High-speed photos shine a light on how metals fail

High-speed photos shine a light on how metals fail
An alloy sample being stretched in front of the laser-high speed camera set up. Credit: Aalto University

How things deform and break is important for engineers, as it helps them choose and design what materials they’re going to use for building things. Researchers at Aalto University and Tampere University have stretched metal alloy samples to their breaking point and filmed it using ultra-fast cameras to study what happens. Their discoveries have the potential to open up a whole new line of research in the study of materials deformation.


When materials get stretched a bit, they expand, and when the stretching stops, they return to their original size. However, if a material gets stretched a lot, they no longer return back to their original size. This over-stretching is referred to as ‘plastic’ deformation. Materials that have begun to be plastically deformed behave differently when they’re stretched even more, and eventually snap

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Windows 10: This handy new feature will warn if your drive is about to fail

Windows 10 will soon alert users if their SSD is at risk of breaking down, and advise them to backup their data pronto.

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Microsoft wants to make sure you don’t end up looking like this guy.

Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto

We’ve all been in the unfortunate situation of desperately trying to recover important data from a storage drive that’s met an untimely end. Fortunately, Microsoft is now working on a new feature that will help warn users of an impending drive failure before the dreaded event occurs.

The new feature comes packaged as part of the latest
Windows 10

Insider Preview Build 20226, and is designed to detect hardware abnormalities for NVMe SSD and provide a heads-up when it detects a risk of imminent failure. If a problem is detected, Windows will provide a notification recommending that users immediately back up their data – immediately being the key word, here.

SEE: 

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Why No One Understands Agile, SCRUM & DevOps & Why Perfect Technology Abstractions Are Sure To Fail

The problem with Agile, SCRUM and DevOps – and all abstract solutions – is that expectations are always set too high toward unachievable goals.  Requirements management and applications development are just parts of a continuous journey, not the destination, because there is no final destination. Agile is a strategic attitude, not a CPA exam.

It Always Sounds Better Than It Is

Whether it’s Agile, DevOps, SCRUM, enterprise architecture, digital transformation or even cloud computing, we always wax poetic about how they will save a fortune, generate new revenue and, OMG, change everything.  Technologists write business cases, sell them to non-technology executives and then proceed with unjustified optimism.  This time it’s Agile methodology and its cousins SCRUM and DevOps. 

Agile projects fail almost as much as all the others.  Yet we still sell “Agile” as an elixir:  “If we only had an Agile environment, an Agile team

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TikTok creators fail to block US government’s impending app ban

A judge has denied an attempt by content creators on TikTok to stop a ban of the app in the United States on Sunday, rejecting arguments the ban would cause “immediate, irreparable harm” if it is implemented as scheduled.

The trio of TikTok users, listed as Douglas Marland, Cosette Rinab, and Alex Chambers, attempted to convince the US District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania to issue a temporary restraining order. If granted, the order would have helped prevent the US government from proceeding to ban TikTok from the App Store and Google Play on Sunday.

In the court opinion, published on Sunday, the trio claimed they earned their living from TikTok, with each having a sizable audience of between 1.8 million and 2.7 million subscribers.

The group argues TikTok’s “For You” page is unique, as its algorithm enables “little-known creators” to be discovered by a wider

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TikTok Creators Fail to Stop Pending Ban in U.S. App Stores

A judge denied an attempt by a group of TikTok creators to temporarily block the pending ban of the video-sharing app on U.S. app stores, which is set to happen within the day.

Douglas Marland, Cosette Rinab, and Alec Chambers said in a temporary restraining order request to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania that they earn their living from TikTok, The Verge reported. Marland has 2.7 million subscribers, Rinab has 2.3 million subscribers, and Chambers has 1.8 million subscribers.

The three TikTok creators claimed that they will “lose access to tens of thousands of potential viewers and creators every month, an effect amplified by the looming threat to close TikTok altogether.”

Judge Wendy Beetlestone admitted that TikTok’s ban from U.S. app stores will be an “inconvenience” to the group. However, they were not able to prove that the ban will cause “immediate, irreparable harm” as

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Death counts fail to capture full mortality effects of COVID-19, study finds — ScienceDaily

More than 200,000 people in the U.S. have died from COVID-19. Some argue that statistic is inaccurate due to inconsistencies in how deaths are being reported. But researchers from the University of South Florida claim that even if those deaths have been correctly measured, the number doesn’t fully convey the true mortality effects of COVID-19.

A study published in the Journal of Public Health finds that for each person in the U.S. who died after contracting COVID-19, an average of nearly 10 years of life had been lost. Researchers claim “years of life lost” is a more insightful measure than death count since it accounts for the ages of the deceased. The tool is often used to determine the effects of non-communicable disease, drug misuse and suicide. They believe “years of life lost” is especially appropriate given the range of ages at which individuals have died of COVID-19.

“While death

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