Technology Standards, ‘Tech Debt’ Among Issues Media Will Face After An Unusual 2020

Technology development has sped up, rather than slowed down, during 2020, as the global coronavirus pandemic has led companies to quickly implement workflows they might have only imagined before having to deploy widespread remote operations.

At the same time, the scramble to move operations off-premises has pushed technologists to focus on next steps, including the need for standards that will apply across media supply chains and to govern media’s use of artificial intelligence among other things.

That, in a nutshell, captures a conversation among four technology leaders and a pair of rising stars that is set to take place Monday, Oct. 19, at 4 p.m. ET.

All six of the technologists participating in the “Predictions for 2021,” will have just received TVNewsCheck’s 2020 Women in Technology Awards in a presentation ceremony webcast live by TVNewsCheck.

Among their predictions:

  • Media companies that have scrambled to implement solutions to support
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American Pikas show resiliency in the face of global warming — ScienceDaily

The American pika is a charismatic, diminutive relative of rabbits that some researchers say is at high risk of extinction due to climate change. Pikas typically live in cool habitats, often in mountains, under rocks and boulders. Because pikas are sensitive to high temperatures, some researchers predict that, as the Earth’s temperature rises, pikas will have to move ever higher elevations until they eventually run out of habitat and die out. Some scientists have claimed this cute little herbivore is the proverbial canary in the coal mine for climate change.

A new extensive review by Arizona State University emeritus professor Andrew Smith, published in the October issue of the Journal of Mammalogy, finds that the American pika is far more resilient in the face of warm temperatures than previously believed. While emphasizing that climate change is a serious threat to the survival of many species on Earth, Smith believes

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1,000 Dreams Fund and HARMAN Unite to Award ‘New Face of Tech’ Scholarships

The goal of the scholarship program is to foster the passions of the next generation of female tech leaders by opening doors to their future career goals and aspirations. This year, 40 aspiring changemakers in tech will be selected to receive a $1,500 grant each and a JBL product, obtain career coaching from a HARMAN executive, build resume skills, and have an opportunity to interview for an employment opportunity at HARMAN, a global leader in consumer electronics and connected technologies for the home, office, and car.

In light of the unprecedented challenges many college women are facing due to COVID-19, HARMAN has expanded its commitment to 1,000 Dreams Fund to help even more young women fund their dreams. The two organizations make a powerful team, and since the program’s launch in 2017, over $50,000 has been granted to inspiring young women in tech throughout the country. Additionally, 1DF is a

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Apple on EU ‘hit list’ of big tech companies that will face stricter rules

The European Union plans to impose new and stricter regulations on a “hit list” of 20 large internet companies — including Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Apple.

EU regulators, who are seeking new powers to police Big Tech in Europe, are currently drawing up that “hit list.” The companies will be subject to more stringent rules in an effort to curb their market power.

The list of rules will be based on criteria such as the number of users a company has, or the market share of revenues, according to The Financial Times. It could also include technology companies deemed so powerful that rivals can’t trade without using their platforms.

Companies that find themselves on the list may face new rules that could force them to be more transparent about the information they gather and regulations requiring them to share data with their competitors. It’s likely that the list will

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SAP users face cost squeeze, pressure to digitalise: survey

By Douglas Busvine

BERLIN (Reuters) – The customers of software group SAP <SAPG.DE> are suffering severe declines in revenue and earnings while at the same time facing intensifying pressure to hike IT spending to go digital, a survey showed on Monday.

The poll of SAP’s German-speaking user community found that nearly three-quarters were experiencing sharp drops in revenue. At the same time, over four-fifths said the coronavirus pandemic made digital transformation a more pressing task.

“At the centre of this crisis is the need for businesses to do more with less,” said Marco Lenck, chairman of the German-speaking DSAG user group that commissioned the survey.

The DSAG, which represents 3,700 businesses, is an influential lobby that has called on SAP to make it easier to upgrade systems traditionally hosted on site to run in remote datacentres.

Such cloud hosting makes it easier for firms to scale up or pare back

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Face ID in ‘iPhone 12’ may gain speed alongside camera enhancements

The “iPhone 12” could include a faster Face ID authentication than currently offered, a leaker claims, as well as an enhanced version of digital zoom that is assisted by advancements in computational photography.

