Facebook’s Festive Playbook Lays Out Consumer Trends For Businesses To Shine This Diwali

Festive Playbook will help brands build campaigns based on current consumer trends for Diwali and beyond

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Facebook on Wednesday launched Festive Playbook which through video, AR (augmented reality), influencers, vernacular and messaging will drive discovery of brands, shopping and celebrations to help brands connect with shoppers digitally this Diwali.

The Festive Playbook comes on the back of a series of efforts by Facebook to work with the industry, and help the recovery of businesses from the pandemic.

“Diwali and the weeks leading up to it are critical to businesses in India and consequently to the economy. More than half the purchases in key festival spends of fashion and tech devices are now

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Facebook’s China Tactics Backfire – The New York Times

This article is part of the On Tech newsletter. You can sign up here to receive it weekdays.

Instagram’s boss had a message this week for the White House and the world: It was counterproductive for the United States to try to ban TikTok, the popular video app from China.

It’s bad for U.S. tech companies and people in the United States, Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, told Axios, if other countries take similar steps against technology from beyond their borders — including Facebook and its Instagram app. (He and Mark Zuckerberg have said this before, too.) “It’s really going to be problematic if we end up banning TikTok and we set a precedent for more countries to ban more apps,” he said.

Mosseri has a point. What he didn’t say, though, was that Facebook has itself partly to blame. The company helped fan the fears about TikTok

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Facebook’s nudity-spotting AI mistook a photo of some onions for ‘sexually suggestive’ content



a group of oranges in a pile: Getty


© Getty
Getty

  • A Canadian garden center had its Facebook ad for onion seeds taken down by the platform on Monday.
  • Facebook said the ad was removed for breaking its rules on “products with overtly sexual positioning.”
  • Facebook’s head of comms in Canada said the post had been restored on Wednesday, and that it had been initially removed by the platform’s automated moderation systems.
  • “We use automated technology to keep nudity off our apps. But sometimes it doesn’t know a walla walla onion from a, well, you know.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook’s AI struggles to tell the difference between sexual pictures of the human body and globular vegetables.

A garden center in Newfoundland, Canada on Monday received a notice from Facebook about an ad it had uploaded for Walla Walla onion seeds that contained a photo of some onions.

Facebook’s notice said the ad broke its

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Facebook’s alleged indifference of Indian hate speech linked to policy chief’s political bias

Over the past several weeks, there has been an increasing clamour for Facebook to place its India public policy head, Ankhi Das, on leave as the company continues with an audit of its India operations.

The impetus for the audit was an article written by the Wall Street Journal in mid-August. In that piece, WSJ reported that Das had resisted against taking down inflammatory content that eventually sparked rioting in the capital city of Delhi as it was posted by members of the nationalist BJP party. 

The riots left over fifty dead, most of whom were Muslims. It also led to many of these Muslims’ homes being torched.

“The company’s top public-policy executive in the country, Ankhi Das, opposed applying the hate-speech rules to [T Raja] Singh and at least three other Hindu nationalist individuals and groups flagged internally for promoting or participating in violence,” WSJ reported.

These inflammatory posts

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The Technology 202: Facebook’s new ad limits highlight pressure to prepare for chaotic election aftermath

The social network says the move is intended to limit misinformation and abuse of its service, following broad criticism that it has not done enough to stamp out falsehoods on its platform. Facebook hasn’t said how long the ad suspension will last, but in an internal memo to its sales staff that was obtained by the Washington Post, executives told staff to tell advertisers the ban would last a week.

The changes less than a month before Election Day underscore how tech companies are scrambling to address a fast-changing political environment. 

Tech companies have been making key changes to rein in disinformation since Russia used their platforms in 2016 to divide and sow discord among Americans. But critics say many of those steps to limit foreign influence haven’t gone far enough to address disinformation emanating from within the United States – often from the megaphone of the president. 

