes, but only two myriapod genomes have so far

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Study traces the evolution of gill covers

USC-led study traces the evolution of gill covers
A little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) embryo showing Pou3f3 gene activity in the central nervous system as well as the five pairs of nascent gill covers. Credit: Christine Hirschberger, University of Cambridge

The emergence of jaws in primitive fish allowed vertebrates to become top predators. What is less appreciated is another evolutionary innovation that may have been just as important for the success of early vertebrates: the formation of covers to protect and pump water over the gills. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), USC Stem Cell scientists and their collaborators have identified a key modification to the genome that led to the evolution of gill covers more than 430 million years ago.


The scientists started by creating zebrafish with mutations in a gene called Pou3f3. Strikingly, fish lacking this gene, or the DNA element controlling its activity in the

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