Technology Standards, ‘Tech Debt’ Among Issues Media Will Face After An Unusual 2020

Technology development has sped up, rather than slowed down, during 2020, as the global coronavirus pandemic has led companies to quickly implement workflows they might have only imagined before having to deploy widespread remote operations.

At the same time, the scramble to move operations off-premises has pushed technologists to focus on next steps, including the need for standards that will apply across media supply chains and to govern media’s use of artificial intelligence among other things.

That, in a nutshell, captures a conversation among four technology leaders and a pair of rising stars that is set to take place Monday, Oct. 19, at 4 p.m. ET.

All six of the technologists participating in the “Predictions for 2021,” will have just received TVNewsCheck’s 2020 Women in Technology Awards in a presentation ceremony webcast live by TVNewsCheck.

Among their predictions:

  • Media companies that have scrambled to implement solutions to support
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Apple issues third iOS 14.2, iPadOS 14.2, tvOS 14.2, watchOS 7.1 developer betas

Apple is on a brand new round of developer betas, with the third batch available to download for iOS 14.2, iPadOS 14.2, watchOS 7.1, and tvOS 14.2.

The newest builds can be downloaded via the Apple Developer Center for those enrolled into the test program, or via an over-the-air update on devices running the beta software. Public betas typically arrive within a few days of the developer versions, via the Apple Beta Software Program website.

The latest batch of betas replace the second round, issued on September 29, and the first on September 17, one day after Apple released the milestone versions of each operating system.

Continuing to be the outlier of the group, macOS Big Sur has yet to see a release of its milestone version, and has previously undertaken nine beta releases. The ninth build appeared on September 29, while the eighth was on September 22.

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Research finds rate of body dysmorphia is 12 times higher among gymgoers with eating issues — ScienceDaily

People with eating disorders are 12 times more likely to be preoccupied with perceived flaws in their physical appearance than those without, according to new research published in the journal Eating and Weight Disorders.

Researchers from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) surveyed more than 1,600 health club members recruited via social media. They found the number of people with body dysmorphic disorder — a mental condition marked by obsession with perceived flaws in appearance which are not noticed by others — was 12 times higher among people with suspected eating disorders.

Around 30% of participants had indicated eating disorders, and the researchers noted that 76% of those people also suffered from body dysmorphia.

The paper also found no significant associations between body dysmorphia, sexuality and social media use, although there was association with gender, with women being more likely to show symptoms of body dysmorphia.

Lead author Mike Trott, PhD

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Vardhan Cautions against Virus Spread ahead of Festivals, Winter; Ministry Issues Guidelines to Manage Co-infections

Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan on Tuesday cautioned people to be more careful and take the necessary precautions against coronavirus ahead of the festive season, saying the respiratory virus could show its effect more rapidly during the winters.

He said social distancing, wearing masks and repeatedly washing hands are crucial to prevent spread of the virus. Vardhan said if the necessary precautions are taken by people, then the chain of transmission of the virus will break.

“The next 2-3 months will have festivals and coincide with the winter season. As you are aware, the…respiratory virus could show its effect more rapidly during the winter,” he said. Vardhan, who is also the Science and Technology minister in addition to being the country’s health minister, was addressing the directors of the institutes under the Department of Biotechnology (DBT).

He said if people act carelessly and forget about precautions while celebrating festivals, then

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Researcher to measure middle schoolers’ data science knowledge in context of social issues

Golnaz Arastoopour Irgens

Golnaz Arastoopour Irgens, assistant professor in Clemson’s education and human development department.
Image Credit: College of Education

A Clemson University faculty member will use an award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to examine middle school students’ data science knowledge and practices through the lens of social issues and gauge students’ sense of empowerment to positively change communities through data science.

Golnaz Arastoopour Irgens, assistant professor of learning sciences in the Clemson University College of Education, said it is a common misconception that data is neutral or free from the influence of social issues or that data has no effect on social issues. She said it is often the case that technology informed by data science, such as search engines or facial recognition software, has been shown to either reinforce discrimination or mischaracterize minority groups.

