Security firm: WarezTheRemote flaw could turn a Comcast remote into a listening device

Could your cable TV device spy on you? Vulnerability found and patched in Comcast TV remote.

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Security researchers at Guardicore reverse-engineered the firmware update process for a popular Comcast remote to turn the device into a spying tool.

Image: Guardicore

Security firm Guardicore reverse-engineered the firmware update process for Comcast’s XR11 remote to take control of the device. Researchers interrupted the process to turn the voice-control element of the remote into a listening device.

Once the malicious firmware update was in place, researchers used a 16dBi antenna and were able to listen to conversations inside a house from about 65 feet away.

The WarezTheRemote attack could have affected the 18 million remotes in use around the US. After Guardicore disclosed the vulnerability to Comcast, the company developed a fix that was deployed to all units by the end of September. 

SEE: Social engineering: A cheat sheet for business professionals (free

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Chastity cage security flaw could let hackers lock up your penis

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Qiui

A flaw in a smart chastity device that puts your penis on lockdown could get your appendage imprisoned longer than you bargained for, security researchers say.   

The device in question, Qiui’s Cellmate Chastity Cage, encases your favorite organ in a Bluetooth-enabled gadget that a trusted partner can lock and unlock remotely using a mobile app.

The problem, according to security researchers from UK-based Pen Test Partners, is that due to API flaws, a nontrusted party acting from anywhere could not only gain access to precise user location data, but could “prevent the Bluetooth lock from being opened, permanently locking the user in.” 

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“There is no physical unlock,” Pen Test Partners noted Monday in a blog post that details its months-long investigation into the device.

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Saints’ situation exposes flaw in NFL’s contact tracing system

Before the season, the NFL boasted of a new contact-tracing technology that would keep players from getting too close together and that would make it easier to work backward to identify others who need to be tested and/or evaluated in the event a player tests positive. During the season, there’s an apparent problem with the so-called “Proximity Recording Device.”

As noted in the immediate aftermath of the news that Saints had learned late last night that fullback Michael Burton had tested positive for COVID-19, the contact-tracing process identified three people who required further testing, etc. The Saints identified on their own four others who were sitting close enough to Burton on the flight to Detroit that the Proximity Recording Device should have recorded their proximity to Burton. It should have, but it didn’t.

It’s important for the league to be willing to take a hard look at its protocols on

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Grindr flaw allowed hijacking accounts with just an email address

A Grindr vulnerability allowed anyone who knows a user’s email address to easily reset their password and hijack their account. All a bad actor needed to do was type in a user’s email address in the password reset page and then pop open the dev tools to get the reset token. By adding that token to the end of the password reset URL, they won’t even need to access the victim’s inbox — that’s the exact link sent to the user’s email anyway. It loads the page where they can input a new password, giving them a way to ultimately take over the victim’s account.



BERLIN, GERMANY - APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)


BERLIN, GERMANY – APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)

A French security researcher named Wassime

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A security flaw in Grindr let anyone easily hijack user accounts

Grindr, one of the world’s largest dating and social networking apps for gay, bi, trans, and queer people, has fixed a security vulnerability that allowed anyone to hijack and take control of any user’s account using only their email address.

Wassime Bouimadaghene, a French security researcher, found the vulnerability and reported the issue to Grindr. When he didn’t hear back, Bouimadaghene shared details of the vulnerability with security expert Troy Hunt to help.

The vulnerability was fixed a short time later.

Hunt tested and confirmed the vulnerability with help from a test account set up by Scott Helme, and shared his findings with TechCrunch.

Bouimadaghene found the vulnerability in how the app handles account password resets.

To reset a password, Grindr sends the user an email with a clickable link containing an account password reset token. Once clicked, the user can change their password and is allowed back into

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Microsoft warns that hackers are exploiting a severe Windows security flaw



a man and a woman looking at a screen: Windows Zerologon


© Provided by BGR
Windows Zerologon

  • Homeland Security issued a rare warning about a Windows Server vulnerability that would give attackers complete control of every computer on a network.
  • The CISA warning said at the time that it assumes active exploitation is occurring in the wild, advising everyone to apply the August patch that Microsoft release.
  • Microsoft on Thursday noted that it has already observed attacks that incorporate the new Windows flaw.

Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) issued a rare emergency alert last week, over what appears to be one of the worst Windows flaws in recent history. Security researchers have identified a vulnerability so severe that it received a maximum severity score (10.0), prompting the agency to advise all governmental agencies to update their computers using Microsoft’s first patch for the issue that was launched a few weeks ago. The issue is so severe that a

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Feds issue emergency order for agencies to patch critical Windows flaw

Close-up photograph of computer networking components.

The US Department of Homeland Security is giving federal agencies until midnight on Tuesday to patch a critical Windows vulnerability that can make it easy for attackers to become all-powerful administrators with free rein to create accounts, infect an entire network with malware, and carry out similarly disastrous actions.

Zerologon, as researchers have dubbed the vulnerability, allows malicious hackers to instantly gain unauthorized control of the Active Directory. An Active Directory stores data relating to users and computers that are authorized to use email, file sharing, and other sensitive services inside large organizations. Zerologon is tracked as CVE-2020-1472. Microsoft published a patch last Tuesday.

An unacceptable risk

The flaw, which is present in all supported Windows server versions, carries a critical severity rating from Microsoft as well as a maximum of 10 under the Common Vulnerability Scoring System. Further raising that stakes was the release by multiple researchers of proof-of-concept

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Windows Server: Patch this critical flaw now says Homeland Security in emergency warning

Government agencies in the US have until today to patch a Windows Server vulnerability that could give hackers control over federal networks.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has given system administrators until today (21 September) to patch a critical vulnerability in Windows Server that could allow an attacker to hijack federal networks, via a flaw in the Netlogon authentication system.

On 18 September, the DHS’s cybersecurity division issued an emergency directive giving government agencies a four-day deadline to patch the CVE-2020-1472 vulnerability, also known as Zerologon, citing the “unacceptable risk” it posed federal networks.

The flaw enables an unauthorized user to assume control of a network via a flaw in the Microsoft Windows Netlogon Remote Protocol (MS-NRPC), by simply sending a series of Netlogon messages with input fields filled with zeros.

Once compromised, an attacker could make themselves domain admin and reset the domain control password, effectively giving them

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A Bluetooth Flaw Leaves Billions of Devices Vulnerable

The October issue of WIRED took a close, in-depth look at the state of election security. While lots of it isn’t pretty, we did find some pockets of hope. Data scientist Sara-Jayne Terp is on a mission to stamp out misinformation. The former Facebook employees at the nonprofit Acronym are hoping to use the Trump’s 2016 strategies against him. And we dug into the story of STAR-Vote, an audacious plan to secure voting machine tech for good.

There’s more! We talked to Stacey Abrams about how to overcome voter suppression. We looked at how some countries have successfully stymied Russian interference efforts. And we explained how you’ll know for sure that the presidential election results are valid, no matter how loudly Trump yells that they’re going to be rigged.

Plenty of non-election news happened this week as well. Customs and Border Protection seized 2,000 OnePlus Buds, claiming they were counterfeit

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