Astronomers Observe Star Being ‘Spaghettified’ by a Supermassive Black Hole

Artist’s impression of a star undergoing spaghettification near a supermassive black hole.

Artist’s impression of a star undergoing spaghettification near a supermassive black hole.
Image: ESO

A star 215 million light-years away has been obliterated by a supermassive black hole, making it the closest observation to date of stellar spaghettification.

Spaghettification doesn’t sound very scientific, but it’s a fairly accurate description of what actually happens.

A doomed star caught in the orbit of a supermassive black hole will eventually hit a kind of gravitational sweet spot that turns everything to shit. No longer capable of keeping its physical integrity, the star begins to rapidly collapse in a process known as a fast-evolving tidal disruption event. When this happens, stellar debris bursts out from the star, forming a long, thin stream, half of which gets sucked toward the black hole; the other half is blown back into space. The thin stream eventually catches up to and slams into itself, releasing energy and

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Scientists Watch a Black Hole Eat a Star

  • Astronomers have witnessed a tidal disruption event, where a star whose material was shredded by a nearby supermassive black hole releases an bright flash of light.
  • The TDE is helping scientists understand more about the gruesome spaghettification process.
  • The flare occurred just 215 million light-years away from Earth, closer than any other previously observed tidal disruption event.

    Astronomers have spotted a rare and radiant pulse of light—the last gasp of a dying star that has been sucked toward the center of a supermassive black hole and shredded into sinuous strings of stardust. This process is delightfully called spaghettification, but make no mistake: it’s gruesome.

    🌌 You love our badass universe. So do we. Let’s nerd out over it together.

    “When a black hole devours a star, it can launch a powerful blast of material outwards that obstructs our view,” Samantha Oates, an astronomer at the University of Birmingham, said in

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    Astronomers witness star being “turned into spaghetti” by black hole

    Researchers found that when a star is "spaghettified" a blast of material is launched outwards (ESO)
    Researchers found that when a star is “spaghettified” a blast of material is launched outwards (ESO)

    Astronomers have witnessed the final moments of a star being devoured by a supermassive black hole – and it’s not pretty.

    A blast of light from 215 million light years away from Earth allowed astronomers to study the “tidal disruption event” in unprecedented detail.

    Stars that wander too close to vast supermassive black holes are shredded (“spaghettified”) into thin streams of material, which are in turn devoured, releasing flashes of light.

    Matt Nicholl, a Royal Astronomical Society research fellow and lecturer at the University of Birmingham, said: “The idea of a black hole ‘sucking in’ a nearby star sounds like science fiction. 

    “But this is exactly what happens in a tidal disruption event.”

    Read more: Astronomers find closest black hole to Earth

    Thomas Wevers, a European Space Observatory (ESO) fellow in Santiago, Chile, said:

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    Astronomers see a black hole ‘spaghettify’ a star in real time

    Artist’s impression of star being tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole.  


    ESO/M. Kornmesser

    It’s one of those astounding events that sounds like science fiction, but is just plain science. Astronomers say they were able to capture in unprecedented detail the process of a star being ripped into strips and devoured by a black hole. 

    The powerful phenomenon caught the attention of scientists when a new blast of light near a known supermassive black hole was spotted by telescopes around the world. Months worth of follow-up observations made it clear they were seeing the destruction of a far-off sun as it happened.

    “In this case the star was torn apart with about half of its mass feeding — or accreting — into a black hole of one million times the mass of the sun, and

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    Astronomers capture a black hole shredding star into spaghetti strands

    • Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory observed a black hole sucking in a faraway star, shredding it into thin strands of stellar material.
    • This process, known as “spaghettification,” happens because of black holes’ powerful gravitational force.
    • At 215 million light-years away, this spaghettification process is the closest ever observed by astronomers. 
    • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

    Astronomers have captured a rarely-seen event: a flare of light caused by a black hole devouring a nearby star like spaghetti.

    Observed in the Eridanus constellation, about 215 million light-years away from Earth, the star’s destruction is the closest such event astronomers have ever observed. 

