Google’s merger with ITA helped it grow into the giant that the Justice Department is scrutinizing

Google critics and rivals have long warned the search engine is threatening countless industries from shopping to travel by consistently pointing people to its own products and services on the biggest search platform on the Web. And those competing against Google to win over consumers say that the search engine forces them to pay their biggest rival in advertising dollars just to show up.

Google’s dominance in search has drawn more regulatory scrutiny and criticism from rivals and lawmakers in recent months, something that is expected to culminate in the Department of Justice filing an antitrust suit against the company in the coming weeks. Lawmakers are also preparing new legislation to rein in tech’s power, following the publication last week of a congressional investigation that found Google engaged in anticompetitive tactics.

The case by the Justice Department would be its biggest swing yet to rein in the power of tech

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Kuwait-Based Floward’s Abdulaziz Al Loughani On How Preparedness Helped In Navigating COVID-19 Impact

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You’re reading Entrepreneur Middle East, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

This article is part of a series on pioneering entrepreneurs in Kuwait that Entrepreneur Middle East has built in collaboration with Kuwait Finance House. Kuwait Finance House is considered a pioneer in Islamic finance or Sharia’a compliant banking, with it being the first Islamic bank established in 1977 in the State of Kuwait, and is today one of the foremost Islamic financial institutions in the world.
 

Floward, a Kuwait-based flower and gift delivery service, has secured a US$2.75 million funding, led by KSA firm Impact46 fund, with the participation of Faith Capital, BNK and other regional companies.

Founded in 2006 as floral, gift retailer and distribution company, it moved to

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Research has helped underpin the formation of a nature reserve in Vietnam

Research has helped underpin the formation of a nature reserve in vietnam
An endangered red-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix nemaeus) photographed in Khe Nuoc Trong. Credit: Bjornolesen.com/Viet Nature

Research by the University of Leeds and Utrecht University has helped secure the highest government protection for internationally-important Vietnamese forests. Over the past five years, conservation organization Viet Nature, and its partners World Land Trust, IUCN National Committee of the Netherlands (IUCN NL), Birdlife International and researchers from the University of Leeds and Utrecht University have been working to protect the Khe Nuoc Trong forests—the last substantial area of lowland forest in Vietnam.


In August, the Vietnamese government agreed to formally protect Khe Nuoc Trong’s 22,132-hectare tract of Annamite lowland evergreen forests as a Nature Reserve, the country’s highest standard of protection.

The move delivers a safer home for 40 globally threatened species brought to brink of extinction by loggers and poachers. This includes singing gibbons, the spectacular peacock-like crested argus birds and the critically

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2020 Nobel Physics Winners Helped Find Black Holes

An awful lot of time elapsed between the day Roger Penrose was walking to work in 1964 and the moment his phone rang while he was in the shower on the morning of Oct. 6, 2020. Back then, his walk was interrupted by “some strange feeling of elation,” as he told the Associated Press yesterday, about the moment he had his first glimmers of insight into the equations that would eventually make him famous. It was surely with another kind of elation that he answered his phone yesterday to learn that those same equations—which were the first to prove the existence of black holes—had earned the 89-year-old University of Oxford mathematical physicist the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics.

Penrose was not alone alone in his delight. Also honored this year were astronomers Andrea Ghez, 55, of the University of California, Los Angeles; and Reinhard Genzel, 68, of the Max

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Former NASA astronaut who helped build new Boeing spacecraft won’t fly on first mission

Former NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson says he no longer plans to command the first-ever crewed mission of the Boeing Starliner, the spacecraft he’s spent the last decade helping to build.



a man wearing sunglasses: Boeing astronaut Chris Ferguson looks on during a press conference at the Kennedy Space Center, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019. They will be part of the first crew to fly on the Starliner spacecraft some time next year.


© Terry Renna/AP
Boeing astronaut Chris Ferguson looks on during a press conference at the Kennedy Space Center, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019. They will be part of the first crew to fly on the Starliner spacecraft some time next year.

NASA and Boeing made the announcement Wednesday morning, saying Ferguson made the decision for “personal reasons.” Ferguson said in a follow-up tweet that he plans to prioritize his family, and he “made several commitments which I simply cannot risk missing.”

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He did not provide further details.

