PwC: Blockchain technologies could boost the global economy US$1.76 trillion by 2030 through raising levels of tracking, tracing and trust

LONDON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — New analysis by PwC shows Blockchain technology has the potential to boost global gross domestic product (GDP) by US$1.76 trillion over the next decade.  

 

 

That is the key finding of a new PwC report Time for trust: The trillion-dollar reason to rethink blockchain,  assessing how the technology is being currently used and exploring the impact blockchain could have on the global economy. Through analysis of the top five uses of blockchain, ranked by their potential to generate economic value, the report gauges the technology’s potential to create value across industry, from healthcare, government and public services, to manufacturing, finance, logistics and retail.

“Blockchain technology has long been associated with cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, but there is so much more that it has to offer, particularly in how public and private organisations secure, share and use data,” comments Steve Davies, Global Leader,

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Cortex-wide variation of neuronal cellular energy levels depending on the sleep-wake states — ScienceDaily

It is assumed that the brain has homeostatic mechanisms to prevent the depletion of cellular energy, required for all cellular activities. For example, the blood flow increases, and oxygen and glucose are actively delivered in the brain region in which neural firing activity occurs. Besides, the cerebral blood flow and glucose uptake into the cells fluctuate accompanying the variations of cellular activities in the brain across the sleep-wake states of animals. Under these brain energy homeostatic mechanisms, it is assumed that the cellular energy status in the brain could be maintained constant in all physiological conditions including across the sleep-wake states of animals. However, this has not been experimentally proven.

To investigate whether the cellular energy status in the brain of living animals is always constant or variated, the researchers measured the neuronal intracellular concentration of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP), the major cellular energy metabolite, using a fluorescent sensor in the

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Wealth Management M&A Activity Surges To Record Levels

The third quarter of 2020 will be remembered as one of the most unique periods of merger and acquisition activity in the history of the wealth management industry.

There were a record number of deals in Q3 – 55 transactions in total, according to the latest ECHELON Partners RIA M&A Deal Report – which surpasses the previous high of 53 deals that our research tracked in Q4 2019.

This record period comes directly after just 35 deals took place in Q2. This 57% increase in quarter-over-quarter M&A activity also registers as one of the sharpest increases in the industry’s history, marking a major rebound after the COVID-19-related market declines delayed and prolonged normal deal-making activity, as the figure below illustrates:

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Tech investment surges to unprecedented levels due to COVID-19

Global companies spent around $15 billion extra a week on technology during the pandemic’s first wave, Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO survey finds.

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Image: Harvey Mudd/KPMG

Global IT leaders spent around $15 billion extra a week on technology to enable safe and secure home working during COVID-19, according to the 2020 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey. This was one of the biggest surges in technology investment in history— with the world’s IT leaders spending an additional 5% more of their IT budget to deal with the COVID-19 crisis, the survey said.

The technology leadership survey of over 4,200 IT leaders analyzed responses from organizations with a combined technology spend of over $250 billion. It also found that despite this huge surge of spending and security and privacy being the top investment during COVID-19, four in 10 IT leaders report that their company has experienced more cyberattacks.

Over three-quarters of these attacks were from

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Climate change responsible for record sea temperature levels — ScienceDaily

Global warming is driving an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures including in the Mediterranean, according to a major new report published by the peer-reviewed Journal of Operational Oceanography.

Data from the European Union’s (EU) Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) will increase concerns about the threat to the world’s seas and oceans from climate change.

The Ocean State Report reveals an overall trend globally of surface warming based on evidence from 1993 to 2018, with the largest rise in the Arctic Ocean.

European seas experienced record high temperatures in 2018, a phenomenon which the researchers attribute to extreme weather conditions — a marine heat wave lasting several months.

In the same year, a large mass of warm water occurred in the northeast Pacific Ocean, according to the report. This was similar to a marine heatwave — dubbed ‘the Blob’ — which was first detected in 2013 and had devastating

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Participants in an eight-week mindfulness-based stress reduction course reported significant improvement in levels of pain, depression and disability — ScienceDaily

A mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course was found to benefit patients with chronic pain and depression, leading to significant improvement in participant perceptions of pain, mood and functional capacity, according to a study in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Most of the study respondents (89%) reported the program helped them find ways to better cope with their pain while 11% remained neutral.

