The Mystery And Science Behind The Law Of Attraction

Transformational coach leveraging science & ancient wisdom to help people manifest their greatness. Blue Dot Transform Consulting

I fondly remember my graduation day, which was on the 25th of April. The master of ceremonies was going to announce the name of the student who bagged the title of best all-rounder for the postgraduate class of 2010. The award also entailed a cash prize worth $1,500.

I was hopeful of winning the title as I had worked tirelessly and visualized the entire scenario several times. “Mental rehearsal,” as scientists call it, is something that performers do quite often before a performance. Here, I was not going to perform something, but I was strongly intending to create an event that my mind had conceived. 

Lo and behold, my crazy thought manifested. As I went up to the stage and received the award, I was reliving each and every moment that I

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ICE responds to reports officer wore NYPD jacket, says the word police is a law enforcement symbol

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is looking into reports that one of its officers wore an NYPD jacket that caused alarm for New York City residents, according to a report.

The agency said “police” is a “universally recognized symbol of law enforcement in most cultures.”

ICE PLANNING IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT OPERATIONS IN SANCTUARY CITIES

“ICE officers are sworn federal law enforcement officers who enforce U.S. immigration laws created by Congress to keep this country safe. The word ‘POLICE’ is a universally recognized symbol of law enforcement in most cultures, an important distinction given that many of the individuals with whom ICE interacts are not native English speakers. Given the inherently dangerous nature of ICE officers’ work, their ability to quickly establish their identity as sworn law enforcement personnel could potentially mean the difference between life and death.”

Brooklyn residents in Fort Greene protested in front of the 88th police precinct Sunday

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‘Universal law of touch’ will enable new advances in virtual reality

touch
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Seismic waves, commonly associated with earthquakes, have been used by scientists to develop a universal scaling law for the sense of touch. A team, led by researchers at the University of Birmingham, used Rayleigh waves to create the first scaling law for touch sensitivity. The results are published in Science Advances.


The researchers are part of a European consortium (H-Reality) that are already using the theory to develop new Virtual Reality technologies that incorporate the sense of touch.

Rayleigh waves are created by impact between objects and are commonly thought to travel only along surfaces. The team discovered that, when it comes to touch, the waves also travel through layers of skin and bone and are picked up by the body’s touch receptor cells.

Using mathematical modelling of these touch receptors the researchers showed how the receptors were located at depths that allowed them to

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Turkey Says Facebook Risks Fines If Flouts New Social Media Law

(Bloomberg) — Turkey will penalize Facebook with escalating fines and could make it excrutiatingly slow to use the platform if the company flouts a new social media law that could be used to stifle dissent.



Buildings on the skyline of the European side sit on the horizon, framed beneath a Turkish flag flying from the Asian side, in Istanbul, Turkey, on Monday, April 27, 2020. Coming off a brief recession just over a year ago, the urgency is mounting for Turkey to loosen the screws on the economy as its currency and reserves come under pressure more than a month after it introduced social-distancing measures.


© Bloomberg
Buildings on the skyline of the European side sit on the horizon, framed beneath a Turkish flag flying from the Asian side, in Istanbul, Turkey, on Monday, April 27, 2020. Coming off a brief recession just over a year ago, the urgency is mounting for Turkey to loosen the screws on the economy as its currency and reserves come under pressure more than a month after it introduced social-distancing measures.

A senior Turkish official said The Menlo Park, California-based company had not formally told the government whether or not it would not be appointing a local representative.

But the social media giant will face an initial 10 million lira ($1.3 million) fine on

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Supreme Court hears Oracle’s claims that Google violated copyright law in using Java to create Android

The case, which has broad ramifications for the software industry, has bounced around various courts over the years. In 2016, jurors ruled Google’s use of the Java code was permitted as “fair use” under federal copyright law. Two years later, a federal appeals court overturned that, ruling that there is “nothing fair about taking a copyrighted work verbatim and using it for the same purpose and function as the original in a competing platform.”

The dispute centers on the technical way software developers use application programming interfaces, or APIs. That’s the computer code that enables websites and applications to work together. APIs also reduce the amount of basic computer coding developers need to write with each program.

Google contends that it only used the pieces of Java code that it could not re-create when developing Android.

