New class of highly effective inhibitors protects against neurodegeneration — ScienceDaily

Neurobiologists at Heidelberg University have discovered how a special receptor at neuronal junctions that normally activates a protective genetic programme can lead to nerve cell death when located outside synapses. Their fundamental findings on neurodegenerative processes simultaneously led the researchers at the Interdisciplinary Center for Neurosciences (IZN) to a completely new principle for therapeutic agents. In their experiments on mouse models, they discovered a new class of highly effective inhibitors for protecting nerve cells. As Prof. Dr Hilmar Bading points out, this novel class of drugs opens up — for the first time — perspectives to combat currently untreatable diseases of the nervous system. The results of this research were published in Science.

The research by Prof. Bading and his team is focused on the so-called NMDA receptor. This receptor is an ion channel protein that is activated by a biochemical messenger: the neurotransmitter glutamate. It allows calcium to

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The Air Force’s Secret New Fighter Jet Could Pack This Highly Classified Tech

From Popular Mechanics

In September, the U.S. Air Force shocked the world when it announced it had secretly designed, built, and tested a new fighter jet—all in the astonishingly short span of just one year.

✈ You love badass planes. So do we. Let’s nerd out over them together.

The secret new fighter jet—if it’s even a new “fighter” at all—is part of the Next Generation Air Dominance (NGAD) program, an Air Force project designed to supplement and eventually replace the F-22 Raptor. The Air Force has identified five major new technologies it believes will be necessary for the program. But what are they?

A new Congressional Research Service (CRS) report on NGAD gives a quick rundown of the program. The secret new fighter jet, which Air Force acquisition Secretary Will Roper officially announced on September 15, is just part of a program that will likely include crewed and uncrewed

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B&W Environmental to Supply Highly Efficient Cooling Technology for Pulp Mill in Brazil

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) (NYSE: BW) announced today that its B&W Environmental segment will design and supply its highly efficient SPIG S.p.A. cooling towers for a pulp mill operated by LD Celulose S.A. in the Triângulo Mineiro region in Brazil. The contract is valued at approximately $2 million.

LD Celulose S.A. is a joint venture between the Austria-based Lenzing Group and the Brazil-based Duratex. The plant will produce 500,000 tons of soluble cellulose annually.

“B&W Environmental’s specialized SPIG cooling solutions can be tailored for the needs of the pulp & paper industry and for soluble cellulose production,” said SPIG Managing Director Alberto Galantini. “We see a growing market for our services in South America, especially in Brazil.”

“For this project, we will provide SPIG cooling tower cells with concrete structures, engineered to meet our customer’s specifications,” Galantini said. “We thank LD Celulose for this opportunity and look forward to a

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Study shows automatic enrollment, paired with option to opt-out, is highly effective at boosting parents’ participation — ScienceDaily

Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children’s literacy. Now new research shows that parents’ participation in such programs can be boosted exponentially with one simple tweak: automatic enrollment, combined with the ability to opt out.

The new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy appears in the Journal of Child and Family Studies.

In recent years, mounting research evidence has shown texting to be an effective, low-cost, scalable approach for engaging parents in their children’s learning. Some studies suggest text message interventions via tips for parents on how to support their child’s development can put young children’s learning 2-3 months ahead.

Yet getting parents to enroll in these beneficial programs can be challenging. With that in mind, researchers designed a study to test strategies for increasing program participation.

In the study, researchers from Duke, New York

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Science More Highly Valued by UK Due to COVID-19

Science more highly valued by UK public due to COVID-19, but barriers to STEM education threaten future scientific development

BRACKNELL, UK / ACCESSWIRE / October 6, 2020 / Science and scientists have gained a renewed level of significance in the minds of the UK public due to COVID-19, according to new research released today from 3M, the science-based technology company.

In its 2020 State of Science Index (SOSI), conducted before and during the height of the pandemic, scepticism of science has declined amongst Britons for the first time in three years from 40 per cent pre-pandemic to 29 per cent today – representing one of the biggest declines of all countries surveyed in this annual global study.

As a result of COVID-19, three out of four (77 per cent) are now more likely to believe that science plays a critical role in solving public health crises and 92 per cent

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Science More Highly Valued by UK Due to COVID-19 – Press Release

Science more highly valued by UK public due to COVID-19, but barriers to STEM education threaten future scientific development

BRACKNELL, UK / ACCESSWIRE / October 6, 2020 / Science and scientists have gained a renewed level of significance in the minds of the UK public due to COVID-19, according to new research released today from 3M, the science-based technology company.

In its 2020 State of Science Index (SOSI), conducted before and during the height of the pandemic, scepticism of science has declined amongst Britons for the first time in three years from 40 per cent pre-pandemic to 29 per cent today – representing one of the biggest declines of all countries surveyed in this annual global study.

As a result of COVID-19, three out of four (77 per cent) are now more likely to believe that science plays a critical role in solving public health crises and 92 per cent

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Highly effective antibodies against the coronavirus were identified — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have identified highly effective antibodies against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and are now pursuing the development of a passive vaccination. In this process, they have also discovered that some SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to tissue samples from various organs, which could potentially trigger undesired side effects. They report their findings in the scientific journal Cell.

Initially, the scientists isolated almost 600 different antibodies from the blood of individuals who had overcome COVID-19, the disease triggered by SARS-CoV-2. By means of laboratory tests, they were able to narrow this number down to a few antibodies that were particularly effective at binding to the virus. Next, they produced these antibodies artificially using cell cultures. The identified so-called neutralizing antibodies bind to the virus, as crystallographic analysis reveals, and thus prevent the pathogen from entering cells and reproducing. In addition,

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Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with enhanced stability and minimised lead leakage

Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with enhanced stability and minimised lead leakage
A researcher tests the function of the solar cells inside the glove box. Credit: City University of Hong Kong

While the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PVSCs)—a future of solar cells—has already greatly improved in the past decade, the problems of instability and potential environmental impact are yet to be overcome. Recently, scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) have developed a novel method which can simultaneously tackle the leakage of lead from PVSCs and the stability issue without compromising efficiency, paving the way for real-life application of perovskite photovoltaic technology.


The research team is co-led by Professor Alex Jen Kwan-yue, CityU’s Provost and Chair Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science, together with Professor Xu Zhengtao and Dr. Zhu Zonglong from the Department of Chemistry. Their research findings were recently published in the scientific journal Nature Nanotechnology, titled “2-D metal-organic framework for stable perovskite solar cells

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