Chronic pain is a common and serious medical condition affecting an estimated 100 million people in the United States, which correlates with annual costs of approximately $635 billion. The small-scale study was conducted in a semi-rural population in Oregon where issues of affordability, addiction and access to care are common. Participants received intensive instruction in mindfulness meditation and mindful hatha yoga during an eight-week period.

“Many people have lost hope because, in most cases, chronic pain will never fully resolve,” says Cynthia Marske, DO, an

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HyperX Announces New Impact DDR4 SODIMM Memory Amid Record Levels of Notebook and PC Sales

Powerful SODIMM Performance Memory Enhances PCs for Working, Schooling or Gaming From Home

As households across the nation continue to work from home and school from home, HyperX, the gaming division of Kingston Technology, Inc., today announced the release of new HyperX Impact DDR4 SODIMM memory for enhanced performance in notebooks and small form factor PCs. The new single rank 16GB Impact DDR4 SODIMM memory is available as single modules and in various kit configurations from 8GB to 64GB to help boost PC performance for a range of working, gaming, and schooling needs.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200929005125/en/

HyperX Impact DDR4 SODIMM (Photo: Business Wire)

“The new Impact DDR4 SODIMM utilizes the latest technology to offer high performance coupled with maximum reliability,” said Kristy Ernt, DRAM business manager, HyperX. “The Plug N Play functionality of HyperX Impact DDR4 SODIMM memory increases overall performance in

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First measurements of radiation levels on the moon — ScienceDaily

In the coming years and decades, various nations want to explore the moon, and plan to send astronauts there again for this purpose. But on our inhospitable satellite, space radiation poses a significant risk. The Apollo astronauts carried so-called dosimeters with them, which performed rudimentary measurements of the total radiation exposure during their entire expedition to the moon and back again. In the current issue (25 September) of the journal Science Advances, Chinese and German scientists report for the first time on time-resolved measurements of the radiation on the moon.

The “Lunar Lander Neutron and Dosimetry” (LND) was developed and built at Kiel University, on behalf of the Space Administration at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), with funding from the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The measurements taken by the LND allow the calculation of the so-called equivalent dose. This is important to estimate the biological

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If Arctic ice melt doesn’t boost sea levels, do we care?

US government scientists reported Monday that the Arctic Ocean’s floating ice cover has shrivelled to its second lowest extent since satellite records began in 1979.

Until this month, only once in the last 42 years has Earth’s frozen skull cap covered less than four million square kilometres (1.5 million square miles).

The trend line is clear: sea ice extent has diminished 14 percent per decade over that period. The Arctic could see it’s first ice-free summer as early as 2035, researchers reported in Nature Climate Change last month.

But all that melting ice and snow does not directly boost sea levels any more than melted ice cubes make a glass of water overflow, which gives rise to an awkward question: who cares?

Granted, it’s a red flag. 

“The decline in Arctic sea ice in summer is one of the clearest, most unequivocal signs of climate change,” said Julien Nicolas, an

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Radiation levels on moon more than double those on space station

Sept. 25 (UPI) — Radiation levels on the surface of the moon are 2.6 times greater than those measured on the International Space Station, according to a new study.

NASA intends to put the first woman on the moon by 2024 — and the first man since 1972. Earlier this week, the space agency released new details about its Artemis program, including its decision to target a landing spot on the lunar South Pole near Shackleton Crater.

Regardless of where NASA’s lunar landers touch down, Artemis astronauts will need to protect themselves from increased radiation levels.

Using the Lunar Lander Neutron and Dosimetry, or LND, scientists were able to, for the first time, measure radiation levels on the lunar surface.

Scientists shared the first-of-their-kind measurements in a new paper, published Friday in the journal Science Advances.

“The radiation exposure we have measured is a good benchmark for the radiation within

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