Research finds rate of body dysmorphia is 12 times higher among gymgoers with eating issues — ScienceDaily

People with eating disorders are 12 times more likely to be preoccupied with perceived flaws in their physical appearance than those without, according to new research published in the journal Eating and Weight Disorders.

Researchers from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) surveyed more than 1,600 health club members recruited via social media. They found the number of people with body dysmorphic disorder — a mental condition marked by obsession with perceived flaws in appearance which are not noticed by others — was 12 times higher among people with suspected eating disorders.

Around 30% of participants had indicated eating disorders, and the researchers noted that 76% of those people also suffered from body dysmorphia.

The paper also found no significant associations between body dysmorphia, sexuality and social media use, although there was association with gender, with women being more likely to show symptoms of body dysmorphia.

Lead author Mike Trott, PhD

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Financials, tech stocks drive Australian market higher

(Reuters) – Australian shares settled higher on Tuesday for the seventh straight session, as financials jumped on some economic optimism and dividend hopes, and technology stocks tracked Wall Street higher.

FILE PHOTO: Pedestrians are reflected in a window displaying stock prices at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) in Sydney, Australia, February 13, 2018. REUTERS/David Gray

The S&P/ASX 200 index .AXJO rose 1% to 6,195.70, adding about 7% during the seven sessions of gains through Tuesday.

Financials .AXFJ closed 1.7% higher, after having hit their highest level since Aug. 12 earlier in the session, with the “Big Four” banks adding between 1.7% and 3.3%.

“There are some signs that there is a bit of optimism for the economy moving forward, and that’s helping banks have a pretty good run,” said James Tao, a market analyst at CommSec.

Last week, the Australian government pledged billions in tax cuts and measures to boost

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Tech Stocks Power Markets Higher

U.S. stocks jumped sharply Monday, propelled by technology stocks that led major indexes to their highest closing values in nearly six weeks.

All three major U.S. indexes climbed for the fourth consecutive session. The S&P 500 rose 57.09 points, or 1.6%, to 3534.22—its second-highest close in history. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rallied 250.62 points, or 0.9%, to 28837.52.

The Nasdaq Composite surged 296.32 points, or 2.6%, to 11876.26, its third-highest close. All three indexes are closing in on their early September highs after a recent stretch of volatility.

Megacap companies including

Apple

and

Amazon.com

were among the strongest performers, jumping 6.4% and 4.8%, respectively. Apple is set on Tuesday to unveil a 5G-enabled iPhone, which some investors hope could fuel the kind of sizable growth that stemmed from previous technological advancements for the iPhone.

Amazon

is kicking off its Prime Day of shopping deals Tuesday.

The robust gains build

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Missouri University Of Science And Technology Receives $300 Million Gift, The Largest In Missouri Higher Education History

Missouri University of Science and Technology(Missouri S and T) announced today that it had received a $300 million donation, the largest single gift in the history of Missouri higher education. St. Louis businessman and Missouri S and T alum Fred Kummer and his wife June are giving the money to a foundation they created that will support several initiatives at the university.

The Kummers’ gift will be administered by The Kummer Institute Foundation. Funds from the foundation will support several new initiatives at Missouri S&T, including:

  • A new research and development entity modeled after other university-affiliated centers like the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California and the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. The new organization will be the home to four new research
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Strong gains for technology stocks send Wall Street higher

NEW YORK — Solid gains for technology stocks pushed Wall Street higher Monday, tacking more gains onto last week’s rally. The S&P 500 rose 1.6%. Big Tech companies including Apple and Amazon, whose businesses have been thriving despite the pandemic, led the way higher. Companies that depend more on broad growth in the economy didn’t rise as much. Investors are still waiting to see whether Washington can get past its partisan divide to deliver more support for the economy. This week also marks the start of earnings reporting season, when CEOs will detail how their companies fared from July through September.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE: AP’s earlier story appears below.

Stocks are pushing higher on Wall Street in afternoon trading Monday and tacking more gains onto last week’s market rally, its best in three months.