Social media

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U.S. House Antitrust Chairman Calls Unwinding Facebook’s Instagram Buy ‘The Right Answer’ | Technology News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Representative David Cicilline, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee, said on Wednesday he would be “comfortable with unwinding” Facebook Inc’s acquisition of Instagram.

The antitrust subcommittee on Tuesday released a report on Big Tech’s abuses of market power but stopped short of naming specific companies or acquisitions that must be broken up.

Cicilline, a Democrat from Rhode Island, told Reuters in an interview that Facebook should not have been allowed to buy Instagram, a deal that the Federal Trade Commission approved in 2012.

“I would be comfortable with unwinding that. I think that’s the right answer,” he said.

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment. It has said previously that Instagram was insignificant at the time it was purchased and that Facebook built it into the success it has become.

Any effort to unwind the deal would entail the government

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Facebook’s moves shake up ‘big tech’ payments balance

America’s tech giants Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Apple continue apace their march into payments. With Google Pay, Amazon Pay, Facebook Pay, and Apple Pay, they’ve put their brands foremost and use payments to boost on-platform engagement and commerce, reinforcing their centrality in consumers’ lives.

They’ve taken an incrementalist approach, working with incumbent payment networks, processors, and banks, thus far. However, as their payments’ footprints broaden and deepen, that modus vivendi will be stressed.

In particular, Facebook, the world’s leading social-media network outside China, bears watching. It’s starting to roll out Facebook Pay to two billion WhatsApp users and prepping to launch Libra, which could roil the reigning payments ecosystem.

Libra uses stablecoins backed by fiat currencies. If it gets traction it’ll be disruptive. However, building payment-network critical mass, and therefore value and relevance, is hard. Existing systems work. Consumers and merchants are creatures of habit in payments. The graveyard of

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Facebook’s AI matches people in need with those willing to assist

Facebook says it has deployed a feature in its Community Help hub to make it easier for users to assist each other during the pandemic. As of this week, AI will detect when a public post on News Feed is about needing or offering help and will surface a suggestion to share it on Community Help. Once a post is moved or published directly to the hub, an algorithm will recommend matches between people.

For example, if someone posts an offer to deliver groceries, they’ll see recommendations within Community Help to connect with people who recently posted about needing this type of assistance. Similarly, if someone requests masks, AI will surface suggested neighbors who recently posted an offer to make face coverings.

Building this Community Help feature, which Facebook says is available in all countries in English and 17 other languages, involved a difficult engineering challenge because the system needs

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Facebook’s latest integrations with Instagram could make it harder for regulators to break up the company

Today, let’s talk about a couple little things that could turn into a big thing.

In January 2019, Mike Isaac reported a noteworthy development about Facebook at the New York Times. In the months to come, he said, Facebook would unify the technical infrastructure powering Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp. To the user, these changes would be invisible. But to Facebook itself, there were clear strategic imperatives to merge the apps. Among them: the move came just as the US government was beginning to consider an effort to break the company up.

In the nearly two years since, the government’s effort has accelerated. On September 15th, the Wall Street Journal reported that an antitrust case against the company could come by the end of the year. But Facebook’s effort to puree its family of apps into a single software smoothie on the back end has picked up as well. And

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Facebook’s billions are backing two tech direct listings on Wednesday: Palantir and Asana

  • Palantir and Asana are pursuing direct listings, following the path of Spotify and Slack.
  • Peter Thiel, an early Facebook investor and board member, co-founded Palantir and invested early in Asana.
  • Dustin Moskovitz made billions of dollars as a Facebook co-founder and used some of it to start Asana in 2008.



Peter Thiel wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera


© Provided by CNBC
Peter Thiel

On the last day of the New York Stock Exchange’s

NYSE president Stacey Cunningham: September is on track to be the busiest month for IPOs due to pent-up demand

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

, two tech companies are taking a different approach to going public.

Software makers Palantir and Asana are launching direct listings on Wednesday, allowing existing shareholders to sell stock to new investors rather than raising money through a traditional share sale.

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It’s not the only thing they have in common. Both companies were born in the San Francisco

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