AMD Promises Major Desktop CPU Gains, Previews Next-Gen GPUs

While the clock speeds for AMD’s  (AMD) – Get Report latest desktop CPUs are similar to those of their predecessors, it promises architectural changes will deliver major performance gains.

And that in turn has major implications not only for AMD’s desktop offerings, but also upcoming notebook and server CPU refreshes.

As expected, AMD unveiled its anticipated Ryzen 5000 desktop CPU line — the first products to rely on its next-gen, Zen 3, CPU core microarchitecture — during a Thursday event that was live-streamed on its website.

AMD’s Ryzen 5000 Desktop CPU Line

For now, the line features 4 CPUs: the 16-core Ryzen 9 5950X, the 12-core Ryzen 9 5900X, the 8-core Ryzen 7 5800X and the 6-core Ryzen 5 5600X. The CPUs will be available on Nov. 5.

With AMD once more relying on Taiwan Semiconductor’s  (TSM) – Get Report 7-nanometer (7nm) manufacturing process node, clock

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Nvidia intros new Ampere GPUs for visual computing

Nvidia on Monday unveiled its latest batch of technology focused on the areas of graphics, AI, enterprise and edge computing, robotics, and remote collaboration. The company, which is holding its virtual GTC 2020 event this week, introduced the CloudXR on AWS platform, the Omniverse design and collaboration platform, and new Ampere GPUs for visual computing.

The RTX A6000 and the A40 are Nvidia’s latest GPU designs based on Ampere architecture. The RTX A6000 is designed for the new era of visual computing, Nvidia said. The GPU will replace the Turing version of the Quadro, while the A40 — which is a passive cooling version of the same card — is the successor to the RTX 6000 and RTX 8000 GPUs. 

Nvidia said the GPUs are targeted at visual compute use cases such as rendering and virtual workstations, with Nvidia AI and machine learning software running on the entire product line.

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Amazon Luna servers will run Windows games directly on Nvidia T4 GPUs

Amazon’s newly announced Luna streaming service will run Windows games on a standard Amazon Web Services EC2 G4 instance, the company told Ars Technica in a roundtable discussion. Those server instances sport Nvidia T4 GPUs equipped with 320 Turing Tensor cores and support for Nvidia’s GRID virtualization drivers.

Luna’s server architecture is significantly different from that of Google’s Stadia, which uses Linux-based data servers and Vulkan’s open source graphics APIs. That means extra work for Stadia developers who have to port their existing games to Stadia’s environment, which can sometimes lead to apparent graphical snafus.

The precise amount of

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