In the days before Apple is anticipated to launch a new collection of iPhones, more leaks about what to expect are surfacing by various sources. One such leak from a well-established leaker centers around the photographic capabilities of the inbound models.

According to a series of tweets from “@Pineeaks,” a Twitter account operated by Max Winebach, Apple is still planning to ship a “dynamic zoning algorithm” for the TrueDepth camera array. The algorithm would enable the Face ID biometric authentication system to acquire a user’s face at a faster rate, which will shave off fractions of a second from the entire Face ID unlocking process.

The tweet list, spotted by MacRumors also claims Apple

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Remembering Mario Molina, Nobel Prize-winning chemist who pushed Mexico on clean energy — and, recently, face masks

<span class="caption">Molina speaking about climate change at the Guadalajara International Book Fair in Mexico, Nov. 2018. </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/nobel-prize-recipient-mario-molina-speaks-to-the-audience-news-photo/1074094970?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Leonardo Alvarez/Getty Images">Leonardo Alvarez/Getty Images</a></span>
Molina speaking about climate change at the Guadalajara International Book Fair in Mexico, Nov. 2018. Leonardo Alvarez/Getty Images

Dr. Mario Molina, the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who died on Oct. 7 at age 77, did not become a scientist to change the world; he just loved chemistry. Born in Mexico City in 1943, Molina as a young boy conducted home experiments with contaminated water just for the fun of it.

But Molina came to understand the political importance of his work on atmospheric chemistry and ozone layer depletion, which won him the Nobel in 1995, along with Paul J. Crutzen and F. Sherwood Rowland. Getting that surprise call from Sweden completely changed how he saw his role in the world, Molina said in 2016. He felt a responsibility to share his knowledge of clean energy, air quality and climate change broadly and to push decision-makers to use that information to protect

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Nvidia and Huawei face uncertain future in Britain’s high-tech capital

University of Cambridge

Geography Photos/UIG via Getty Images

LONDON — Situated in the middle of China and the U.S., the English university city of Cambridge has found itself at the center of two massive tech sagas.

U.S. chip maker Nvidia and Chinese hardware manufacturer Huawei have big expansion plans in Cambridge but both companies have big hurdles to overcome if their dreams are to be realized.

Nvidia hopes to acquire Cambridge-headquartered Arm for $40 billion and set up a new “world-class” AI center in the city, while Huawei plans to build a £1 billion ($1.3 billion) research lab in Sawston, located roughly eight miles from Cambridge city center.

Renowned for being one of the world’s greatest intellectual powerhouses, Cambridge is home to thousands of tech workers and companies like Amazon, Microsoft and Apple all employ highly-educated research teams in the city. “Lots of tech companies want to get foothold in

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Uniqlo’s AIRism technology face masks have now launched in the UK

Uniqlo's AIRism technology face masks have now launched in the UK. (Uniqlo)
Uniqlo’s AIRism technology face masks have now launched in the UK. (Uniqlo)

Yahoo Lifestyle is committed to finding you the best products at the best prices. We may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Prices were correct at the time of publication. 

Face masks are now very much a part of everyday life.

Many of us have a variety to choose from – depending on where we’re going and what we’re wearing – some of us have accumulated matching face masks for each new outfit we buy, and some of us are fine with wearing blue disposable versions.

But, the fact still remains the same for all of us, whether you’re keen on splurging or not, face masks are here to stay.

Back in September, Prime Minister Boris Johnson confirmed that he was extending the rules on face coverings in England, making their use mandatory

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How much more abuse do female politicians face? A lot.

On Monday, the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, a London-based think tank that researches extremism, released some timely data showing that some of the same politicians calling out Twitter’s inaction are indeed facing more attacks online than other politicians. 

The study: Researchers collected publicly tagged mentions on Twitter and Facebook for a handful of politicians for two weeks in June and July, scrutinizing them manually and using AI to identify abusive posts. 

Overall, researchers found that women and people of color were “far more likely than men to be abused on Twitter.” They found that women received an average of 12% more abuse on Facebook than male politicians. Between 5% and 10% of mentions of most male politicians were considered abusive, while mentions of female politicians on Twitter contained abuse between 15% and 39% of the time. 

Overall, women were targeted much more personally by the tweets in the study. While

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