Neuromorphic computing could solve the tech industry’s looming crisis

What’s the best computer in the world? The most souped-up, high-end gaming rig? Whatever supercomputer took the number one spot in the TOP500 this year? The kit inside the datacentres that Apple or Microsoft rely on? Nope: it’s the one inside your skull. 

As computers go, brains are way ahead of the competition. They’re small, lightweight, have low energy consumption, and are amazingly adaptable. And they’re also set to be the model for the next wave of advanced computing.

These brain-inspired designs are known collectively as ‘neuromorphic computing’. Even the most advanced computers don’t come close to the human brain — or even most mammal brains — but our grey matter can give engineers and developers a few pointers on how to make computing infrastrastructure more efficient, by mimicking the brain’s own synapses and neurones.

SEE: Building the bionic brain (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

First, the biology. Neurones are nerve cells,

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Judge sets TikTok hearing for Sunday amid looming ban

Sept. 26 (UPI) — A federal judge has set a hearing for Sunday morning to decide on the fate of the video-sharing app TikTok ahead of Trump’s ban slated to take effect by midnight of the same day.

U.S. District Judge Carl Nichols scheduled the hearing to decide whether or not the United States has the authority to ban the app after the video-sharing app’s owner ByteDance asked the court to block the ban, arguing in court filings that the ban would impede constitutional free-speech protections.

President Donald Trump’s administration initially scheduled the ban against TikTok to take effect last Sunday, but it was delayed to this upcoming Sunday.

The ban slated to take effect by midnight Sunday would remove TikTok from app stores Apple, Google, and Android run and remove access to updates to help make the app move smoothly for millions of Americans who already have the app.

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Trump’s looming ban prompts some to download the app

Luna Flesher had considered downloading TikTok but worried about the security of the short-form video app. Plus, the 46-year-old thought the app, famous for dance-offs and lip-syncing, was for teens.



a close up of a logo: TikTok has more than 100 million users in the US. Angela Lang/CNET


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TikTok has more than 100 million users in the US. Angela Lang/CNET

On Friday, Flesher pushed those concerns aside and started using TikTok for the first time after news broke that the Trump administration planned to bar new downloads of the app on midnight Sunday. 

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“If someone threatens to take away something from us that we feel we have a freedom to do, we do have a tendency to latch onto it and be motivated to protect that freedom,” said Flesher, a freelance writer in Washington state. “I am recognizing that in my own behavior.” 

As the Trump administration moves forward with plans to restrict TikTok, people like Flesher are downloading the short-form video

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