Call me! How technology is changing our hand gestures | Science

Name: Hand gestures.

Age: Older than language.

Appearance: Demonstrative hand signals encoding commonly understood meanings.

I don’t follow you. Can you give me an example of what you’re talking about? Certainly: placing a fist alongside your head, thumb and little finger extended, in the manner of a man trying to scratch his chin and his ear at the same time.

OK. And what does that mean? Can’t you guess?

Does it mean: “My ear and my chin both itch”? No! It means: “Call me.”

What? How do you figure that? It’s miming holding a phone – the thumb is the earpiece, the little finger is the mouthpiece, and the fist is pretending to grab the long bit in between.

You’ve seen a phone, right? I guess it wouldn’t make much sense if you’ve only ever used a flat, rectangular mobile.

You’re correct, it wouldn’t. Give me a better example.

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Amazon’s New Hand Payment Technology Could Change In-Store Shopping Forever

New Amazon technology, introduced at two Amazon Go stores this week, lets shoppers pay for purchases by holding their hands over a scanner. The system, called Amazon One, may herald a new way of identifying yourself and paying for things that could change the way people shop, enter concerts, use public transportation, and many other things.

You’ve probably used a fingerprint scanner or facial recognition to unlock your smartphone. You already know that your voice and your retinas can be used to positively identify you and give you access to your various devices, and possibly to secure government or corporate facilities. Amazon’s new Amazon One technology takes biometrics a step further by allowing shoppers to pay for purchases with a simple scan of their palms.

To stave off privacy concerns, the company says it is encrypting biometric data before storing it in the cloud, and that the data will be

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The ancient Neanderthal hand in severe COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

Since first appearing in late 2019, the novel virus, SARS-CoV-2, has had a range of impacts on those it infects. Some people become severely ill with COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, and require hospitalization, whereas others have mild symptoms or are even asymptomatic.

There are several factors that influence a person’s susceptibility to having a severe reaction, such as their age and the existence of other medical conditions. But one’s genetics also plays a role, and, over the last few months, research by the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative has shown that genetic variants in one region on chromosome 3 impose a larger risk that their carriers will develop a severe form of the disease.

Now, a new study, published in Nature, has revealed that this genetic region is almost identical to that of a 50,000-year old Neanderthal from southern Europe. Further analysis has shown that, through interbreeding,

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Sport and memory go hand in hand — ScienceDaily

If sport is good for the body, it also seems to be good for the brain. By evaluating memory performance following a sport session, neuroscientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) demonstrate that an intensive physical exercise session as short as 15 minutes on a bicycle improves memory, including the acquisition of new motor skills. How? Through the action of endocanabinoids, molecules known to increase synaptic plasticity. This study, to be read in the journal Scientific Reports, highlights the virtues of sport for both health and education. School programmes and strategies aimed at reducing the effects of neurodegeneration on memory could indeed benefit from it.

Very often, right after a sporting exercise — especially endurance such as running or cycling — one feels physical and psychological well-being. This feeling is due to endocannabinoids, small molecules produced by the body during physical exertion. “They circulate in the blood and easily

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China Stock Market May Hand Back Friday’s Gains

(RTTNews) – The China stock market on Friday wrote a finish to the two-day slide in which it had retreated more than 25 points or 0.7 percent. The Shanghai Composite Index now sits just beneath the 3,340-point plateau although it figures to head south again on Monday.

The global forecast for the Asian markets is soft with continued pressure expected on the technology stocks, along with concerns over the economic recovery. The European and U.S. markets were down on Friday and the Asian markets are tipped to follow that lead.

The SCI finished sharply higher on Friday following gains from the financial shares, property stocks and oil and insurance companies.

For the day, the index soared 67.65 points or 2.07 percent to finish at 3,338.09 after trading between 3,268.53 and 3,338.32. The Shenzhen Composite Index jumped 32.92 points or 1.51 percent to end at 2,219.91.

Among the actives, Industrial and

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