Chemists create new crystal form of insecticide, boosting its ability to fight mosquitoes and malaria — ScienceDaily

Through a simple process of heating and cooling, New York University researchers have created a new crystal form of deltamethrin — a common insecticide used to control malaria — resulting in an insecticide that is up to 12 times more effective against mosquitoes than the existing form.

The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), may provide a much-needed and affordable insecticide alternative in the face of growing resistance among mosquitoes.

“The use of more active crystal forms of insecticides is a simple and powerful strategy for improving commercially available compounds for malaria control, circumventing the need for developing new products in the ongoing fight against mosquito-borne diseases,” said Bart Kahr, professor of chemistry at NYU and one of the study’s senior authors.

“Improvements in malaria control are needed as urgently as ever during the global COVID-19 crisis,” added Kahr. “The number of

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How a toxic chromium species could form in drinking water — ScienceDaily

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, brought much-needed attention to the problem of potentially toxic metals being released from drinking water distribution pipes when water chemistry changes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology have investigated how hexavalent chromium, known as Cr(VI), can form in drinking water when corroded cast iron pipes interact with residual disinfectant. Their findings could suggest new strategies to control Cr(VI) formation in the water supply.

The metal chromium, known as Cr(0), is found in cast iron alloy, which is the most widely used plumbing material in water distribution systems. As pipes corrode, a buildup of deposits, known as scale, forms on the pipes’ inner walls. Trace chemicals in water can react with scale, forming new compounds that could be released into the water. Some of these compounds contain Cr(VI), which, at high doses, can cause lung cancer, liver damage, reproductive issues and developmental

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Key control mechanism allows cells to form tissues and anatomical structures in the developing embryo

Sticking together
Determination of neural progenitor cell-cell de-adhesion forces using micropipette aspiration. Credit: IST Austria

Under a microscope, the first few hours of every multicellular organism’s life seem incongruously chaotic. After fertilization, a once tranquil single-celled egg divides again and again, quickly becoming a visually tumultuous mosh pit of cells jockeying for position inside the rapidly growing embryo.


Yet, amid this apparent pandemonium, cells begin to self-organize. Soon, spatial patterns emerge, serving as the foundation for the construction of tissues, organs and elaborate anatomical structures from brains to toes and everything in between. For decades, scientists have intensively studied this process, called morphogenesis, but it remains in many ways enigmatic.

Now, researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria have discovered a key control mechanism that cells use to self-organize in early embryonic development. The findings, published in Science on Oct. 2, shed light on a

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Why Some Stars Never Form Planets

The planetary paradigm has shifted so quickly and so radically in the last quarter century that is easy to forget that only a few decades ago, one would be hard-pressed to find any professional astronomer who would stake their careers on the idea that most stars harbor planets. But although the overwhelming majority of stars may harbor some form of planet, not all stars are capable of forming planets.

During the first two decades of looking for planets that circle

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Mechanical Technology Incorporated Announces Filing of Form 10 Registration Statement & Leadership Announcements

ALBANY, N.Y., Sept. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Mechanical Technology, Incorporated (“MTI” or the “Company”), a publicly traded company (OTC Pink: MKTY) headquartered in Albany, New York, announces today that it has filed a Form 10 Registration Statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) to register its common stock under Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). Once the Form 10 goes effective, which, unless withdrawn, will be on November 29, 2020, MTI will once again be subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act and will resume filing annual, quarterly, and current reports, and annual proxy statements with the SEC. The Company also expects that its common stock will move from being quoted on the OTC Pink – Current Information tier to the OTCQB Venture Market tier of the OTC Markets Group quotation system upon effectiveness of the Form

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Black holes so big we don’t know how they form could be hiding in the universe

Black holes can get big … really big. But just how big? It’s possible they could top out at over a trillion times more massive than the sun. That’s 10 times bigger than the largest known black hole so far.



a close up of a light in the dark: Illustration of a black hole.


© Provided by Live Science
Illustration of a black hole.

But could these monsters truly exist in our universe? A team of researchers has come up with a plan to go hunting for them. And if they exist, they could help us solve the mysteries of how the first stars appeared in the cosmos.

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Related: The biggest black hole findings

The demographics of the dark

If you want to go shopping for black holes in the universe, unfortunately you only have two basic sizes: kind of small and gigantic. You know that frustrating feeling you get when the online store is out of your size of that amazing

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Mathematicians May Have Figured Out How ‘Stone Forests’ Form

There are many wondrous geologic formations in nature, from Giant’s Causeway in Ireland to Castleton Tower in Utah, and the various processes by which such structures form is of longstanding interest for scientists. A team of applied mathematicians from New York University has turned its attention to the so-called “stone forests” common in certain regions of China and Madagascar. These pointed rock formations, like the famed Stone Forest in China’s Yunnan Province, are the result of solids dissolving into liquids in the presence of gravity, which produces natural convective flows, according to the NYU team. They described their findings in a recent paper published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

ARS TECHNICA

This story originally appeared on Ars Technica, a trusted source for technology news, tech policy analysis, reviews, and more. Ars is owned by WIRED’s parent company, Condé Nast.

Coauthor Leif Ristroph told Ars that

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