iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max announced with larger displays, updated design, and 5G

Apple has officially announced its 2020 flagship iPhones: the iPhone 12 Pro and 12 Pro Max, featuring support for 5G and a new squared-off design that’s reminiscent of the iPhone 4. It’s also the first major redesign for Apple’s full-screen smartphones since it introduced the bezel-less design with the iPhone X in 2017.



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Both the 6.1-inch iPhone 12 Pro and 6.7-inch iPhone 12 Pro Max are bigger than last year’s 5.8-inch iPhone 11 Pro and 6.5-inch iPhone 11 Pro Max. The 6.7-inch iPhone 12 Pro Max, in particular, is notable for taking the crown as Apple’s biggest phone to date. The Pro models features a stainless steel design (instead of the aluminum on the iPhone 12), in four colors: gray, stainless steel, gold, and a new blue.

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The new iPhone 12 Pro models will feature Apple’s A14 Bionic chip — first introduced on the refreshed iPad Air last

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First empirical study on how users pay visual attention to mobile app designs shows larger and brighter elements don’t catch our eyes after all — ScienceDaily

As part of an international collaboration, Aalto University researchers have shown that our common understanding of what attracts visual attention to screens, in fact, does not transfer to mobile applications. Despite the widespread use of mobile phones and tablets in our everyday lives, this is the first study to empirically test how users’ eyes follow commonly used mobile app elements.

Previous work on what attracts visual attention, or visual saliency, has centered on desktop and web-interfaces.

‘Apps appear differently on a phone than on a desktop computer or browser: they’re on a smaller screen which simply fits fewer elements and, instead of a horizontal view, mobile devices typically use a vertical layout. Until now it was unclear how these factors would affect how apps actually attract our eyes,’ explains Aalto University Professor Antti Oulasvirta.

In the study, the research team used a large set of representative mobile interfaces and eye

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Larger part of the Amazon at risk of crossing tipping point than previously thought — ScienceDaily

A larger part of the Amazon rainforest is at risk of crossing a tipping point where it could become a savanna-type ecosystem than previously thought, according to new research. The research, based on computer models and data analysis, is published in the journal Nature Communications.

Rainforests are very sensitive to changes that affect rainfall for extended periods. If rainfall drops below a certain threshold, areas may shift into a savanna state.

“In around 40 percent of the Amazon, the rainfall is now at a level where the forest could exist in either state — rainforest or savanna, according to our findings,” says lead author Arie Staal, formerly a postdoctoral researcher at the Stockholm Resilience Centre and the Copernicus Institute of Utrecht University.

The conclusions are concerning because parts of the Amazon region are currently receiving less rain than previously and this trend is expected to worsen as the region

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A Different And Larger Role For The U.S. Government In The Tech Industry

If there ever was an instance of the proverbial handwriting on the wall, this week provided it.  From the TikTok and WeChat affairs to IBM’s filing on facial recognition and the semiconductor industry’s call for government support, the signs are unmistakable: the 40-year old U.S. policy of hands-off tech is coming to an end.  These developments also reveal the rough outlines of the new industrial policy for tech that is beginning to take shape.

The Administration’s approach to TikTok and WeChat is to exclude them from the U.S. market, unless their technology can be separated from the control of Chinese companies.  The concern is not over the companies themselves or their commercial data privacy practices, but the possibility that the data could be obtained by the Chinese government and used in some fashion to harm U.S. national security interests.  In addition, the Administration is concerned that hidden algorithms might allow

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