Blue Origin launches, lands NASA moon landing sensor experiment

Oct. 13 (UPI) — Blue Origin successfully launched a NASA moon landing experiment aboard the company’s reusable New Shepard rocket Tuesday morning in Texas.

Liftoff took place from the company’s launch facilities about 150 miles east of El Paso.

The capsule separated from the rocket minutes into the flight and spent about 3 minutes at the height of an arc just over the Kármán line, the altitude at which space begins.

The rocket booster, with NASA sensors mounted on the exterior, landed smoothly about 7 minutes, 30 seconds after launch. The capsule landed with the aid of parachutes a few minutes later, kicking up a cloud of dust and sand.

The NASA experiment is part of the agency’s Tipping Point program, which seeks to demonstrate technology that can be adopted by private industry.

The project includes a collection of sensors designed to help locate a safe site on the moon

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Into the Mother Lands interview: Twitch invests in an RPG show led by people of color

Critical Role has played an important roll in the rise of actual play RPG livestreams and podcasts, turning these from a niche to a major player in the streaming ecosystem. According to measurement firm StreamElements, viewers watched an aggregated 19.5 million hours of such shows on Twitch an YouTube, a 1,142% increase over 2018. 2020’s numbers are likely higher.

And one of the best of these actual play shows is Rivals of Waterdeep, a Wizards of the Coast-backed project. It started in 2018 in conjunction with Dungeons & DragonsWaterdeep: Dragon Heist storyline. It’s now in its 8th season, and the project features some of what I consider the deepest role-playing you can find in any D&D show.

Tanya DePass is one of the Rivals‘ players. And she’s teaming up with B. Dave Walters, whose credits include the transmedia Electropunk project, A Darkened Wish (an actual play

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LG Wing lands at Verizon on Oct. 15 for $1,000

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Angela Lang/CNET

The LG Wing, a unique dual-screen phone that you swivel open, will launch on Verizon on Oct. 15 for $1,000. The phone will be available for preorder starting on Thursday. 

The Wing has two screens, one of which swivels on top of the other, allowing for things like multitasking and unique gameplay experiences. It also has three rear cameras, including an ultra-wide camera with a built in gimbal to stabilize video even while you’re moving around a lot. 

CNET’s Lynn La says the LG Wing isn’t for everybody, but found that the phone’s unique design gives multitasking and recording video a boost. LG estimates that the phone is durable enough to survive 200,000 rotations over the course of five years. 

Verizon is offering a handful

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Ice Cube lands new sci-fi role | Entertainment

Ice Cube is to star in a new sci-fi film.

The 51-year-old rapper and actor has teamed up with Universal for the as-yet untitled project, which will be produced by Patrick Aiello and Timur Bekmambetov.

Plot details on the movie are vague but it is described as a grounded sci-fi film that explores the themes of privacy versus surveillance. Rich Lee is directing from a script written by Kenneth Golde.

The film has been greenlighted by Universal and is set to begin production next month. The studio are reportedly encouraged to use the new technology that has been developed by Bekmambetov.

The new technology allows production to be completed remotely with cast and crew working from their individual separate locations, particularly useful amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Hip hop legend Ice Cube has took on a variety of film roles since making his acting drama in Los Angeles gang drama ‘Boyz

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Reusable Chinese Space Craft Lands Returns Earth

The Chinese government has announced the safe return of a reusable spacecraft, called Chongfu Shiyong Shiyan Hangtian Qi (CSSHQ), to Earth, after spending two days in orbit. 

The unmanned spacecraft was launched on Friday, September 4th, 2020, from the Jiuquan Satelite Launch Center in northwest China’s section of the Gobi Desert, before safely returning to its scheduled landing site. The spacecraft’s purpose was reportedly to test reusable technologies that will provide ‘technological support for the peaceful use of space’, although no information about what technologies were tested has been made public. 

Adding to this, no pictures nor information of the spacecraft itself have been released into the press either, although the Chinese government did say that it was launched via a Long March-2F carrier rocket. This makes CSSHQ the 14th mission for the rocket, also used by the Chinese to send astronauts into orbit, as well as its own space

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