Apple Unveils iPhone 12 With 5G, But Most Won’t Feel Faster Speeds Anytime Soon : NPR

Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the launch of the iPhone 12, which is the first iPhone enabled to harness the power of the 5G network.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the launch of the iPhone 12, which is the first iPhone enabled to harness the power of the 5G network.

Apple

Apple on Tuesday announced the iPhone 12, the first Apple smartphone with 5G-enabled technology that eventually will let data flow at much faster speeds.

“Today is the beginning of a new era for iPhone,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said. “This is a huge moment for all of us.”

But not exactly a huge moment for most consumers, at least not yet.

Eventually, smartphones with 5G capabilities — expected to be 10 to 20 times faster than 4G speeds — will make a big difference for gamers and people who stream videos on mobile,

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Apple unveils new iPhones for faster 5G wireless networks

In a move that may annoy some consumers, Apple will no longer include charging adapters with new phones. It says that will mean smaller, lighter boxes that are more environmentally friendly to ship. Apple, however, separately sells power adapters that cost about $20 and $50, depending on how fast they charge phones.

Apple has one of the most loyal and affluent customer bases in the world, which has many analysts betting the next wave of phones will sell well. The iPhone remains the foundation of Apple’s business.

Apple boasted about the 5G capabilities and brought in Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg to champion the carrier’s network. 5G is supposed to mean much faster speeds, making it quicker to download movies or games, for instance.

But finding those speeds can be a challenge. While telecom operators have been rolling out 5G networks, significant boosts in speed are still uncommon in much of

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New Cadence Clarity 3D Transient Solver Delivers up to 10X Faster System-Level EMI Simulation

System design teams can quickly and accurately simulate large and complex hyperscale, automotive, mobile, and aerospace and defense systems

Cadence Design Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq: CDNS) today expanded its system analysis product line with the introduction of the Cadence® Clarity 3D Transient Solver, a system-level simulation solution that solves electromagnetic interference (EMI) system design issues up to 10X faster than legacy 3D field solvers and offers unbounded capacity. Built on Cadence’s massively parallel matrix solver technology, the Clarity 3D Transient Solver handles workload levels that previously required time-consuming and expensive anechoic test chambers to test prototypes for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) compliance. The new solver is capable of simulating large designs that until now have been impractical or unable to be solved, reducing respins and accelerating time to market. This makes it ideal for many complex applications in the hyperscale computing, automotive, mobile, and aerospace and defense markets. For more

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Nights are warming faster than days. Here’s what that means for the planet.

Climate change can have profound impacts across ecosystems, but rising average temperatures are just one factor among many driving those repercussions. A new study published in late September in Global Change Biology found that nighttime temperatures are increasing at a faster rate compared to daytime temps in most land areas across the Earth. That shift can influence everything from predator-prey dynamics to plant growth.



Nighttime ecology is particularly understudied, with most research focused on the daytime activities of organisms.


© Provided by Popular Science
Nighttime ecology is particularly understudied, with most research focused on the daytime activities of organisms.

“Climate change is already messing things up,” says Daniel Cox, an ecologist at the University of Exeter and lead author of the study. “But the 24-hour asymmetry is adding an extra dimension of complexity [for species].”

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Previous analyses have found that the rising greenhouse gases in our atmosphere are not having an even effect on temperatures from day to night. But Cox says this

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Study: New bedside test means faster diagnosis, treatment of COVID-19

Oct. 8 (UPI) — A rapid, bedside test for COVID-19 delivers results in less than two hours, meaning that appropriate treatment can be initiated earlier for those already hospitalized because of their symptoms, according to a study published Thursday by The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

The standard COVID-19 test uses polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, technology, which amplifies small samples of DNA in order to identify the presence of virus in samples taken from an infected person’s nose or throat.

The PCR test requires samples to be sent to a centralized lab within the hospital for processing, typically takes more than 20 hours to produce results, the researchers said.

The enhanced speed of the bedside, or “point-of-care” tests, also means patients infected with the new coronavirus can be isolated earlier, reducing the risk for transmission to other patients and healthcare workers.

