‘Very High Risk’ Two Large Pieces Of Space Junk Will Collide This Week

A defunct Russian satellite and a spent Chinese rocket just floating around high over Earth could smash into each other within a few days, potentially creating a big mess in orbit with potentially dire long-term consequences.

LeoLabs, which tracks space debris, put out the alert on Tuesday warning that the two large hunks of junk will come within 25 meters of each other and have up to a twenty percent chance of colliding Thursday evening.

That’s considered way too close for comfort by space standards. The two objects have a combined mass of 2,800 kilograms and if they were to smash into each other, the “conjunction” could create thousands of new pieces of space junk that would put actual functioning satellites at risk.

Astronomer Jonathan McDowell, who keeps a close eye on objects in orbit, identified the old crafts

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Earth grows large crystals, rare elements in just minutes

Oct. 7 (UPI) — Scientists have gained new insights into crystal growth rates inside pegmatites, veinlike formations that host some of the planet’s biggest crystals, as well as valuable elements such as tantalum, niobium and lithium.

Magma cooling time typically controls the size of crystals — when magma cools quickly, crystals remain microscopic, and when it cools slowly, crystals have time to grow.

But pegmatite crystals appear to upend this logic, researchers said in a study published this week in the journal Nature Communications.

“Pegmatites cool relatively quickly, sometimes in just a few years, and yet they feature some of the largest crystals on Earth,” Cin-Ty Lee, professor of geology at Rice University, said in a news release. “The big question is really, ‘How can that be?'”

To determine the growth rates of pegmatite crystals, scientists turned to the rare elements that are often found inside pegmatites.

“It was more

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Findings come from new analysis of large epidemiological dataset — ScienceDaily

Children appear to be at greater risk of having high blood pressure when their mothers had the high blood pressure condition called preeclampsia during pregnancy — but this adverse association may be reduced or even eliminated for children who were exposed to higher levels of vitamin D in the womb, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The findings, based on an analysis of data on 754 mother-child pairs in Massachusetts, suggest that higher vitamin D levels in pregnancy may help protect children born to preeclamptic women from developing high blood pressure. High blood pressure in childhood is associated in turn with hypertension and heart disease in adulthood.

The study was published online October 5 in JAMA Network Open.

“There is increasing evidence that cardiovascular disease risk is, to a great extent, programmed in the womb, and we now see that it

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Preliminary results of two large immune therapy studies show promise in advanced cervical cancer — ScienceDaily

Preliminary results from two independent, phase II clinical trials investigating a new PD-1 (programmed cell death protein 1)-based immune therapy for metastatic cervical cancer suggest potential new treatment options for a disease that currently has limited effective options and disproportionately impacts younger women.

David O’Malley, MD, of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC — James), presented the preliminary study results at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Virtual Congress 2020 on Sept. 18. O’Malley was the lead presenter for both trials, which were sponsored by Agenus Inc.

Each study involved more than 150 patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer from cancer treatment centers across the United States and Europe. All patients were previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy as a first-line therapy. The two independent but consecutive phase II trials tested a new immune-based agent

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Blast Furnaces Market Will Showcase Neutral Impact During 2020-2024 | Large Installed Base of Blast Furnaces to Boost the Market Growth

Technavio has been monitoring the blast furnaces market and it is poised to grow by USD 869.14 mn during 2020-2024, decelerating at a CAGR of almost 3% during the forecast period. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201005005688/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Blast Furnaces Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

Although the COVID-19 pandemic continues to transform the growth of various industries, the immediate impact of the outbreak is varied. While a few industries will register a drop in demand, numerous others will continue to remain unscathed and show promising growth opportunities. Technavio’s in-depth research has all your needs covered as our research reports include all foreseeable market scenarios, including pre- & post-COVID-19 analysis. We offer $1000 worth of FREE customization

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Very Large Telescope finds 6 galaxies trapped in web of supermassive black hole

Oct. 1 (UPI) — Using the Very Large Telescope, a powerful observatory in Chile, astronomers have identified six galaxies trapped in the web of a supermassive black hole when the universe was just 900 million years old.