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Gutenberg Technology Helps Cengage Accelerate Digital-First Content Disruption in Higher Education

Content Platform Provider Supports eReader capabilities for Cengage Unlimited’s library of 14,000 eTextbooks

Gutenberg Technology (GT), provider of the premier end-to-end content management platform, today announced its partnership with Cengage, an education and technology company and the largest US-based provider of teaching and learning materials for higher education, to bring eTextbooks and study tools to millions of college students across the U.S. GT’s publishing platform, has aided Cengage in rapidly bringing its content library to market, hosting more than 14,000 eTextbooks that are available to Cengage subscribers.

Through this partnership, GT helps support the content engine behind several product offerings within Cengage Unlimited, the first all-access subscription service for the college textbook and course materials market, which has helped more than 2.2 million college students save more than $200 million on textbooks and course materials. Cengage leverages the power of GT’s authoring tool to transform static text, media, and assessments

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Acute kidney injury linked to higher rate of death within three months of intracerebral hemorrhage — ScienceDaily

Patients who suffer an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) face an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) during their hospitalization. AKI can lead to sudden kidney failure, kidney damage or even death. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care have determined which ICH patients are at the highest risk for this kidney injury so doctors can take precautions to prevent it. They also examined how the commonly-used blood pressure lowering drug nicardipine contributes to AKI.

“Over the past five years, clinicians have been concerned about AKI as they see patients who present with ICH, then develop kidney failure and require dialysis,” said lead researcher Adnan I. Qureshi, MD, a professor of clinical neurology at the MU School of Medicine. “What we need is a more global body approach to improve the outcome of patients with ICH, rather than just focusing on the brain.”

Qureshi’s team

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The SPDR Innovative Technology ETF Can Run Higher



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an image that says 10 best ETFs of 2020

This article is a part of InvestorPlace.com’s Best ETFs for 2020 contest. Bret Kenwell’s choice for the contest is the SPDR Innovative Technology Fund (NYSEARCA:XITK).



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an image that says 10 best ETFs of 2020

It was another solid quarter for the FactSet Innovative Technology SPDR ETF (NYSEARCA:XITK), even though both it and the Nasdaq fell quite a bit from the quarterly highs. Still, the XITK ETF tacked on a 16.1% gain in the third quarter versus a gain of “just” 11% for the index. 

Given that the exchange-traded fund surged more than 47% in the second quarter, last quarter’s gains were impressive. Again that handedly outperformed the Nasdaq, which rallied 30.6% in Q2. 

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Some investors look at the XITK ETF and say, “No, that’s way too risky. I’ll stick

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Envisioning the Future of Higher Ed in a Post-pandemic World — Campus Technology

Education Trends

Envisioning the Future of Higher Ed in a Post-pandemic World

In a recent ASU+GSV session, five college presidents gave their views of what’s next for higher education.

What does the future of higher education look like? A panel of five university and college presidents offered their crystal-ball visions in a recent session during the recent ASU+GSV Summit, which took place online this week. Moderator Michelle Marx, chancellor of the University of Colorado Denver, asked panelists — each representing a unique higher education model — to look forward five years and beyond.

More Embedded Tech as a Given

For Eloy Oakley, chancellor of California Community Colleges, the largest system of public education in the country with 116 colleges and more than 2 million students, teaching and learning will certainly have more embedded technology. “Prior to the pandemic, we had been in a long and

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People with Parkinson’s disease have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

A new study of approximately 80,000 patients shows that people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have a 30% higher risk of dying from COVID-19 than people without the neurodegenerative condition.

The new analysis conducted by researchers with University of Iowa Health Care based on patient data in the TriNetX COVID-19 research network suggests that Parkinson’s disease is an independent risk factor for dying from COVID-19.

The UI research team led by neurologists Qiang Zhang, MD, and Nandakumar Narayanan, MD, PhD, identified the COVID-19 patient cohort as of July 15 and analyzed the mortality data eight weeks later. They found that 5.5% (4,290 out of 78,355) of COVID-19 patients without PD died compared to 21.3% (148 of 694) COVID-19 patients who also had PD.

However, the patients with PD were generally older, more likely to be male, and less likely to be African American than the patients without PD. All of these

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