Now forgotten, New Orleans was once dotted with ‘truck farms’ as city grew | Entertainment/Life

They abounded in Gentilly. They checkerboarded Marrero. They are eponymous with Metairie.

“They” were truck farms, and from the 1870s to the 1950s, their crop-lined fields dominated the fringes of greater New Orleans, from Arabi to Marrero, from Algiers to Kenner.



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Truck fams by the Fair Grounds and DeSaix Place in Gentilly, in the 1920s.




A truck farm is a small agricultural enterprise devoted to raising vegetables, fruit, dairy and other delicate edibles. “Truck” comes not from the vehicle they were transported in — yet to be invented in the late 1800s — but from the French torquer, meaning exchange or barter, as many such farmers traded their yield at the town market.

Truck farms were sometimes known as market gardens, and their bounty fed both the family and as well as the local community. “Truck” came to be synonymous with fresh fruit and vegetables.

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How Signal Grew From Privacy App to Tech Powerhouse

Ama Russell and Evamelo Oleita had never been to a protest before June. But as demonstrations against systemic racism and police brutality began to spread across the U.S. earlier this year, the two 17 year-olds from Michigan, both of whom are Black, were inspired to organize one of their own.

Seeking practical help, Oleita reached out to Michigan Liberation, a local civil rights group. The activist who replied told her to download the messaging app Signal. “They were saying that to be safe, they were using Signal now,” Oleita tells TIME. It turned out to be useful advice. “I think Signal became the most important tool for protesting for us,” she says.

Within a month, Oleita and Russell had arranged a nonviolent overnight occupation at a detention center on the outskirts of Detroit, in protest against a case where a judge had put a 15 year-old Black schoolgirl in

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While a Fort Worth murder suspect grew old, the DNA science that jailed him grew up

The brother of a woman killed in 1974 said the technology law enforcement now uses to track down criminals has advanced greatly, and those hiding guilt should pray because they are being hunted and eventually they will be caught and punished.

Jim Walker made these comments on Tuesday, the day after Fort Worth police arrested a 77-year-old man who is facing a capital murder charge in the slaying of his sister, Carla Walker. The 17-year-old girl was abducted during a Valentine’s week date, then sexually assaulted and found dead three days later.

Glen Samuel McCurley, identified as the suspect in Walker’s slaying, remained in the Tarrant County Jail on Thursday with bond set at $100,000, according to jail records.

Edward Hueske, who was hired as a criminalist by the Fort Worth Police Department a month before Walker was killed, said this is a good resolution to this case.

“The

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