Florida educators say pandemic “is not over and it’s not going anywhere in the near future”

CBS News is chronicling what has changed in the lives of residents of some of the biggest battleground states in 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic.

It’s been six weeks since Rocky Hannah, Leon County Schools superintendent in North Florida, reopened schools after abruptly closing in the spring due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The county allowed children to return to schools on August 31 in order to avoid potential financial penalties from Florida for not offering in-person options. Forty-four percent came back to in-person classrooms while 55% opted to start the school year remotely.  

“There were a lot of our parents that needed to get back to work, that needed their children in school, and by us giving families those options, I think we absolutely did the right thing,” said Hannah.  

When CBS News spoke with Hannah in July, the county had made an $11 million investment to purchase 32,500 laptops

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States that reopened sooner, such as Texas, Arizona and Florida, experienced summer surges, report says — ScienceDaily

For every two deaths attributed to COVID-19 in the U.S., a third American dies as a result of the pandemic, according to new data publishing Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study, led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University, shows that deaths between March 1 and Aug. 1 increased 20% compared to previous years — maybe not surprising in a pandemic. But deaths attributed to COVID-19 only accounted for 67% of those deaths.

“Contrary to skeptics who claim that COVID-19 deaths are fake or that the numbers are much smaller than we hear on the news, our research and many other studies on the same subject show quite the opposite,” said lead author Steven Woolf, M.D., director emeritus of VCU’s Center on Society and Health.

The study also contains suggestive evidence that state policies on reopening early in April and May may have fueled the

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Tensions and insults in the battle for Florida lay bare America’s divisions | World news

If you wanted a symbol for Donald Trump’s complete takeover of the Republican party, you could do little better than a nondescript shopping mall on the outskirts of Largo in west Florida.

This is a usually quiet intersection in Florida’s quintessential bellwether county, Pinellas, which has voted for the winning presidential candidate in every election since 1980 (bar the disputed 2000 race won by George W Bush).

But eight months ago Cliff Gephart, an enthusiastic Trump supporter and local entrepreneur, transformed a vacant lot – formerly a strip club – into a thriving coffee shop devoted to the president. Business at Conservative Grounds is roaring, despite the pandemic, with hundreds and, they claim, occasionally over a thousand customers, dropping by each day for a cup of coffee, a chat about politics and to purchase from a plethora of Trump themed merchandise. No-one is social distancing or wearing a facemask.


Troubled
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Launch of spy satellite from Florida postponed again

Astronauts make round trip to space station from U.S. soil

NASA astronaut Douglas Hurley (C) waves to onlookers as he boards a plane at Naval Air Station Pensacola to return him and NASA astronaut Robert Behnken home to Houston a few hours after the duo landed in their SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft off the coast of Pensacola, Fla,, on August 2, 2020. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | License Photo

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Powerful Delta Heavy rocket is ready for another launch attempt from Florida

Astronauts make round trip to space station from U.S. soil

NASA astronaut Douglas Hurley (C) waves to onlookers as he boards a plane at Naval Air Station Pensacola to return him and NASA astronaut Robert Behnken home to Houston a few hours after the duo landed in their SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft off the coast of Pensacola, Fla,, on August 2, 2020. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | License Photo

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George Maul, former Florida Tech department head, tsunami expert, had passions for the sea and science

The ocean always beckoned him, sometimes with foreboding.



George Maul, professor of oceanography, marine & environmental systems, is stepping down.


© MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
George Maul, professor of oceanography, marine & environmental systems, is stepping down.

George August Maul warned for years that a killer wave in Florida was inevitable. A powerful tsunami traveling as fast as a jetliner will strike our coast, the Virgin Islands, or elsewhere in the Caribbean. He was convinced: It’s just a matter of time.

He would not live to see the tragedy he often warned of and worked tirelessly to prevent. 

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Maul, an oceanographer and educator with “a disarming smile and limitless curiosity who made a profound impact on marine and environmental science programs at Florida Tech as a department head, advocate, fundraiser and speaker,” succumbed to cancer Wednesday, Florida Institute of Technology officials announced Thursday. 

He was 82.

Maul, 

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Shark attacked snorkeler in Florida Keys ‘almost immediately’ after he entered the water, police say

A snorkeler has suffered a severe shoulder injury after being “attacked almost immediately” by a shark when he entered the waters near a lighthouse in the Florida Keys, police say.

The victim, Andrew Charles Eddy of Atlanta, was airlifted to a medical facility in Miami Sunday morning following the incident at Sombrero Key Light outside of Marathon, the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office says.

“This was a very rare medical crisis for the Florida Keys, but everyone came together – including those witnesses on the boat to 911 communicators to all our emergency responders – in order to ensure this victim received life-saving care,” Sheriff Rick Ramsay said in a statement.

A bull shark swims through deep water off Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The Monroe County Sheriff's Office says boaters spotted one of these sharks in the waters where the attack in the Florida Keys happened this weekend. (iStock)

A bull shark swims through deep water off Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. The Monroe County Sheriff’s Office says boaters spotted one of these sharks in the waters where the attack in the Florida Keys happened this weekend. (iStock)

FISHERMAN SEES 10-FOOT

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IBM, Oracle, ServiceNow, Amazon and Cisco salaries in Florida

  • Florida, the third most populous US state, is known mainly for its tourism and agriculture industries. But the Sunshine State has also become increasingly attractive to tech companies looking to expand their operations.
  • Tech giants, including IBM, Oracle and ServiceNow, have been hiring employees from overseas for their operations in Florida, where the cost of living is known to be more affordable compared to other major tech hubs in California and New York.
  • For example, Cisco hired a technical solutions architect with a salary of $198,000 to $254,000, while IBM hired a senior application developer with a salary of $79,000 to $120,000.
  • Here’s a survey of what IBM, Cisco, Oracle, IBM and ServiceNow pay new hires in Florida, based on disclosure data for permanent and temporary workers filed with the US Office of Foreign Labor Certification in 2020.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Florida is famous as a

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Florida professor develops smartphone adapter to test for COVID-19



a screenshot of a cell phone on a table: Dinglasan’s team will receive $200,000 for their entry in the competition


© Provided by Knoxville WVLT-TV
Dinglasan’s team will receive $200,000 for their entry in the competition

GAINESVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT/WCJB) – A professor at the University of Florida is being honored for his part in creating a smartphone adapter that tests for COVID-19.

Rhoel Dinglasan, a Professor of Infectious Diseases at UF, along with two others, placed second in the National Institute of Health’s Technology Accelerator Challenge.

The CLIP-CAM was designed to test for Malaria and Anemia using saliva. The test was then modified to also test for COVID-19.

The adapter attaches to the iPhone and allows individuals to use a saliva sample to test for COVID-19. Results from the test return the same day.

“The idea is, more people can now use an app on your iPhone, with our adapter, with our test, and basically get tested within half an hour from the comfort of their own home,” said Dinglasen.

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What Georgia Tech players said after the Central Florida game

“I just ran a little option route on the first touchdown. There was nobody in the zone. Or if it is was man, I was going to go right in there. Since it was zone, I just looked for an open space to get in and (Jeff Sims) threw it me. Luckily, I caught it and scored. The run touchdown, I had some great blocks. Shout out to (tight end Jack) Coco. I did the rest from there. Great blocks downfield from the receivers, too.”

Safety Juanyeh Thomas

On his interception:

“I was just doing my job in coverage. Props to our d-lineman who got the hands on the ball to make it go up and then I had the back and I just came through and scooped it up.”

On responding to the loss:

“We’re just going to get back to work tomorrow. Honestly, we haven’t been here before,

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