    “When an unlucky star wanders too close to a supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy, the extreme gravitational pull of the black hole shreds the star into thin streams of material,” study author Thomas Wevers, a fellow at the European Southern Observatory in Santiago,

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    ESO telescopes record last moments of star devoured by a black hole — ScienceDaily

    Using telescopes from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and other organisations around the world, astronomers have spotted a rare blast of light from a star being ripped apart by a supermassive black hole. The phenomenon, known as a tidal disruption event, is the closest such flare recorded to date at just over 215 million light-years from Earth, and has been studied in unprecedented detail. The research is published today in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

    “The idea of a black hole ‘sucking in’ a nearby star sounds like science fiction. But this is exactly what happens in a tidal disruption event,” says Matt Nicholl, a lecturer and Royal Astronomical Society research fellow at the University of Birmingham, UK, and the lead author of the new study. But these tidal disruption events, where a star experiences what’s known as spaghettification as it’s sucked in by a black hole,

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    Scientists record last moments of star devoured by black hole — ScienceDaily

    A rare blast of light, emitted by a star as it is sucked in by a supermassive black hole, has been spotted by scientists using telescopes from around the world.

    The phenomenon, known as a tidal disruption event, is the closest flare of its kind yet recorded, occurring just 215 million light-years from Earth. It is caused when a star passes too close to a black hole and the extreme gravitational pull from the black hole shreds the star into thin streams of material — a process called ‘spaghettification’. During this process some of the material falls into the black hole, releasing a bright flare of energy which astronomers can detect.

    Tidal disruption events are rare and not always easy to study because they are usually obscured by a curtain of dust and debris. An international team of scientists led by the University of Birmingham were able to study this

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    Black hole kills star by ‘spaghettification’ as telescopes watch

    Telescopes have captured the rare light flash from a dying star as it was ripped apart by a supermassive black hole

    This rarely seen “tidal disruption event” — which creates spaghettification in stars as they stretch and stretch – is the closest such known event to happen, at only 215 million light-years from Earth. (For comparison, the nearest star system to Earth – Alpha Centauri — is roughly 4 light-years away, and the Milky Way is roughly 200,000 light years in diameter.) One light-year is the distance light travels in a year, about 6 trillion miles (10 trillion kilometers). 

    “The idea of a black hole ‘sucking in’ a nearby star sounds like science fiction. But this is exactly what happens in a tidal disruption event,” the new study’s lead author Matt Nicholl, a lecturer and Royal Astronomical Society research fellow at the University of Birmingham in the United

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    We Watched As A Nearby Star Was Sucked In And ‘Spaghettified’ By A Monster Black Hole, Say Scientists

    A star in the act of being devoured by a supermassive black hole. It’s the latest incredible cosmic phenomenon tracked and traced by astronomers using giant telescopes.

    This iconic “tidal disruption event”—named “AT2019qiz”—occurred 215 million light-years away, which makes it the closest observed so far. 

    “The idea of a black hole “sucking in” a nearby star sounds like science fiction, but this is exactly what happens in a tidal disruption event,” said Dr Matt Nicholl, a lecturer and Royal

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    Huawei’s Rivals Are Already Filling A $27 Billion Hole Left By US Sanctions

    After more US sanctions have all-but-crippled the future of Huawei’s global networks business — and its efforts to become the dominant 5G provider — dollar signs are already materializing for its rivals.

    At the crux of Huawei’s withdrawal is an annual $27 billion opportunity for its competitors — including Nokia, Ericsson and Samsung — to become the go-to providers of 5G and other telecommunication services to domestic carriers, says Ryan Koontz, an analyst at Rosenblatt Securities. “It’s a massive economic transition,” says Koontz. “It’s relatively urgent for these carriers to make the change.” 

    The multi-billion dollar market opportunity, which hinges on Huawei’s sales figures for the year ended September, will not evaporate overnight, Koontz says, but will likely be absorbed over the next three to four years. 

    Because

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