Ferguson, an engineer and veteran of three Space Shuttle missions, left the NASA astronaut corps in 2011 to help Boeing design and build a next-generation spacecraft that could

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Ancient Sharks’ Cannibalistic Behavior May Have Helped Them Become Giants

KEY POINTS

  • Megalodons grew to be up to 50 feet in length
  • The prehistoric sharks were the biggest among the carnivorous or non-planktivorous shark species
  • Researchers say a unique behavior called intrauterine cannibalism may have helped megalodons grow very large

The ancient megalodon sharks’ predatory behavior inside the womb might have helped them achieve their gigantic size, a new study shows. The shark species grew to be up to 50 feet in length before going extinct about 3.6 million years ago.

In a study published in the journal Historical Biology, a team of researchers explained that most sharks give birth through a method known as ovoviviparity, where the embryos develop inside eggs that remain inside the mother’s body until they are ready to be hatched. In some aggressive shark types like lamniform, the early-hatched embryos often eat the unhatched eggs, a behavior called intrauterine cannibalism, the researchers noted. Megalodons belong

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Cannibalism in the womb may have helped make megalodon sharks giants

The largest sharks ever to hunt in Earth’s oceans may have gotten so big thanks to their predatory behavior in the womb, scientists report October 5 in Historical Biology.

The idea emerged from a study that first analyzed the sizes and shapes of modern and ancient shark teeth, using those data to estimate body sizes of the fish. Paleobiologist Kenshu Shimada of DePaul University in Chicago and colleagues focused on an order of sharks called lamniformes, of which only about 15 species still exist today, including fierce, fast great white and mako sharks as well as filter-feeding basking sharks (SN: 8/2/18).

Well over 200 lamniform species existed in the past, some of them quite large, Shimada says. But none is thought to have rivaled Otodus megalodon, commonly called megalodon, which lived between about 23 million and 2.5 million years ago. Determining just how giant these creatures were

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Study shows Massachusetts response to COVID-19 in nursing homes helped stem infection rate — ScienceDaily

A paper just published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that adherence to infection control processes, especially proper wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) and cohorting strategies, such as grouping residents based on their risk of infection or whether they tested positive for COVID-19, was significantly associated with declines in weekly infection and mortality rates.

Lewis A. Lipsitz, M.D., Director of the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research and Chief Academic Officer at Hebrew SeniorLife, was the lead author on the report, which analyzed the process and outcome of Massachusetts’ novel state-wide COVID-19 infection control program developed to stem the rate of infection among vulnerable nursing home populations.

In April 2020, Massachusetts nursing homes became a hotspot for COVID-19 infections and associated deaths. In response, Governor Charles Baker allocated $130 million in additional nursing home funding for two months. Funding was contingent on compliance with

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Some Lucrative Card Bonuses; How Ruth Bader Ginsburg Helped Women Get Credit Cards

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Paved the Way for Women to Get Credit Cards

If you are a woman who holds a credit card, you owe it in large part to the efforts of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. In Reed v. Reed, the landmark 1971 case highlighted in the 2018 film “On The Basis Of Sex”, Ginsburg co-wrote a brief arguing that a provision of Idaho state law which said men were to be preferred to women in appointing the administrators of an estate violated the Constitution. The court agreed, finding unanimously that dissimilar treatment, “on the basis of sex,” between men and women was unconstitutional. [NextAdvisor]

Here’s Who Qualifies for Chase Sapphire Preferred’s New Massive, Limited-Time 80,000-Point Welcome Bonus

Chase just released its highest ever welcome bonus: eligible new Chase Sapphire Preferred Card applicants can earn 80,000

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How genetic science helped expose a secret coronavirus outbreak in Iowa

POSTVILLE, Iowa — It wasn’t until their colleagues began to disappear that workers at Agri Star Meat and Poultry realized there was a killer in their midst.

First came the rumors that rabbis at the kosher plant had been quarantined. Then a man who worked in the poultry department fell ill. They heard whispers about friends of friends who had been stricken with scorching fevers and unbearable chills — characteristic symptoms of the novel coronavirus.

Where was the contagion coming from?

No one would say. Not Agri Star’s wealthy owner, who didn’t shut down production lines after cases were confirmed among workers. Not the Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which closed a complaint containing multiple allegations against the plant without an inspection. Not Iowa Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds, whose administration threatened to prosecute officials who released covid data and did not conduct testing at the plant until seven weeks

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