“Our findings are the first to suggest the clinical benefits

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Up To 26 Percent Faster In Games

AMD has announced the 4th Gen Ryzen 5000-series based on the Zen 3 architecture, including the 16-core Ryzen 9 5950X Ryzen 9 5900X. AMD claims they will offer up to 24 percent increase in performance in games at 1080p.

Also announced is the eight-core Ryzen 7 5800X for $449 and Ryzen 5 5600X for $229, all launching in November. AMD also claims Cinebench single-threaded scores in excess of 630 points, which is a huge amount faster than either current Intel or AMD CPUs.

The new CPUs feature a unified eight-core complex with lower latency – all cores have direct access to the L3 cache resulting in up to 19 percent IPC uplift. AMD claims it will be the biggest update to the Zen architecture yet, with a front to

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Greenland On Track To Shed Ice Faster Than In Any Century Over The Past 12,000 Years

A study published this week in the journal Nature concludes that the rate of ice loss for the 21st century of Greenland’s ice sheet is likely to outpace that of any previous century since the end of the last ice-age. 

The research team reconstructed in great detail the movements of the ice sheet for the last 12,000 years using data from glacier deposits and, in modern times, aerial and satellite surveys. Ice-cores provided climate data needed to correlate values like temperature and precipitation with extent of the ice sheet.

A state-of-the-art model was then used to simulate the ice-sheet movements in the last 12,000 years, and the model reproduced the

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Greenland is on track to lose ice faster than in any century over 12,000 years — ScienceDaily

If human societies don’t sharply curb emissions of greenhouse gases, Greenland’s rate of ice loss this century is likely to greatly outpace that of any century over the past 12,000 years, a new study concludes.

The research will be published on Sept. 30 in the journal Nature. The study employs ice sheet modeling to understand the past, present and future of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Scientists used new, detailed reconstructions of ancient climate to drive the model, and validated the model against real-world measurements of the ice sheet’s contemporary and ancient size.

The findings place the ice sheet’s modern decline in historical context, highlighting just how extreme and unusual projected losses for the 21st century could be, researchers say.

“Basically, we’ve altered our planet so much that the rates of ice sheet melt this century are on pace to be greater than anything we’ve seen under natural variability of

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Fortem Technologies Adds New Capabilities to Autonomously Capture a Wider Array of Drone Threats, Including Faster Moving Fixed Wing Drones

Pleasant Grove, UT, Sept. 16, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Fortem Technologies Inc., a leader in airspace security and defense for detecting and defeating dangerous drones, announced today advancements to its SkyDome® System software that allow the Fortem DroneHunter® to autonomously shift into one of three various modes to best defeat a threatening drone. DroneHunter, the world’s premier AI-driven interceptor drone, autonomously determines whether to chase, attack or defend against the threatening drone depending on the drone’s size, speed and trajectory. These advancements allow DroneHunter to pursue and safely capture an even wider range of drone threats including faster fixed wing drones.

When in defense mode, the DroneHunter maneuvers in front of the target drone, anticipating its approach. Once in range, DroneHunter fires the NetGun precisely as the target attempts to pass. The defensive mode position also facilitates a radically faster detect-to-capture-time, as the time previously required to get behind the

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Metallic carbon circuit element enables work on faster, efficient carbon-based transistors — ScienceDaily

Transistors based on carbon rather than silicon could potentially boost computers’ speed and cut their power consumption more than a thousandfold — think of a mobile phone that holds its charge for months — but the set of tools needed to build working carbon circuits has remained incomplete until now.

A team of chemists and physicists at the University of California, Berkeley, has finally created the last tool in the toolbox, a metallic wire made entirely of carbon, setting the stage for a ramp-up in research to build carbon-based transistors and, ultimately, computers.

“Staying within the same material, within the realm of carbon-based materials, is what brings this technology together now,” said Felix Fischer, UC Berkeley professor of chemistry, noting that the ability to make all circuit elements from the same material makes fabrication easier. “That has been one of the key things that has been missing in the big

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