NASA drops joyful Jupiter flyover video from Juno’s perspective

Take a moment to bask in the beauty of a Jupiter flyover.


NASA/Kevin Gill; video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

No Earth roller coaster could possibly compare to a 130,000 mph (209,000 kph) flyover of Jupiter. That’s what NASA’s Juno spacecraft experienced in June with a close pass of the gas giant. 

A striking new NASA video re-creates the scenery from this thrilling space adventure.

Citizen Scientist Kevin Gill, who also works as a software engineer at NASA, harnessed data from Juno’s JunoCam, the camera that’s been delivering lavish views of Jupiter since the spacecraft arrived at the planet in 2016.

“The sequence combines 41 JunoCam still images digitally projected onto a sphere, with a virtual ‘camera’ providing views of Jupiter from different angles as the spacecraft speeds by,” said NASA in a statement on Thursday.

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Jupiter Killed Earth-Like Environment On Hellish Planet

KEY POINTS

  • Jupiter’s early gravitational pull may have killed Venus’ habitable surrounding
  • Venus has extreme temperatures that can kill any form of life
  • The case on Venus serves as a warning for Earth to avoid a similar temperature rise

Venus would have been capable of hosting life similar to Earth if not only for Jupiter’s interference in its planetary motion. The planet, named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty, was thrown off by the largest planet in our solar system from its original orbit around the sun.

The planet, also dubbed as Earth’s twin, was not as hostile to life forms as to how it is today, if not for Jupiter’s behavior in the solar system, according to a study published in the Planetary Science Journal. The study said Jupiter changed its planetary course, moving closer and then away again from the sun. Since it is a huge

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Venus might be habitable today, if not for Jupiter

Venus might be habitable today, if not for Jupiter
Composite of images taken by Japanese spacecraft Akatsuki of Venus. Credit: JAXA / ISAS / DARTS / Damia Bouic

Venus might not be a sweltering, waterless hellscape today, if Jupiter hadn’t altered its orbit around the sun, according to new UC Riverside research.


Jupiter has a mass that is two-and-a-half times that of all other planets in our solar system—combined. Because it is comparatively gigantic, it has the ability to disturb other planets’ orbits.

Early in Jupiter’s formation as a planet, it moved closer to and then away from the sun due to interactions with the disc from which planets form as well as the other giant planets. This movement in turn affected Venus.

Observations of other planetary systems have shown that similar giant planet migrations soon after formation may be a relatively common occurrence. These are among the findings of a new study published in the Planetary Science Journal.

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Solving the strange storms on Jupiter — ScienceDaily

At the south pole of Jupiter lurks a striking sight — even for a gas giant planet covered in colorful bands that sports a red spot larger than the earth. Down near the south pole of the planet, mostly hidden from the prying eyes of humans, is a collection of swirling storms arranged in an unusually geometric pattern.

Since they were first spotted by NASA’s Juno space probe in 2019, the storms have presented something of a mystery to scientists. The storms are analogous to hurricanes on Earth. However, on our planet, hurricanes do not gather themselves at the poles and twirl around each other in the shape of a pentagon or hexagon, as do Jupiter’s curious storms.

Now, a research team working in the lab of Andy Ingersoll, Caltech professor of planetary science, has discovered why Jupiter’s storms behave so strangely. They did so using math derived from a

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The strange storms on Jupiter

The strange storms on Jupiter
(Click for animation) Under some experimental conditions, and on Jupiter, cyclonic storms repel each other, rather than merging. Credit: California Institute of Technology

At the south pole of Jupiter lurks a striking sight—even for a gas giant planet covered in colorful bands that sports a red spot larger than the earth. Down near the south pole of the planet, mostly hidden from the prying eyes of humans, is a collection of swirling storms arranged in an unusually geometric pattern.


Since they were first spotted by NASA’s Juno space probe in 2019, the storms have presented something of a mystery to scientists. The storms are analogous to hurricanes on Earth. However, on our planet, hurricanes do not gather themselves at the poles and twirl around each other in the shape of a pentagon or hexagon, as do Jupiter’s curious storms.

Now, a research team working in the lab of Andy Ingersoll,

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New NASA photo of Jupiter from Hubble shows shrinking Great Red Spot

  • The Hubble Space Telescope took a striking new photo of Jupiter that shows how the planet’s weather patterns have evolved.
  • The gas giant’s most famous storm – its Great Red Spot – has been shrinking. Another storm nearby may be turning from white to red.
  • Meanwhile, clouds in Jupiter’s northern hemisphere may indicate a new storm is brewing. 
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Majestic Jupiter, our solar system’s belligerent big brother, is putting its best side forward. A sharp new image from the Hubble Space Telescope shows the giant planet’s wild, ever-evolving weather – revealing both short- and long-term changes.

In the northern hemisphere, turbulent clouds could indicate the formation of a new swirling storm, while down south, a long-lived storm just below and about half the size of the Great Red Spot seems to be slowly changing colour from white to red.

If that’s not enough, off

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