The discovery, described Thursday in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics, helps explain how supermassive black holes got so big so soon after the Big Bang.

“This research was mainly driven by the desire to understand some of the most challenging astronomical objects — supermassive black holes in the early universe,” lead study author Marco Mignoli said in a news release.

“These are extreme systems and to date we have had no good explanation for their existence,” said Mignoli, an astronomer at the National Institute for Astrophysics in Italy.

The findings lend support to the theory that web-like structures of gas fueled the rapid growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe. When

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Very Large Telescope spots galaxies trapped in the web of a supermassive black hole

ESO telescope spots galaxies trapped in the web of a supermassive black hole
With the help of ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have found six galaxies lying around a supermassive black hole, the first time such a close grouping has been seen within the first billion years of the Universe. This artist’s impression shows the central black hole and the galaxies trapped in its gas web. The black hole, which together with the disc around it is known as quasar SDSS J103027.09+052455.0, shines brightly as it engulfs matter around it. Credit: ESO/L. Calçada

With the help of ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have found six galaxies lying around a supermassive black hole when the Universe was less than a billion years old. This is the first time such a close grouping has been seen so soon after the Big Bang and the finding helps us better understand how supermassive black holes, one of which exists at the centre of our Milky

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Bruker Announces Acquisition of Integrated Proteomics Pipeline (IP2) Software Platform for Large Cohort Translational Studies

IP2 Accelerates CCS-enabled 4D-Proteomics™ with GPU-based Scalable Search Engine

IP2 Adds ‘Run & Done’ Real-Time Capabilities to timsTOF® Proteomics Systems

Bruker Corporation (Nasdaq: BRKR) announces the recent acquisition of the Integrated Proteomics Pipeline (IP2) search engine and proteomics workflow software platform. IP2 was developed by Integrated Proteomics Applications Inc, a company founded by leading proteomics researcher Professor John Yates III, together with Drs. Robin Park and Tao Xu. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200930005135/en/

Prof. John Yates III, The Scripps Research Institute (Photo: Business Wire)

This acquisition further enhances Bruker’s solutions for CCS-enabled 4D-Proteomics™ by adding fast, scalable and GPU-based search engine capabilities for faster data processing and full utilization of molecular collision cross sections (CCS). Benefits include greater data completeness and higher confidence in protein and PTM identification and quantification in unbiased ‘shot-gun’ proteomics. Bruker’s

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18-Foot Python Devours Large Prey Before Villagers, Rescue Caught On Camera

KEY POINTS

  • Villagers spotted the unusual sight and immediately alerted the forest department
  • By the time the officers could arrive at the scene, the reptile had already devoured the animal
  • Python was rescued and released into the wild

A huge python was rescued after it devoured a large prey in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh on Sunday.

Villagers gathered at the scene after they spotted the 18-foot-long python attempting to swallow an animal, which is believed to be a goat. The villagers immediately alerted the forest department, however, by the time the officers could arrive at the scene, the reptile had already devoured the animal.

A video of the rescue showed the bloated python unable to move after swallowing its prey. The officers and the villagers then tied a rope around the reptile and pull it toward a truck. The reptile is then raised from the ground using logs

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New study finds that large, multi-national organizations are not always crucial to local supply chains — ScienceDaily

From toilet paper to industrial chemicals, there’s no doubt the COVID-19 pandemic has been disruptive to global supply chains.

But how important are large, multinational companies in maintaining both local and international logistic networks and should governments be so focused on maintaining larger organisations through subsidies and bail-outs over their smaller counterparts?

A new network analysis by researchers from the University of Sydney’s School of Project Management and the Centre for Complex Systems within the School of Civil Engineering has found that large, multi-national organisations are not always as crucial to local supply chains, and that it’s sometimes the smaller operators that can deliver the hardest logistic shocks to a community when disrupted.

“In the current context where a pandemic is spreading in the world, industry output has already been severely impacted and supply chains have been disrupted. The full effect of this will only become apparent in coming months

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