Nobel Prize Winners In Chemistry And Physics Discuss Shattering Gender Norm, Redefining Women’s Roles

The first Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded 119 years ago, and on Wednesday for the first time in its history, two women won without having to share the prize with a man. Their groundbreaking development may shift the perception of women in scientific roles, and continue to disrupt the centuries-old mindset that women are second to men in innovation or in any field. 

Dr. Jennifer Doudna, a biochemist at UC Berkeley and French researcher Dr. Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Max Planch Institute accepted the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic scissors, a

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How a lack of confidence among women led to the gender gap in tech

  • Matthew J. Liberatore and William Wagner are business professors who studied performance across men and women in mid-level jobs, and asked research subjects to rate how they thought they did. 
  • While there were only insignificant differences in performance, they found women were strikingly less confident in how they performed than men. 
  • It’s hard to know why this is the case, but studies suggest women tend to believe they’re less skilled at STEM-related tasks, including math and technology. 
  • Narrowing the gender gap is going to require more than simply promoting equality in the workforce — schools, universities, and companies need to start initiatives to boost confidence in young women to go into STEM fields. 
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In the workplace, women are now as good as men when it comes to computing performance, but there is still a gender gap when it comes to confidence, according to

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A major study in India offers insights into on how the spread of the virus differs by age and gender.

An ambitious new study of nearly 85,000 coronavirus cases in India and nearly 600,000 of their contacts, published Wednesday in the journal Science, offers important insights not just for India, but for other low- and middle-income countries.

India now has more than six million cases, second only to the United States.

Among the findings of the study: The median hospital stay before death from Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus, was five days in India, compared with two weeks in the United States, possibly because of limited access to quality care. And the trend in increasing deaths with age seemed to drop off after age 65 — perhaps because Indians who live past that age tend to be relatively wealthy and have access to good health care.

The contact tracing study also found that children of all ages can become infected with the coronavirus and spread it to others

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Policy-makers discuss ways to address gender gap in new Science Tech and Innovation Policy : The Tribune India

New Delhi, September 22

Low percentage of Indian women in science and gender gap, especially in terms of women leaders in the subject, and ways to address them in the new Science Technology and Innovation Policy (STIP), 2020, were discussed at a webinar on Tuesday, the Department of Science and Technology said.

Vijay Bhatkar, the president of Vijnana Bharati (VIBHA), who presided over the discussion, emphasised that sustainability and self-reliance is possible only when women are given their due importance.

Several issues in terms of the low institutional mechanism to nurture women innovators, age-barrier issues, leaky pipeline, funding for women-led start-ups, leadership, gender bias and the need for women entrepreneurs, inclusive and diverse science technology and innovation ecosystem while addressing stereotypes with regard to family and parenting were deliberated upon.

At the discussion, Akhilesh Gupta, the head of STIP, 2020, presented some major interventions suggested during the track-two expert consultations,

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Boiling points: 8 ways in which The Leadership reveals STEMM’s gender problems | Dark Matter Distribution: The Leadership

The ‘likeability’ and not being ‘difficult’ trap

For women, there’s an inverse relationship between success and likeability. The fate of figures such as Hillary Clinton prove that the more ambition a woman exercises, the less palatable she may be perceived to be. In The Leadership, brilliant female scientists reveal the hostility they’ve encountered during field work, often undertaken in remote, high-pressure locations. Science communicator Fern Hames recalls working in an environment with 28 men and being told “we don’t have women scientists”. She also reveals that although a male colleague once left shotgun holes in her field hut, she didn’t want to be seen as ‘difficult’ by reporting it: “I didn’t want to make waves, it was my first proper job.” It’s an extreme example that illustrates how women who are successes in their fields can be vilified for simply turning up and doing their jobs.

“I grew up in a family where it was a given that girls can do anything, then suddenly it was ‘no, actually you can’t’. It was an enormous disappointment” - Fern Hames



  • “I grew up in

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