IRS Adds QR Codes To Tax Bills

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is adding barcode technology to its tax notices.

Starting this month, the IRS will add QR codes to certain tax notices. QR stands for quick response, since the code can convey a lot of information to your smartphone in a short period of time. It’s similar to a barcode but can transfer more information, including internet addresses.

QR codes are a combination of pixels. Each piece of the code conveys specific information – the combination can generate a lot of information. To read the information, you scan the QR Code with a smartphone.

The IRS is using the technology to allow taxpayers to scan codes on two particular notices, the CP14 or CP14 IA, with their smartphone and go directly to IRS.gov. From there, taxpayers can securely access their account, set up a payment plan or contact the Taxpayer Advocate Service. 

A CP14 notice

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IRS under investigation for buying Americans’ smartphone location data

  • The IRS is under investigation by the US Treasury’s Inspector General for reportedly buying Americans’ smartphone location data in order to track them.
  • Democratic Sens. Ron Wyden and Elizabeth Warren called for the investigation last month after IRS agents told the senators that the agency bought people’s smartphone location data from a company called Venntel.
  • Venntel sells location data scraped from people’s smartphones that are gathered from normal apps like games, exercise apps, and weather apps.
  • While government agencies typically need to obtain a search warrant before gathering personal information from people’s phones, buying location data directly from private companies like Venntel lets them sidestep that requirement.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The IRS is under investigation by the US Treasury’s Inspector General over its practice of buying people’s smartphone data from private surveillance companies, according to a letter from the Inspector General obtained by Business Insider.

In

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IRS extends nonfilers deadline to Nov. 21 for 9 million to claim stimulus check. Here’s what to do

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The IRS this month is contacting 9 million Americans who may still be owed economic stimulus money.


Angela Lang/CNET

The IRS on Monday extended the deadline for up to 9 million Americans who didn’t receive a first stimulus check to claim a missing payment. The original Oct. 15 deadline for nonfilers — a group of people who typically don’t file their taxes, including older adults, retirees and SSDI recipients — has been pushed back to Nov. 21.

“We took this step to provide more time for those who have not yet received a payment to register to get their money, including those in low-income and underserved communities,” IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig said in a statement.

For the most part, the first wave of stimulus checks went out automatically this spring and summer, without the intended recipients having to do anything but meet the qualifications. But a subset of

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7 IRS Tax Lessons From John McAfee’s Tax Evasion Indictment

Colorful tech figure and sometimes taunter of the IRS John David McAfee has been indicted for federal income tax evasion. Given his profile, particularly such antics as proclaiming that he isn’t filing tax returns but the IRS can come find him, it may not seem a surprise that McAfee is in some serious hot water. He has long been completely out of the antivirus company that bears his name, but he has still been in the news in numerous controversial ways over the last decade. Everyone has to file tax returns of course, even McAfee, and failing to file can be criminal. The indictment dates from June 15, 2020, but it was just unsealed following McAfee’s arrest in Spain where he is awaiting extradition to the U.S. This is an indictment, so the charges have yet to be proven. But it may be hard for McAfee to explain himself after

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IRS owes 9 million people stimulus checks, but they have to register by Oct. 15. What to know

 money-dollar-bills-cash-stimulus-taxes-covid-coronavirus-america-7039

The IRS this month is contacting 9 million Americans who may still be owed economic stimulus money.


Angela Lang/CNET

After the IRS sent the bulk of the first stimulus check, the agency noticed something was wrong. One large group — an estimated 9 million people — didn’t receive their lawful payment. 

For the most part, the first wave of stimulus checks went out automatically this spring and summer, without the intended recipients having to do anything but meet the qualifications. But a subset of folks did have to take a further step, mainly people who typically don’t file their taxes, a group that can include older adults, retirees and SSDI recipients.

The IRS is now in the process of sending letters to people who may be eligible. But the window is closing for nonfilers to claim their $1,200 checks by the end of 2020. Oct. 15

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Tech Mogul’s Secrecy Crumbles in IRS Chase of ‘Record’ Trove

(Bloomberg) — Robert T. Brockman was just putting the finishing touches on a new private equity fund when worrisome news arrived. Law enforcement agents had raided the home of a tax lawyer in Texas who had worked for him.



a view of a city street: The flag of Bermuda flies in the city of Hamilton, Bermuda.


© Photographer: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
The flag of Bermuda flies in the city of Hamilton, Bermuda.

A Houston businessman who had made his fortune selling software to auto dealers, Brockman grew nervous, according to an account filed in Bermudian court. Could the Internal Revenue Service be delving into his taxes and business interests?

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Using an app called Silent Phone that makes calls untraceable, he spoke with an adviser in Bermuda about whether the Houston lawyer might ultimately reveal Brockman’s links to offshore trusts and spur an investigation, according to the filing.

The gravity of the matter became apparent two weeks after the August 2018 raid. That’s when IRS agents

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