Second giant ‘murder hornet’ escapes after it was captured by scientists in Washington State

Another “murder” hornet that could have led scientists to its nest has evaded experts once more, following a lost signal.



a hand holding a fork and knife: A live Asian giant hornet is affixed with a tracking device using dental floss on October 7 before being released in a photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture.


© Karla Salp/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP
A live Asian giant hornet is affixed with a tracking device using dental floss on October 7 before being released in a photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Last week, scientists with the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA)captured a live Asian giant hornet — known as “murder” hornets for their ability to decimate honeybee populations — and used dental floss to attach a tracking device to its body, which “worked quite well,” said Sven Spichiger, WSDA’s managing entomologist, during a news conference on Monday.

When scientists released the hornet into the wild onto an apple tree, they were initially successful in tracking the insect, but after some time they were unable to locate a signal when

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Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet

Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet
The world’s largest hornet, the Asian giant hornet has been encountered in the Pacific Northwest. New research at Washington State University predicts where the hornet could find suitable habitat, both in the U.S. and globally, and how quickly it could spread, should it establish a foothold. Credit: WSDA

Researchers at Washington State University have predicted how and where the Asian giant hornet, an invasive newcomer to the Pacific Northwest, popularly dubbed the “murder hornet,” could spread and find ideal habitat, both in the United States and globally.


Sharing their discoveries in a newly published article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team found that if the world’s largest hornet gains a foothold in Washington state, it could spread down much of the west coast of the United States.

The Asian giant hornet could also find suitable habitat throughout the eastern seaboard and populous parts of

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