Because humans design these forms of technology and many more make decisions based on them,

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New York issues $15,000 fines to Orthodox Jewish institutions over COVID violations

Five Orthodox Jewish institutions in New York City were fined $15,000 for alleged violations of the health code amid the coronavirus pandemic for having more than 10 people inside their religious facilities, according to reports.

The religious spaces in Borough Park, the site of protests last week, weren’t shut down because police don’t have the authority.

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New restrictions temporarily limit the size of religious gatherings in the COVID-19 hot spots. The restrictions limit attendance at all houses of worship to 25% capacity, or a maximum of 10 people.

Six coronavirus clusters have cropped up in Brooklyn and Queens, as well as Broome, Orange and Rockland counties. The state has closed schools and nonessential businesses in those areas and limited gatherings.

The number of New Yorkers hospitalized with the coronavirus continues to rise, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Saturday, as authorities heightened their focus on banning

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Full return for Weston’s younger students raises staffing issues

WESTON — Students are expected to fully return at the lower levels later this month, raising concerns for the school board about what that means for those still distance learning.

The Board of Education supported the lower schools switching to fully in-person and expanding the middle school’s hybrid learning to a full day beginning Oct. 26. But members raised concerns the plan the district’s administration presented Thursday could require additional staffing dedicated to distance learning. The high school would remain in its hybrid early-dismissal model.

“While in this document we are recommending hybrid full day, our energies are substantially on getting everybody back in,” Superintendent William McKersie said at a BOE meeting Thursday. “We want everybody back in — certainly K-5 we want them back in and that’s what the document is saying.”

The possibility of having to hire additional staff to designate teachers for the voluntary distance learning program

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Cornell’s First Science Communication and Public Engagement Minor Graduates Tackle Health, Racial and Medical Issues

Benjamin Fields ’20 and Serena Stern ’20 wrote to The Sun with how the science communication and public engagement minor has helped them in their post-Cornell endeavors.

Nearly 1 in 3 Americans do not believe the actual coronavirus death toll is as high as its official count. Scholars have suggested that COVID-19 health literacy is a serious and underestimated problem, making the importance of communicating science more prevalent than ever.

The science communication and public engagement minor was designed for science, technology, engineering and math majors who want to break the divide between scientists and the general public by translating complicated science concepts into more digestible terms — something that is particularly pertinent to a global pandemic.

Benjamin Fields ’20 and Serena Stern ’20 were the first two graduates to receive the science communication and public engagement minor. After graduating from Cornell, the two are now applying the skills they

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Communications Platform Experiencing Connection, ‘Degraded’ Performance Issues

With the start of the workweek underway, many at-home workers woke up to a Slack (WORK) outage that has made it difficult to send messages or use the platform at all.

Customers reported on Twitter that they were having problems with the communications site on Monday. The program’s name even trended on the social media platform nationwide with many users saying that “If Slack isn’t working today neither are we.”

Slack updated its status site multiple times on Monday, noting the issues.

The status site said there are issues with the platform which is preventing some users

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Tool could be used to simulate interventions on issues such as polarization — ScienceDaily

Northwestern University researchers have developed the first quantitative model that captures how politicized environments affect U.S. political opinion formation and evolution.

Using the model, the researchers seek to understand how populations change their opinions when exposed to political content, such as news media, campaign ads and ordinary personal exchanges. The math-based framework is flexible, allowing future data to be incorporated as it becomes available.

“It’s really powerful to understand how people are influenced by the content that they see,” said David Sabin-Miller, a Northwestern graduate student who led the study. “It could help us understand how populations become polarized, which would be hugely beneficial.”

“Quantitative models like this allow us to run computational experiments,” added Northwestern’s Daniel Abrams, the study’s senior author. “We could simulate how various interventions might help fix extreme polarization to promote consensus.”

The paper will be published on Thursday (Oct. 1) in the journal Physical Review

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