“Software programs have always worked with each other, that’s why you can take a

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Athos Group Experiences Dramatic Growth and Expansion in Off-Duty Law Enforcement Market with Simple, Transparent Technology

National off-duty service provider expands footprint with strategic acquisition and best-in-class technology that connects communities with everyday heroes

Athos Group, the nation’s fastest-growing solution and service provider in the off-duty law enforcement security and services industry, experienced continued growth in 2020 with an increase of nearly 22.5 percent of customers from Q1 to Q2 along with a strategic acquisition and technology innovation. In 2006, Athos started with fewer than 100 law enforcement officer associates and two initial clients. Since 2010, Athos has grown more than 11,000% having now worked with over 15,000+ officers across the country, representing more than 1,400 law enforcement agencies (LEAs).

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201006005248/en/

Off-duty or “extra-duty” staffing has existed for decades across law enforcement agencies nationwide. By providing opportunities for law enforcement officers (LEOs) to secure private assignments, businesses can increase security, while helping officers supplement their income.

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The Law Offices of Frank R. Cruz Announces Investigation of Fulton Financial Corporation (FULT) on Behalf of Investors

The Law Offices of Frank R. Cruz announces an investigation of Fulton Financial Corporation (“Fulton” or the “Company”) (NASDAQ: FULT) on behalf of investors concerning the Company’s possible violations of federal securities laws.

If you are a shareholder who suffered a loss, click here to participate.

On September 28, 2020, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) announced that Fulton had been charged with accounting and disclosure violations. Specifically, the SEC stated that, in two quarters in which Fulton was on track to meet or beat analyst consensus EPS estimates, Fulton included a valuation allowance that “was at odds” with its reported methodology. Then, in mid-2017, “Fulton belatedly reversed the valuation allowance, increasing its EPS by a penny in a quarter when it otherwise would have fallen short of consensus estimates.”

On this news, the Company’s share price fell sharply during intraday trading on September 29, 2020.

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Big Tech hearing gives clues on future of antitrust law

In the last of seven hearings to investigate concerns that Google parent Alphabet (GOOG, GOOGL), Facebook (FB), Amazon (AMZN) and Apple (AAPL) are operating as illegal monopolies, witnesses before the House Antitrust Subcommittee Thursday clashed on whether Congress should overhaul U.S. antitrust law.

Proposals from witnesses before the committee, including several antitrust experts, could be a clue to changes forthcoming from the committee. They ranged from introducing legislation that would break up Big Tech companies and overturn judicial precedent to increased funding for antitrust law enforcers to maintaining status quo. 

‘Quintessentially a congressional job’

Zephyr Teachout, associate professor of law at Fordham University School of Law, told the subcommittee on Thursday that Congress, not the Supreme Court, should regulate Big Tech. “It is quintessentially a congressional job to respond to this threat,” Teachout said, calling for “significant” new legislation.

NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES - 2018/09/13: Zephyr Teachout seen speaking on phone during her campaign for Attorney General. (Photo by Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES – 2018/09/13: Zephyr Teachout seen speaking
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Uber, Lyft look to kill California law on app-based drivers

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Californians are being asked to decide if Uber, Lyft and other app-based drivers should remain independent contractors or be eligible for the benefits that come with being company employees.

The battle between the powerhouses of the so-called gig economy and labor unions including the International Brotherhood of Teamsters could become the most expensive ballot measure in state history. Voters are weighing whether to create an exemption to a new state law aimed at providing wage and benefit protections to drivers.

Uber and Lyft have fought a losing battle in the Legislature and courts. So now — with help from app-based food delivery companies DoorDash, Postmates and Instacart — they are spending more than $180 million to take their fight directly to voters in the Nov. 3 election.

Early voting in California starts Monday. Uber and Lyft, both headquartered in San Francisco, have said they may leave

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Leading-Edge Law: Virginia’s new virus-alert app for smartphone passes the privacy test | Business News

After investigating and speaking with Jeff Stover, director of health informatics and integrated surveillance systems at VDH, my privacy concerns are allayed.

Stover said the app was designed to maximize user trust by avoiding use of any information-gathering or technology that could be used for snooping. The app will not identify you.

The app is built upon functionality recently added to operating systems by Google and Apple that allows phones to store and exchange anonymous keys over Bluetooth, he said.

No information regarding app users is kept on a central server. There is no registration process. The app keeps records by anonymous Bluetooth keys stored only on users’ phones. The app collects no GPS or personally identifying information.

The app of those notified will tell the user only that he or she had prolonged, recent exposure to an unnamed person who reported on the app testing positive for COVID-19.

The

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